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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by DTN
Jun 27, 2008
Farmers prepare for higher fuel costs Central Iowa corn and soybean farmer Charles Helland usually waits until closer to fall before securing his fuel needs for the season, but this year he’s planning to firm up fuel needs in the next week or so. "In the past, fuel costs haven’t varied that much from the beginning of summer to the end, so it wasn’t much of an issue,"" said Helland, who farms with his brother Mike near Huxley, IA. "But in these markets, who knows how high the price of diesel will be come fall?" Early-bird buying isn’t the only new habit for
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by DTN
Dec 20, 2007
Chicago Mercantile Exchange Holdings Inc. (CME) said it would increase the value of its $10 billion bid for the Chicago Board of Trade by adding a special dividend for owners of CBOT Holdings Inc. (BOT). The move, announced last Thursday, is designed to respond to a similar proposal from IntercontinentalExchange Inc. (ICE), which is pursuing a hostile bid for CBOT, the owner of the country’s oldest futures exchange. Shortly afterward, CBOT said it had rejected ICE’s latest offer. In its announcement, which followed a meeting of CBOT’s board, CBOT said the revised bid isn’t superior to its revised agreement with
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by DTN
Dec 20, 2007
That’s 15 percent of the federally controlled water in California, which would make it the largest grant to irrigators since the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation was created in 1903, agency officials said. The Westlands Water District, a coalition of giant agribusinesses in the fertile San Joaquin Valley, draws its water from the Central Valley Project, a vast irrigation system that also supplies drinking water to about 1 million households. If drought-like conditions persist in the West, a deal would guarantee the farmers’ irrigation pumps will flow, even if that means some cities in the San Francisco Bay area will get
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by DTN
Dec 20, 2007
Working to heighten public awareness on the Bush administration’s efforts to improve the safety of imports, two cabinet secretaries toured a small meat plant on Sept. 12 to talk about the importance of high business standards. Cracks in import safety have become a national focus this year with recalls ranging from pet foods to children’s toys. It has led to a political and consumer backlash that will place more demands on businesses and government officials to ensure foreign products are safe. The demands, however, are stressing the inspection system as the global economy and more trade deals open up U.S. ports


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