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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Jim Schwertner, Capital Land and Livestock, Schwertner, TX, was named the recipient of the Beef Industry Vision Award, presented by the National Cattlemen's Foundation (NCF). The award, sponsored by Ford Motor Company, was presented Saturday, Feb. 5, during the finale event of the 2005 Cattle Industry Annual Convention and Trade Show in San Antonio, TX. The Vision Award was established to recognize outstanding beef industry innovators for each year. The recipient is an individual whose innovation has been incorporated into his or her operation and has enhanced their business and the cattle industry overall. Nominees were evaluated on the basis of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Workers at some Tyson beef plants will continue to be paid to stay home as the company reports that market conditions are not improving. Tyson Foods announced in January that it would temporarily suspend slaughtering operations at plants in Denison, IA; Norfolk and West Point, NE; and Boise, ID, for a period of three to five weeks. A second shift in Pasco, WA, was also suspended. Now, Tyson says that the suspension will last at least five weeks and perhaps longer. Workers were asked to take vacation during the first week of suspension, then were paid for 32 hours of work. During
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
U.S. Ag Secretary Mike Johanns last Wednesday announced USDA has removed beef from cattle 30 months and older from its final rule regarding live cattle and beef imports from minimum BSE risk countries, including Canada. The secretary said plans are still in place to allow Canadian cattle under 30 months of age into the country starting March 7. According to Johanns, the agency will craft a separate rule regarding beef from animals 30 months of age and older and formally release it later this year. “Our ongoing investigations into the recent finds of BSE in Canada in animals over 30 months are
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
A growing population coupled with diminishing fresh water supplies should force major changes in the way the world's farmers tend crops in coming decades, a recent study recommends. Since agriculture uses about 70 percent of the world's fresh water every year, farming should be the focus of intense conservation efforts, Cornell University professor David Pimentel said. "We in the U.S. waste a lot of water in contrast to other people," said Pimentel, whose study appeared in the October issue of the journal BioScience. "Agriculture is going to have to give up water as the population grows," he said. "States like California, Colorado, Texas
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
The federal grazing fee for Western states lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) will be $1.79 per animal unit month (AUM) in 2005, up from $1.43 in 2004. The newly adjusted fee, which takes effect March 1, applies to more than 18,000 grazing permits and leases administered by the BLM and more than 8,000 permits administered by USFS. The formula used for calculating the grazing fee, established by Congress in the 1978 Public Rangelands Improvement Act, has continued under a presidential executive order issued in 1986. Under that order, the grazing fee
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Last year I wrote that Red Bluff is a state of mind. This year I firmly believe that is the case, and has been for many years. The Red Bluff founders had an ideal in mind when they started this famous sale and the succeeding generations have upheld and built upon that ideal. This has not just happened. There is careful planning each year by a group of dedicated and committed cattle and horse producers that keep Red Bluff at the forefront in not only the merchandising of bulls, horses, dogs, and commercial replacement females, but also in the entire
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Last week’s announcement of the Oregon ruling on wolf reclassification sent shock waves through the agriculture community and has producer organizations in the affected states planning their appeal. A federal judge in Oregon ruled last Tuesday that the Bush administration violated the Endangered Species Act when it relaxed protections on some of the gray wolf populations in April 2003. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) divided the wolves range into three areas and reclassified the Eastern and Western populations of wolves as threatened, instead of endangered. Experimental non-essential populations, like those found in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, Idaho and the rest
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
What if a highly infectious, contagious disease such as Hoof-and-Mouth (HMD) was to be found in the U.S.? Would the livestock industry and government officials know how to react and work together? How would the disease be contained and eradicated? The Colorado state veterinarian’s office tried to answer those questions last Tuesday in an exercise involving the governor’s office, several state agencies, producers, law enforcement and many other representatives of affected industries. The exercise focused on the first 36 hours of the emergency, required coordination, resources needed and the appropriate response to control the spread of an outbreak and mitigate the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Saying its members have endured significant and prolonged financial damages because of the ongoing ban on Canadian cattle, the American Meat Institute on Jan. 27 filed a motion seeking a preliminary injunction against USDA in an attempt to end the remaining portions of the 18- month ban on Canadian cattle. The ban on cattle 30 months of age and older has been in place since May 2003 when Canada diagnosed its first domestic case of BSE. "There is no scientific, legal, or logical reason to continue the ban on Canadian cattle," said Mark Dopp, AMI's senior vice president for regulatory affairs and
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Another strong year is expected for beef exports from Australia, a major global supplier, with exports forecast to rise 8.9 percent to 995,000 metric tons from 2004, according to a projection issued last week by marketing concern Meat & Livestock Australia Ltd. However, a major uncertainty in the market is the impact of a lifting of a ban on U.S. beef imports by Japan and South Korea, said Peter Weeks, MLAs chief analyst. If only small quantities of U.S. beef enter Japan and South Korea in 2005, then total Australian exports should comfortably exceed the record of 947,000 tons set in 2001
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
McDonald's triples Q4 profits Strong U.S. sales helped McDonald's Corp. more than triple its fourth-quarter profits to $398 million, capping the fast-food chain's best single-year sales improvement under the Golden Arches in 17 years. Intent on keeping the momentum going, the company raised the possibility Jan. 28 that it might spin off its Chipotle Mexican Grill business. The company extended its nearly two-year hot streak with higher-priced menu additions, later operating hours and the introduction of cashless pay options sent comparable sales up 9.6 percent last year in the United States and contributed to a 6.9 percent improvement worldwide. Tyson buys Oscar
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Treasure Bull Test has now completed the 60 day test on 175 Angus bulls consigned by breeders from eight states. Considering the recent cold weather the bulls are performing extremely well. The 144 spring Angus bulls on test are gaining 3 lbs. per day with an average weight per day of age (ADG) of 3 lbs. The 31 fall bulls have an ADG of 3.13 and post a WDA of 3.13. The test is being conducted at the Broken O Ranch Feedlot, Simms, MT. The top gaining bull at the 60 day mark is Lot 189 on a bull owned by
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
In the beef business, we are proud of our traditions. Producers learn from an early age that hard work and, well, more hard work will get you every edge there is available. Even more importantly, hard work is always honorable. We teach each other the way it is in the business in terms of who is expected to succeed and who is not. Then, as the next generation comes through, we are shocked that the same people are far ahead in the game. Have you ever wondered whether some things stay the same because that is the way we expect them
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Producers have to come to expect a missing calf or two here and there and chalk it up to theft or predators. But when double digit figures of animals that are yearlings and older disappear from a pasture, it’s more than what some Kansas producers can financially endure. It’s possible that the high cattle market is contributing to the rash of cattle thefts in the Midwest. However, those higher prices also mean that more of a loss is incurred by the producer. Most producers do have their cattle insured. But, insurance only pays for the animal, and not the loss of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced proposed regulations to remove restrictions on beef imports. Restrictions were introduced following the detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Washington state on Dec. 23, 2003. Based on the guidelines of the World Organization for Animal Health, the CFIA plans to permit the importation of live cattle born in 1996 or later, beef from animals of any age from which specified risk material has been removed and various other commodities, , according to a news release from the agency. Products that may pose a higher risk, such as certain animal feeds, will remain prohibited. The proposed regulations
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
China expects to export double the corn crop it did last year, while Argentina appears on pace to raise its exportable corn harvest slightly. Corn exports from China will experience a partial revival this year with the government considering more policies to boost overseas sales, state media reports, citing an expert at the National Grain and Oils Information Center. Exports of corn from China are forecast to more than double to 5 million metric tons in the marketing year ending September 2005, the China Daily reports, citing forecasts by an unnamed expert at the center. The center predicts that China's corn output will
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
There is only four weeks left until USDA’s Canadian import plan is to start on March 7. Up till now there hasn’t been much more than a little noise and a few letters from congress persons opposing USDA’s cattle import plans. If congress is going to get in the act, I would expect to see a lot more action very soon. Senators Tim Johnson (D-SD) and Mike Enzi (R-WY) introduced some legislation late last week to keep the Canadian border closed until October 2006 when Country of Origin Labeling kicks in. It will be interesting to see if it makes
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
On Jan. 27, a group of ten industry associations, including National Meat Association, sponsored a conference to analyze the science and risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in North America. Presentations covered epidemiology, animal health, communications, and speakers included experts from the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), as well as several of the sponsoring organizations. Measures under consideration include a ban on Specified Risk Materials (SRMs) in all animal feed or a similar ban on deadstock alone. According to the computer modeling done by Harvard
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has made available instructions to report suspected animals with Foreign Animal Diseases (FADs) such as BSE, Avian Influenza and hoof-and-mouth disease and other conditions to Public Health Veterinarians (PHVs). These instructions (FSIS Directive 6000.1) outline the responsibilities of PHVs associated with identifying and reporting suspected incidences of FADs. Also included is a of possible symptoms—Signs of FADs list—that provides further information at both ante-mortem and postmortem inspections. Upon inspection, Public Health Veterinarians are to consider animals exhibiting these signs as "U.S. Suspects" and are to contact the district office of the FSIS as


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