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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
New West Nile virus treatment Colorado Serum Company recently introduced its West Nile Virus Antibody, Equine Origin, for use in controlling West Nile Virus (WNV) in horses. It is recommended that veterinarians use the West Nile Virus Antibody when the disease is detected in an unvaccinated horse or a vaccinated horse that has contracted the disease. Administered intravenously, West Nile Virus Antibody will enhance an animal’s ability to fight the virus by neutralizing it, and aid in the overall treatment. Unlike other WNV antibody treatments, this product is concentrated, purified and ready to use straight from the bottle—offering veterinarians an easy
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
— Online purchases to remain slow. Ranch real estate brokers and estate auction companies are indicating that online bidding for extensive ranch and recreational properties has grown by leaps and bounds. In fact, several sources said they wouldn’t be surprised if 50 percent of interested investors would choose to bid via the Internet or other electronic avenues by the end of 2005. “That doesn’t mean that half of all ranch auction acquisitions would be made through online bidding, but it does mean a lot more bidding competition would come from prospective buyers unable to attend a one-day auction or if an auction
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Fed beef trade was slow and cautious last week. Cattle feeders appeared to think they were in the driver’s seat and were wanting to make packers pay more for their slaughter needs than the week previous. However, as of Thursday at noon, packers were not coming to the table with more than $90 per cwt. In fact, most bids were $88-89 across the country. For the week, as of press time Thursday, 10-12,000 head of cattle traded in northern feeding areas at mostly $139 dressed, while Texas sellers had moved only 2-3,000 head at $88 live. Most trade during the week leading
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
U.S. retail grocers appear to be planning for a return to beef featuring in early January, said market analysts and meat buyers who based their opinions on wholesale buying patterns and live cattle and hog markets. After pushing pork and turkey hard for two months, many retailers typically like to go back with a beef ad in January, analysts and buyers said. Specific products tend to be different than they would be in the spring or summer, but it's still beef. Retail grocery advertising circulars in the coming weeks are likely to focus on a mix of products with no real feature
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
The state is proposing to vaccinate bison that stray from Yellowstone National Park, a move intended to help prevent the spread of disease to Montana cattle. But some activists oppose the Livestock Department’s plan, questioning the vaccine’s efficacy. The debate heats up each winter, when some Yellowstone bison wander off in search of food. Ranchers in Montana worry the animals will transmit brucellosis, a disease that can cause cattle to abort their pregnancies. Activists contend the fear is unjustified. “Why throw taxpayer money down the drain to keep a handful of ranchers happy?” said Mike Mease of the Buffalo Field Campaign. Steve Pilcher, executive
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Real estate specialists are predicting that 2005 will continue to be strong and steady for farm and ranch land sales in the southern parts of the U.S. They attribute this continuance to the scarcity of land in these states. Richard Johnson, an associate broker with Arizona-based Tucson Realty & Trust Co., said that agriculture lands are still escalating for two reasons. One is because cattle prices are remaining high and the second is because developers are actively pursuing land for open space and home building. Johnson cited a run on property along interstate 10 between Tucson and Pheonix and said that
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Ewe lamb applications due USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) posted the Final Rule for the 2004 Ewe Lamb Replacement and Retention Payment Program (ELRRPP) in the Dec. 23 Federal Register. The rule announced that the application period for the program will end January 13, 2005. The program was designed to encourage the replacement and retention of the ewe-lamb breeding stock in the U.S. ELRRPP provides direct payments to producers at a rate of $18 per ewe retained in the base period from Aug. 1, 2003, through July 31, 2004. Total payments to this program cannot exceed $18 million. In the event
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Banned materials from cattle are infiltrating the human food chain despite rules meant to prohibit the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and associated health risks to human beings, according to an official with the federal meat inspectors’ union. USDA’s Food Safety Inspection Service (SIS) denied the allegations in published reports. An agency spokesman said FSIS had full confidence that the inspections were being carried out properly. No one returned a call to the agency by WLJ’s deadline, and the FSIS spokesman was not available during the holiday week. Charles S. “Stan” Painter, chairman of the federal meat inspectors’ union, National Joint
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
The way animals are raised for food needs to be urgently changed in an attempt to prevent a possible global flu pandemic that could kill millions of people, a senior World Health Organization official said Friday, Nov. 26. Shigeru Omi, Western Pacific regional director of WHO, said bird flu could cause the next global pandemic, and efforts to control it must begin with farming methods. “I believe we are closer now to a pandemic than at any time recent years," Omi said. He said the current outbreak of bird flu in poultry is "historically unprecedented in terms of geographical spread and impact," the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
The feast or famine scenario is never far away for those in the beef business. Ironically, the same scenario is evident in the crop business. Generally, crop producers are very market focused, entwining farm program concerns, management options, and individual will to come up with an annual approach to production. The triad of producer inputs generally produces a crop output that has a home,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
The United States Mint recently announced it was releasing a new limited-edition nickel in 2005 featuring an American bison and a newly-designed image of Thomas Jefferson. The National Bison Association (NBA) called the announcement "a dynamic tribute to the heritage and the future of this great American symbol." "We are excited, not only by the announcement, but also by the beautiful
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
A Brazilian government delegation came away emptied handed from meetings with Russian authorities to convince them to lift a ban on Brazilian meat imports following an outbreak of hoof-and-mouth disease (HMD) in the Amazon region, Brazil's agriculture ministry said last Thursday. "They were very firm and gave no indication of when the embargo may end," said Agriculture Minister Roberto Rodrigues.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
With winter fast approaching, the National Park Service (NPS) and Wyoming Fish and Game Department (WFGD) are putting some serious thought into a brucellosis vaccination program for free-roaming elk and bison herds. Topping the list of available technology are "biobullets," a vaccine delivered from a pneumatic rifle. If this plan is approved, it will be the first vaccination of free-roaming bison in the Yellowstone National
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
After a successful trial run in five colleges and universities, cattle marketing specialists with Denver-based Cattle-Fax recently announced broad-scale availability of its Beef Executive Seminar Training (BEST) program to universities and colleges nationwide. The course is designed to increase students' knowledge of marketing and risk-management concepts and principles, while using course information and applications to replicate business decisions in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
— Marketings could mean $86-plus feds. — Placements down third straight month. Market analysts were quick to call USDA's September 1 Cattle-on-Feed (CoF) Report, released September 17, supportive to both the cattle futures complex and the cash fed cattle market. Leading the optimism was last month's double-digit-percentage drop in August feedlot placements, compared to 2003, and an August marketing figure
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold, D-WI, last week urged USDA to offer more technical assistance for producers willing to use their land for conservation practices. In a letter to USDA Secretary Ann Veneman, Feingold wrote that because of the administration's decision to not reimburse Natural Resource Conservation Service staff, who assist producers in making decisions when signing up for the Conservation Reserve Program, some Wisconsinites
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
— Next labeling effort not expected until ‘05. A last minute amendment to the Senate's proposed $84 billion agriculture appropriations bill to move up the implementation date of mandatory country-of-origin-labeling (COOL) from September 30, 2006, to January 1, 2005, died last week when a Senate Appropriation Committee vote tied 14-14. Congressional aides and Washington, DC, lobbyists doubted that any further
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
"When you can't work harder, you have to work smarter." That age-old advice has never been more appropriate than today's busy life on the ranch, with time, money, and man-power getting harder to come by. Many ranchers are turning to well-trained cowdogs to fill the gap, with growing interest in a composite breed known as Hangin' Tree Cowdogs. These dogs and their ability to perform
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
— Washington, Oregon, Idaho affected. — Announcement less than expected. For the second time this month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced critical habitat designation for a federally protected species in an effort to comply with a court order. Like the last time, environmentalists have stated displeasure with the announcement while ranching interests are taking a wait-and-see approach
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
Europeans eat less of the most dangerous, cholesterol-raising fats than Americans do and the amount is decreasing, according to a report released September 2 by the European Food Safety Authority, reports the Associated Press. Scientists at the European Food Safety Authority declined to say whether the EU should follow the U.S.' lead and require special labels on margarine, chips,


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