New trichomoniasis rules in effect for cattle importation

News
Sep 21, 2012
by WLJ

The ongoing threat of trichomoniasis has led to tighter restrictions on the importation of cattle into North Dakota.

“The North Dakota State Board of Animal Health recently clarified the trichomoniasis requirements for cattle entering North Dakota,” Dr. Susan Keller, the state veterinarian, said. “North Dakota producers should consult their veterinarian before bringing in animals from out of state.”

Keller said the board voted unanimously to allow female cattle, including cow/ calf pairs, to enter the state unrestricted only if the cows are confirmed pregnant or accompanied by their own calf prior to rebreeding. Nonpregnant females may only be imported if they are virgin heifers or if they are restricted to dry lot premises for feeding and slaughter only.

A venereal disease of cattle caused by the protozoan Trichomonas foetus, trichomoniasis can result in widespread infertility and abortion. It can be economically devastating. It is not transmissible to humans.

Keller said producers should also ensure other health requirements are met before importing cattle.

“Due to severe drought conditions across the U.S., we expect more cattle will be moving into North Dakota this fall,” she said. “North Dakota producers receiving these cattle can be held responsible if requirements are not met.”

Keller said veterinarians who sign certificates of veterinary inspection should call the state veterinarian’s office at 701/328-2655 for requirements before importation of the animals. — WLJ

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