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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Last month's announcement that a moderately-large-scale Tama, IA, cattle and beef processing facility was being shuttered, at least temporarily, brought back a lot of not-so-fond memories concerning independent cattle producers and the hard time they seem to have getting started in the packing business. The most alarming thing to me about the 1,200-head-per-day-capacity Iowa Quality Beef cooperative's situation is
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
A large crowd of nearly 400 cattle people attended the Hagata Ranch Centennial Celebration, September 4, Susanville, CA. Located some 100 miles north of Reno, NV, off Highway 395, Frank Hagata's father, John, founded the ranch in 1904 in Lassen County, one of the premier ranching counties in the state. In attendance was a big crowd of mostly ranch people. Everything for the day was
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Producer organizations and industry officials agree, implementing a National Animal Identification Program (NAIP) is not going to be an easy task. For producers to start tagging every animal, and for data to be collected and kept for those animals in every segment of the production chain, there's going to be challenges to face. In particular, auction markets may be given the largest share of the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
— U.S. beef acceptance still down the road. — Japan's 12th case no factor. Japanese government officials last Wednesday formally announced that they would exempt cattle under 20 months of age from being tested for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). However, the entry of U.S. beef into Japan will be delayed until the two countries can agree on the science, or verification
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Japan and Mexico are signing a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) this week, which will mark the first time Tokyo has made a comprehensive pact involving agriculture products. This landmark treaty is beneficial to both sides, giving Mexican farmers more export opportunities, and Japanese auto and steelmakers more access to the Mexican market with a reduction in tariffs. Over 300 agriculture products in total are covered
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
— RFID program adds value to calves. While a large portion of cattle industry participants have been waiting on a nationwide program before starting to implement an individual animal identification system, one central Plains livestock auction took a more proactive approach and is ahead of the livestock ID curve. This past June, Joplin Regional Stockyards, Joplin, MO, held a special late
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski would like to see wolves back in Oregon although the species has been extirpated from the state for more than 50 years. Last year, Kulongoski commissioned the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to draft a plan for wolf reintroduction. The 14-member committee appointed to advise and develop a draft a Wolf Management Plan concluded their scheduled meetings last week,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Beginning October 1, a second dairy cow retirement will be put into implementation in order to reduce national milk supplies and spike sputtering milk prices. Several beef market analysts said that while the program will ruffle some cow/calf producers' feathers, that the program will probably not hurt the beef market that much, if any. According to officials in charge of Cooperatives Working Together (CWT),
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
— Frosts ignored by agency; analysts still uncertain. — Grain price down early, but recovering last week. In its most recent crop production forecast, released Friday, September 10, USDA's National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS) dismissed most fears about early frosts in several northern-tier corn states and projected an 11 billion bushel corn crop, a record by over 800 million bushels. The
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Looking into the future is tricky business. As renowned economist Peter Drucker once said, "Forecasting future trends is a somewhat futile exercise. The best we can do is to take trends that are already occurring and extrapolate them into the future." The following trends and projections represent a consensus of numerous analysts in every beef industry sector, from seedstock to consumer. These trends,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
Researchers have isolated a strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with the potential to not only reduce meat spoilage, but also reduce contamination by food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7 and listeria monocytogenes. "Meat processors tell us that one of their biggest concerns is LAB," said Dr. Frances Nattress, an Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researcher based in Lacombe. "Processors say that LAB are a frequent
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
Public Citizen, a national nonprofit consumer advocacy organization, continues to play the part of the Achilles heal for the USDA and its effort to get irradiated beef fully accepted by the country. Since March 2003, before irradiated beef was approved for the National School Lunch Program, Public Citizen made four separate attempts to persuade the government to provide "more accurate information, about irradiated
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
The Cal Poly Bull Test final report from San Luis Obispo, CA, completed its 120-day weight period on September 4, 2004. There were 31 Low Birth Angus, with the Test Ave. ADG 3.74, and the Test Ave. WDA for the breed was 3.09. In the Multi-trait Angus there were 56 animals with the Test Ave. ADG 4.04, and the Test Ave. WDA for the breed was 3.21. Angus numbered 96,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
Last weeks fed market started out with packers and cattle feeders being $5-7 apart, which didn't produce much through Thursday, only 50,000 head had traded nationwide. Nebraska dressed trade was light and traded at mostly $80 live, $127 dressed, steady with a week earlier. Most cattle feeders were asking $83-84 live, and $132 dressed, while packers seemed content to bid $78-79 live, $126-128 dressed. Packers
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
—Truth is not being told, say scientists Three Health Canada veterinary drug bureau scientists fired in July for insubordination have suggested their real offence had been lobbying for stronger government anti-BSE rules, including an end to feeding animal protein to animals. The official reason for their dismissal has not been made public by Health Canada. The three scientists, Shiv Chopra,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
China's consumption of beef is forecast to continue climbing due to strong growth in per capita income, according to USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS). Since December 25, 2003, China has banned imported U.S. cattle and beef due to a single case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the U.S. It still remains uncertain when China will lift the bans. During 2004, USDA
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
China's consumption of beef is forecast to continue climbing due to strong growth in per capita income, according to USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS). Since December 25, 2003, China has banned imported U.S. cattle and beef due to a single case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the U.S. It still remains uncertain when China will lift the bans. During 2004, USDA
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
— Freeze damage unknown. — Near-term prices hinge on USDA report. By Steven D. Vetter WLJ Editor Commodity grain and livestock analysts have both been feverishly trying to figure out if late August and early September reports of early frosts, even a freeze, in several northern tier states were accurate and whether or not 2004 corn
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 13, 2004
By Sarah L. Swenson WLJ Associate Editor DNA testing is becoming more and more familiar to the beef industry for use as a selection tool. But, what about as a means to solve crimes? Thanks to the efforts of a Montana sheriff department, this tool can and will now be used to solve heinous crimes involving livestock. Ken and Dawn Overcast were


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