Home / Articles / by WLJ
Search: in Authors List
 

WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
Approximately one month after USDA experts returned from their investigative mission to Canada in which they sought to determine the effectiveness of that country’s ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban, the agency released an official report of the findings. Overall, USDA found Canada to be in compliance and just as proficient as the U.S. with a similar feed ban. The results answered many of the industry’s questions that arose after two cows from separate herds were discovered to be infected with BSE within the first few weeks of January. “After the two recent BSE finds in Canada, it was important to get a team
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
— Trade minister says delay unsatisfactory. Canadian government and cattle industry officials were openly indicating last week that trade lawsuits may be filed against the U.S. under the auspices of the World Trade Organization (WTO) or North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The possibility of trade litigation between the two countries was brought up after U.S. District Judge Richard Cebull, Billings, MT, granted a temporary injunction against USDA’s March 7 date for allowing Canadian live cattle to reenter the U.S. According to Canada’s International Trade Minister Jim Peterson, the agreement to reopen the border to Canadian cattle and expanded category of beef was
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
— Futures gains cited. — Calves, feeders steady to firmer. A strong rally in live-cattle futures last Thursday prompted packers to come to the trading table with significantly more money than they used the previous week. That resulted in cash cattle trade being $4-5 stronger. As of press time last Thursday, Kansas and Texas cattle feeders had sold 40-45,000 head each within a range of $90-91.50, with the majority bringing $90.50. Northern trade tallied 50-55,000 head at mostly $90 live, $142-144 dressed. Early week packer bids were mostly $85 live, $140 dressed and prospective sellers were asking at least $90 live, $143 dressed. A
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
I suppose that the Montana federal judge made the expected decision. After all, he appears to have been handpicked by the folks at R-CALF. If you support keeping the Canadian border closed, you had a really good week last week. If you don’t, be patient; logic will, hopefully, prevail—eventually. R-CALF had their request for a temporary injunction handed to them by U.S. District Judge Richard Cebull last Wednesday. I’m not certain that his decision came as any big surprise, but, it was the only wild card playable in this border game. Otherwise the border would be ready to open today, March
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
Concentration in agricultural markets continues to rise according to statistics released Feb. 25 by National Farmers Union during its 103rd anniversary convention in Lexington, KY. An NFU-commissioned study conducted by Mary Hendrickson and William Heffernan from the University of Missouri Department of Rural Sociology revealed that the top four firms in most agricultural sectors have increased their stronghold since the last study, released in 2002. The study showed the top four beef packers now dominate 83.5 percent of the market. Four pork packers control 64 percent of that market, and the top four poultry companies process 56 percent of the broilers in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
A federal appeals court has ruled that new federal clean-water regulations aren’t protecting the nation’s waters from the manure pollution of large farms. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan said Monday it agreed with environmentalists who claimed in lawsuits that the rules failed to provide meaningful review of plans developed by the farms to limit the pollution. The court said the rules imposed in February 2003 by the Environmental Protection Agency were arbitrary and capricious and did “nothing to ensure that each large farm was complying with requirements to control the pollution. Its ruling requires the EPA to make changes
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
One Alberta automobile dealership is allowing Canadian ranchers to trade in a portion of their stockpiled cattle as trade-ins towards the purchase of new trucks or cars. Cochrane Dodge Chrysler in Cochrane, Alberta, is allowing Canadian producers to trade 10 head of cattle toward the purchase of a diesel truck, five head of cattle toward the purchase of a gasoline-powered truck and one or two head toward the purchase of a car. An appraiser will be on-premises to determine the fair market value of the cattle. The program started last week and is slated to last about two weeks total.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) last Monday released data showing a 43.3 percent drop in the percentage of E. coli O157:H7 positive ground beef regulatory samples collected in 2004 compared with the previous year. Of the 8,010 samples collected and analyzed in 2004, 0.17 percent tested positive for E. coli O157:H7, down from 0.30 in 2003, 0.78 in 2002, 0.84 in 2001 and 0.86 in 2000. Between 2000 and 2004, the percentage of positive samples in FSIS regulatory sampling has declined by more than 80 percent. In April 2004, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in its annual
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
The U.S. Meat Export Federation (MEF) hosted a “Celebrate Tet With U.S. Beef” event in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, Feb. 24 to kick off the return of U.S. beef to that country. Although a small market for U.S. beef—about 22 metric tons in 2002 and 16 in 2003—prior to a ban resulting from the discovery of a single imported animal with BSE in December 2003, it is one of the first Asian countries to reopen to U.S. product. More than 50 U.S. exporters, Vietnamese importers, retailers and restaurant owners, and Vietnamese officials attended the celebration. Seth Winnick, U.S. Consul General; Philip
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
A false case of brucellosis from cattle in Campbell County, WY, could lead to a review of how laboratories nationwide handle tests for the cattle disease in the future, a veterinary official said. I'm quite confident there will be a review of that protocol at a national level," said Sam Holland, chairman of the U.S. Animal Health Association's (USAHA) committee on brucellosis. Holland, who is also the South Dakota state veterinarian, said he requested USDA review federal protocols for culturing brucella nationwide, "in light of the recent event and information gleaned from that experience." Four months ago, the Animal Disease Research and
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
— Second important date in December ‘06. Producers need to plan now to meet two key compliance dates for confined livestock operations next year, a University of Nebraska livestock bioenvironmental engineer said. Both deadlines result from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA’s) recent update on rules dealing with concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs. These rules deal mainly with how manure is managed to protect water quality. The updated rules place more of an emphasis on proper management of animal manure both at the confinement site where it is produced and on farmland where it is applied. By Feb. 13, 2006, all large
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) last Tuesday announced the sale of 200 wild mares to a Wyoming company, the first transaction under new sale authority for wild horses and burros. The new law, which was formally implemented this past December 2004, directs BLM to offer for sale those wild horses and burros that are more than 10 years old or have been unsuccessfully offered up for adoption at least three times. The agency estimates that about 8,400 animals are affected by the new law, this year alone. “As we implement the new sale-authority legislation passed by Congress, we are committed
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
— ‘Cow hay’ to range $50-65, pre-delivery. — Trucking costs could jump, also. More inexpensive hay prices of the past few months may be a distant memory by the middle part of this year as extended feed usage this winter and spring and potential production declines could team up to force short late-year supplies. According to forage market analysts and hay brokers across the Plains and western U.S., high- and average-quality alfalfa hay supplies are tight throughout, and carryover of those supplies will be down by midyear. Sources said that even though on-hand hay stocks in the seven most western states were up
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
The shooting of four cows in north-central Montana was recently solved with information provided through the Montana Livestock Crimestoppers program and the local sheriff's office. The shooting of domestic livestock is just one of the crimes Montana producers face, according to Jack Wiseman, Brands Enforcement Administrator with the Montana Department of Livestock. Others include the alteration of a brand on an animal and theft of livestock from the field or from a sale written with a bad check. The Livestock Crimestoppers program can help solve many of these types of crimes if people are aware of the program and report suspicious
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service recently reported that commercial red meat production in the U.S. totaled 3.65 billion pounds in January, down two percent from the 3.71 billion pounds produced in January 2004. Beef production, at 1.92 billion pounds, was slightly below the previous year. Cattle slaughter totaled 2.53 million head, down two percent from January 2004. The average live weight was up 13 pounds from the previous year, at 1,262 pounds. Veal production totaled 13.3 million pounds, 17 percent below January a year ago. Calf slaughter totaled 67,700 head, down 14 percent from January 2004. The average live weight was seven
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
— Canadian cattle reentry delayed. — Appeal on way to Ninth Circuit. R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America was claiming victory last week as U.S. District Court Judge Richard Cebull, Billings, MT, granted the group’s request for a temporary restraining order against USDA’s planned March 7 reopening of the border to Canadian live cattle. In his written order explaining his ruling, Cebull said, “Plaintiff (R-CALF) has demonstrated the numerous procedural and substantive shortcomings of the USDA’s decision to allow importation of Canadian cattle and beef. The serious irreparable harm that will occur when Canadian cattle and meat enter the U.S. and co-mingle (sic) with
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
As I write this, a judge in a Billings, MT, courthouse is listening to oral arguments over the reopening of the U.S. border to Canadian cattle and other products. Whatever the outcome, it’s timely to look at some of the supply-demand fundamentals that face the U.S. industry this year. Right now, I have some causes for concern. After eight years of herd liquidation, cow-calf producers last year began to retain heifers and rebuild their numbers. This meant the national herd on Jan. 1 was 95.85 million head, up one percent from the previous year. A couple of other numbers are important.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
— More corn acres projected in ‘05. — Good growing weather also expected. There is a very good possibility that feed corn prices later this year could be even lower than prices seen in late 2004 and early 2005 if prospects for more corn acres and very conducive growing conditions come to fruition, grain and cattle market analysts told WLJ last week. According to estimates from commodity committees within USDA, corn plantings for 2005 could be over 82 million acres, the largest figure since 1985. That figure is 1.1 million acres larger than last year, when the nation’s largest corn crop in history
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
The IRS Manual has a section in the Audit Technique Guide entitled “IRC Section 183: Farm Hobby Losses With Cattle Operations and Horse Activities.” The guide is intended to alert IRS auditors to situations pertaining to the horse and cattle industries. The guide says, “Current trends indicate that these two activities, due to their nature, contain certain opportunities for taxpayer abuse.” Auditors are advised, “Many of the taxpayers who potentially fall under the provisions of IRC section 183 with respect to horse and cattle activities have been involved in such activities during their youth. These taxpayers have grown up on
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 7, 2005
Clarifying OCM article Pete, I saw your reference to my OCM article and I wanted to clarify a few things. First, you mentioned that fed cattle prices usually make a big break by August. That is basically true and that was the whole point of my article. With the Canadian border being closed, prices have been much better than normal and we didn’t see the big break in prices in the summer. When the border is opened, fundamentals will return to normal and you had better be prepared for a break in the market. August live cattle have only been over $80 when


Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar
 

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!