Harvest wrapping up; winter wheat lags

News
Nov 2, 2012
by DTN

The nation’s row-crop harvest continued to run well ahead of normal this past week while emergence of the winter wheat crop was slightly behind normal, according to USDA’s weekly Crop Progress report. Release of the report was delayed until Wednesday due to Hurricane Sandy.

As of Sunday, Oct. 28, both the corn and soybean harvests were entering the homestretch, with 91 percent of the corn crop and 87 percent of soybeans harvested. That compares to the five-year averages of 60 percent for corn and 78 percent for soybeans.

Sorghum harvest had reached 64 percent by the end of the week, slightly ahead of the average of 60 percent.

Meanwhile, winter wheat planting, at 88 percent complete, was running slightly ahead of the average of 85 percent. However, emergence of the crop was slightly behind normal at 63 percent compared to the average of 67 percent. Winter wheat condition was rated 40 percent good to excellent, which was below last year’s 46 percent good-to-excellent rating.

National Ag Statistics Service highlights:

Colorado: The state saw only limited precipitation this past week, and temperatures fell below normal.

Farmers had 5.8 days suitable for field work, on average. Topsoil moisture levels improved to 31 percent very short, 41 percent short, 28 percent adequate, with no surplus. Subsoil moisture levels also improved to 53 percent very short, 39 percent short, 8 percent adequate, with no surplus. Corn harvest progressed to 80 percent complete, 19 points ahead of the five-year average. Winter wheat planting is over and emergence reached 77 percent, down from a five-year average of 91 percent.

Iowa: Warmer weather with scattered storms at the beginning of the past week gave way to lower temperatures and drier weather towards the weekend. Statewide, the average precipitation total was 0.93 inches, up from the average of 0.56 inches. As a result, farmers saw only 3.9 days suitable for field work. Topsoil moisture levels were rated 26 percent very short, 38 percent short, 35 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 58 percent very short, 34 percent short, 8 percent adequate, and no surplus. Corn harvest has reached 95 percent complete, one month ahead of normal. The soybean harvest has reached 97 percent complete, two weeks ahead of normal.

Kansas: Windy weather and dry conditions gave farmers 6 days suitable for fieldwork, on average. Topsoil moisture levels were rated 34 percent very short, 32 percent short, 34 percent adequate, and no surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 49 percent very short, 35 percent short, 16 percent adequate, and no surplus. Ninety-seven percent of the corn crop has been harvested, up from a five-year average of 78 percent. Soybean harvest reached 74 percent complete, just above the five year average of 70 percent.

Winter wheat was 96 percent planted and 76 percent emerged, just above the averages of 89 percent planted and 73 percent emerged.

Minnesota: All reporting stations recorded precipitation, although amounts were lighter in western areas. More than an inch was recorded at most reporting stations in southeastern areas. Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 27 percent very short, 42 percent short, 29 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 47 percent very short, 41 percent short and 12 percent adequate. As of Oct. 28, corn was 98 percent harvested, compared to 89 percent last year and 58 percent for the five-year average.

Missouri: Temperatures were 1 to 3 degrees above average. Precipitation averaged 0.64 inch statewide.

The central and north-central districts averaged 0.83 and 0.80 inch. Topsoil moisture supply was 18 percent very short, 28 percent short, 52 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was 42 percent very short, 37 percent short and 21 percent adequate. Fall tillage was at 61 percent, four days ahead of last year and 15 days ahead of the five-year average of 39 percent. Soybeans harvested were 62 percent, eight days behind last year, but the same as normal. Winter wheat planted was 67 percent, two days behind last year but five days ahead of normal. Winter wheat emergence was 45 percent, two days ahead of last year and six days ahead of normal. Wheat condition was 54 percent good to excellent.

Nebraska: Below-normal temperatures, windy conditions, and some much-needed precipitation slowed harvest as farmers had only 5.4 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture levels were rated 67 percent very short, 24 percent short, 9 percent adequate, and no surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 79 percent very short, 18 percent short, 3 percent adequate, and no surplus. Corn harvest reached 94 percent complete, well above the five-year average of 50 percent. Soybean harvest reached 98 percent, ahead of the five-year average of 85 percent. Winter wheat emergence was at 74 percent, well below the five-year average of 93 percent, due to dry soil conditions.

North Dakota: Statewide, temperatures averaged below normal, and precipitation averaged above normal in the western and northern regions and below normal everywhere else. On average, farmers had 4.2 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture levels were rated 22 percent very short, 34 percent short, 42 percent adequate, and 2 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 30 percent very short, 40 percent short, 29 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. The corn harvest reached 94 percent complete, well beyond the five-year average of 42 percent.

Ohio: The average temperature for the state was 58.6 degrees, 8 degrees above normal for the week. Precipitation averaged 0.78 inch, 0.3 inch above normal. Topsoil moisture was rated 7 percent very short, 24 percent short, 62 percent adequate and 7 percent surplus.

As of Sunday, 64 percent of the corn was harvested for grain, ahead of the five-year average by 16 percentage points. Soybeans harvested were rated at 79 percent, compared to 80 percent for the five-year average. Winter wheat planted was rated at 82 percent, compared to 88 percent for the five-year average. Winter wheat emerged was rated at 41 percent, 19 percentage points behind the five-year average. Winter wheat was rated 82 percent in fair-to-good condition.

Oklahoma: The past week began with unusually warm temperatures, but cooler weather moved in by Thursday. All but northwestern regions of the state saw some light rainfall. On average, farmers had 6.7 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture levels dropped to 39 percent very short, 38 percent short, 23 percent adequate, and no surplus. Subsoil moisture levels also fell slightly to 57 percent very short, 32 percent short, 11 percent adequate, and no surplus. Soybean harvest reached 46 percent complete, up from 38 percent on average. Wheat was 92 percent planted and 71 percent emerged, just slightly above the five-year averages of 86 percent planted and 69 percent emerged.

South Dakota: Cooler temperatures and light precipitation visited much of the state this past week. Topsoil moisture levels were rated 60 percent very short, 24 percent short, 16 percent adequate, and no surplus. Subsoil moisture levels were rated 72 percent very short, 20 percent short, 9 percent adequate, and no surplus. Winter wheat seeding reached 95 percent complete and 23 percent has emerged, down slightly from the five-year average of 98 percent planted and 88 percent emerged.

Texas: Eastern regions of the state saw some precipitation while most of the western regions and Panhandle remained dry. Topsoil moisture was rated 19 percent very short, 40 percent short, 40 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Corn harvest neared completion with 96 percent harvested, up from 91 percent on average. Cotton harvest reached 42 percent complete, up from 32 percent on average. Ninety percent of soybeans were harvested, right on par with the average. Winter wheat planting reached 82 percent complete, with 62 percent emerged, up from the average of 78 percent planted and 54 percent emerged.

Wisconsin: Across the reporting stations, average temperatures this past week were 2 to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation totals ranged from 0.52 inch in Green Bay to 1.74 inches La Crosse. Statewide, topsoil moisture was rated 9 percent very short, 36 percent short, 50 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus. Corn was 77 percent harvested for grain statewide. Reporters statewide noted that storage facilities and silos were starting to fill up. Yield reports continued to be highly variable. Fall tillage was 47 percent complete. — DTN

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