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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) recently published a formal notice urging livestock processors to use a more systematic approach to ensure they are meeting the requirements of the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act (HMSA). In addition, the agency said it will be quicker to levy penalties against processors that violate HMSA rules and that don't actively work to remedy "inhumane" procedures.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
Nebraska, Minnesota and Texas schools have all pulled their standing orders for irradiated beef this school year as USDA contends suppliers continue to charge too much for the product. According to USDA, suppliers were still asking approximately $2.50 per pound for irradiated hamburger and ground beef, as early as the first week of September. That price is almost 75 cents more than the cost for
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
— Cost, time, labor remain primary deterrents. Japan's announcement that they will open the borders to beef from animals proven to be under 20 months of age could certainly push along efforts to implement a mandatory national animal identification program (NAIP). But, is every segment of the beef industry ready for a mandatory ID program? One thing is for certain, auction markets are stuck in the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
USDA's Agriculture Research Service (ARS) is in the process of developing a gene bank of at least 50 unrelated sires from every recognized breed of cattle. These embryos and semen are being kept in case of a disease outbreak and also as a means for genetic research. Harvey Blackburn, geneticist and coordinator of the Fort Collins, CO, based National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation said
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
U.S. beef imports from Canada are not making up for the fed cattle that were being brought across the border for slaughter before they were blocked in May 2003 when bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was discovered north of the border. Currently, only boneless beef from young cattle is allowed to cross the border. No live cattle may enter the U.S. from Canada, and even certain
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Calgary's City Council, on the night of Monday, September 13, deferred consideration until January 2005 of a meat-packing plant, which had already received technical approval from Calgary's planning commission. The decision came just days after the Canadian government pledged millions in aid for more slaughterhouses to deal with the glut of cattle from the BSE crisis. Few of the slaughterhouse
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
What does a state's beef industry do when its promotion dollars limit it to approximately four cents a consumer, not enough to even cover the cost of a postage stamp? That was the question that came up during an interview with Bruce Berven, outgoing executive director of the California Beef Council (CBC), and Virginia Coelho, CBC board member, during the Hagata Ranch Centennial Celebration,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Canadian Agriculture Minister Andy Mitchell announced an aid package of almost a half a billion dollars September 10 for Canadian cattle producers devastated by the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad-cow disease, crisis. Once consultations have been completed, Mitchell said, the federal investment will total C$488 million dollars. Analysts ahead of the announcement had been expecting new money in the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Last month's announcement that a moderately-large-scale Tama, IA, cattle and beef processing facility was being shuttered, at least temporarily, brought back a lot of not-so-fond memories concerning independent cattle producers and the hard time they seem to have getting started in the packing business. The most alarming thing to me about the 1,200-head-per-day-capacity Iowa Quality Beef cooperative's situation is
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
A large crowd of nearly 400 cattle people attended the Hagata Ranch Centennial Celebration, September 4, Susanville, CA. Located some 100 miles north of Reno, NV, off Highway 395, Frank Hagata's father, John, founded the ranch in 1904 in Lassen County, one of the premier ranching counties in the state. In attendance was a big crowd of mostly ranch people. Everything for the day was
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Producer organizations and industry officials agree, implementing a National Animal Identification Program (NAIP) is not going to be an easy task. For producers to start tagging every animal, and for data to be collected and kept for those animals in every segment of the production chain, there's going to be challenges to face. In particular, auction markets may be given the largest share of the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
— U.S. beef acceptance still down the road. — Japan's 12th case no factor. Japanese government officials last Wednesday formally announced that they would exempt cattle under 20 months of age from being tested for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). However, the entry of U.S. beef into Japan will be delayed until the two countries can agree on the science, or verification
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Japan and Mexico are signing a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) this week, which will mark the first time Tokyo has made a comprehensive pact involving agriculture products. This landmark treaty is beneficial to both sides, giving Mexican farmers more export opportunities, and Japanese auto and steelmakers more access to the Mexican market with a reduction in tariffs. Over 300 agriculture products in total are covered
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
— RFID program adds value to calves. While a large portion of cattle industry participants have been waiting on a nationwide program before starting to implement an individual animal identification system, one central Plains livestock auction took a more proactive approach and is ahead of the livestock ID curve. This past June, Joplin Regional Stockyards, Joplin, MO, held a special late
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski would like to see wolves back in Oregon although the species has been extirpated from the state for more than 50 years. Last year, Kulongoski commissioned the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to draft a plan for wolf reintroduction. The 14-member committee appointed to advise and develop a draft a Wolf Management Plan concluded their scheduled meetings last week,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Beginning October 1, a second dairy cow retirement will be put into implementation in order to reduce national milk supplies and spike sputtering milk prices. Several beef market analysts said that while the program will ruffle some cow/calf producers' feathers, that the program will probably not hurt the beef market that much, if any. According to officials in charge of Cooperatives Working Together (CWT),
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
— Frosts ignored by agency; analysts still uncertain. — Grain price down early, but recovering last week. In its most recent crop production forecast, released Friday, September 10, USDA's National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS) dismissed most fears about early frosts in several northern-tier corn states and projected an 11 billion bushel corn crop, a record by over 800 million bushels. The
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Looking into the future is tricky business. As renowned economist Peter Drucker once said, "Forecasting future trends is a somewhat futile exercise. The best we can do is to take trends that are already occurring and extrapolate them into the future." The following trends and projections represent a consensus of numerous analysts in every beef industry sector, from seedstock to consumer. These trends,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
Researchers have isolated a strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with the potential to not only reduce meat spoilage, but also reduce contamination by food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7 and listeria monocytogenes. "Meat processors tell us that one of their biggest concerns is LAB," said Dr. Frances Nattress, an Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researcher based in Lacombe. "Processors say that LAB are a frequent


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