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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
The way animals are raised for food needs to be urgently changed in an attempt to prevent a possible global flu pandemic that could kill millions of people, a senior World Health Organization official said Friday, Nov. 26. Shigeru Omi, Western Pacific regional director of WHO, said bird flu could cause the next global pandemic, and efforts to control it must begin with farming methods. “I believe we are closer now to a pandemic than at any time recent years," Omi said. He said the current outbreak of bird flu in poultry is "historically unprecedented in terms of geographical spread and impact," the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
The feast or famine scenario is never far away for those in the beef business. Ironically, the same scenario is evident in the crop business. Generally, crop producers are very market focused, entwining farm program concerns, management options, and individual will to come up with an annual approach to production. The triad of producer inputs generally produces a crop output that has a home,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
The United States Mint recently announced it was releasing a new limited-edition nickel in 2005 featuring an American bison and a newly-designed image of Thomas Jefferson. The National Bison Association (NBA) called the announcement "a dynamic tribute to the heritage and the future of this great American symbol." "We are excited, not only by the announcement, but also by the beautiful
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
A Brazilian government delegation came away emptied handed from meetings with Russian authorities to convince them to lift a ban on Brazilian meat imports following an outbreak of hoof-and-mouth disease (HMD) in the Amazon region, Brazil's agriculture ministry said last Thursday. "They were very firm and gave no indication of when the embargo may end," said Agriculture Minister Roberto Rodrigues.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
With winter fast approaching, the National Park Service (NPS) and Wyoming Fish and Game Department (WFGD) are putting some serious thought into a brucellosis vaccination program for free-roaming elk and bison herds. Topping the list of available technology are "biobullets," a vaccine delivered from a pneumatic rifle. If this plan is approved, it will be the first vaccination of free-roaming bison in the Yellowstone National
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
After a successful trial run in five colleges and universities, cattle marketing specialists with Denver-based Cattle-Fax recently announced broad-scale availability of its Beef Executive Seminar Training (BEST) program to universities and colleges nationwide. The course is designed to increase students' knowledge of marketing and risk-management concepts and principles, while using course information and applications to replicate business decisions in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
— Marketings could mean $86-plus feds. — Placements down third straight month. Market analysts were quick to call USDA's September 1 Cattle-on-Feed (CoF) Report, released September 17, supportive to both the cattle futures complex and the cash fed cattle market. Leading the optimism was last month's double-digit-percentage drop in August feedlot placements, compared to 2003, and an August marketing figure
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold, D-WI, last week urged USDA to offer more technical assistance for producers willing to use their land for conservation practices. In a letter to USDA Secretary Ann Veneman, Feingold wrote that because of the administration's decision to not reimburse Natural Resource Conservation Service staff, who assist producers in making decisions when signing up for the Conservation Reserve Program, some Wisconsinites
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
— Next labeling effort not expected until ‘05. A last minute amendment to the Senate's proposed $84 billion agriculture appropriations bill to move up the implementation date of mandatory country-of-origin-labeling (COOL) from September 30, 2006, to January 1, 2005, died last week when a Senate Appropriation Committee vote tied 14-14. Congressional aides and Washington, DC, lobbyists doubted that any further
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
"When you can't work harder, you have to work smarter." That age-old advice has never been more appropriate than today's busy life on the ranch, with time, money, and man-power getting harder to come by. Many ranchers are turning to well-trained cowdogs to fill the gap, with growing interest in a composite breed known as Hangin' Tree Cowdogs. These dogs and their ability to perform
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
— Washington, Oregon, Idaho affected. — Announcement less than expected. For the second time this month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced critical habitat designation for a federally protected species in an effort to comply with a court order. Like the last time, environmentalists have stated displeasure with the announcement while ranching interests are taking a wait-and-see approach
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
Europeans eat less of the most dangerous, cholesterol-raising fats than Americans do and the amount is decreasing, according to a report released September 2 by the European Food Safety Authority, reports the Associated Press. Scientists at the European Food Safety Authority declined to say whether the EU should follow the U.S.' lead and require special labels on margarine, chips,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) recently published a formal notice urging livestock processors to use a more systematic approach to ensure they are meeting the requirements of the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act (HMSA). In addition, the agency said it will be quicker to levy penalties against processors that violate HMSA rules and that don't actively work to remedy "inhumane" procedures.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 27, 2004
Nebraska, Minnesota and Texas schools have all pulled their standing orders for irradiated beef this school year as USDA contends suppliers continue to charge too much for the product. According to USDA, suppliers were still asking approximately $2.50 per pound for irradiated hamburger and ground beef, as early as the first week of September. That price is almost 75 cents more than the cost for
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
— Cost, time, labor remain primary deterrents. Japan's announcement that they will open the borders to beef from animals proven to be under 20 months of age could certainly push along efforts to implement a mandatory national animal identification program (NAIP). But, is every segment of the beef industry ready for a mandatory ID program? One thing is for certain, auction markets are stuck in the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
USDA's Agriculture Research Service (ARS) is in the process of developing a gene bank of at least 50 unrelated sires from every recognized breed of cattle. These embryos and semen are being kept in case of a disease outbreak and also as a means for genetic research. Harvey Blackburn, geneticist and coordinator of the Fort Collins, CO, based National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation said
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
U.S. beef imports from Canada are not making up for the fed cattle that were being brought across the border for slaughter before they were blocked in May 2003 when bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was discovered north of the border. Currently, only boneless beef from young cattle is allowed to cross the border. No live cattle may enter the U.S. from Canada, and even certain
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Calgary's City Council, on the night of Monday, September 13, deferred consideration until January 2005 of a meat-packing plant, which had already received technical approval from Calgary's planning commission. The decision came just days after the Canadian government pledged millions in aid for more slaughterhouses to deal with the glut of cattle from the BSE crisis. Few of the slaughterhouse
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
What does a state's beef industry do when its promotion dollars limit it to approximately four cents a consumer, not enough to even cover the cost of a postage stamp? That was the question that came up during an interview with Bruce Berven, outgoing executive director of the California Beef Council (CBC), and Virginia Coelho, CBC board member, during the Hagata Ranch Centennial Celebration,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 20, 2004
Canadian Agriculture Minister Andy Mitchell announced an aid package of almost a half a billion dollars September 10 for Canadian cattle producers devastated by the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad-cow disease, crisis. Once consultations have been completed, Mitchell said, the federal investment will total C$488 million dollars. Analysts ahead of the announcement had been expecting new money in the


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