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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
After several victories concerning the Endangered Species Act (ESA) last year, the western ranching industry was dealt a serious blow earlier this year when a Northwest federal court judge ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) violated the act when it relaxed protections on “threatened” wolves. Under the ruling from U.S. District Court Judge Robert E. Jones, Portland, OR, FWS violated the ESA when it implemented a rule allowing ranchers to shoot wolves on sight if they were attacking livestock. That new rule changed the status of several populations of wolves, both domestic and reintroduced species, to “threatened” instead of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
— Other southern states prepping fields. — Northern harvest still incomplete. Planting of the 2005 corn crop officially became active in Texas last week, about a week to 10 days behind “normal.” However, some sources said while abnormally wet weather slowed seeding in the South, it could result in abnormally high average yields across that part of the country. USDA commodity reporters, grain market analysts and agronomists alike said the extremely wet weather in the southern third of the U.S. will improve corn yields and the overall corn harvest in that area. “Even if moisture is below normal, subsoil conditions are so good right
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Allendale Inc. is expecting Thursday's U.S. Department of Agriculture March supply and demand report to show an increase in domestic corn ending stocks. U.S. wheat ending stocks are pegged at 548 million bushels, which would be 10 million lower than the February report. Corn stocks are seen at 2.045 billion bushels, compared to 2.01 billion in the last report. Domestic soybean stocks are estimated at 455 million bushels. February's report had bean stocks at 440 million. World wheat ending stocks are estimated at 145.12 million tons, compared to 145.38 million in the previous report. Corn ending stocks are pegged at 119.42 million
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Pork, dairy, poultry and egg producers have until May 1 to decide whether to sign a consent agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. After a series of court cases, the EPA announced in January that federal air quality laws would retroactively apply to certain livestock production facilities. Applicable regulations include the Clean Air Act; Comprehensive Environmental Responses, Compensation and Liability Act; and Environmental Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act provisions. Livestock producers need to be aware of this consent agreement with the EPA and familiarize themselves with existing EPA air quality regulations, said Rick Koelsch, University of Nebraska livestock bio-environmental engineer. "This issue
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Bureau of Land Management Director Kathleen Clarke announced a sale on Wednesday of 13 wild horses to Lifesavers Wild Horse Rescue, a California-based group dedicated to wild horse protection. The horses, all mares, were sold under a new law that Congress passed in December 2004. The new law directs the BLM to sell wild horses and burros that are more than 10 years old or have been unsuccessfully offered for adoption at least three times. The BLM announced its first sale of wild horses on March 1; that sale involved 200 mares and went to Wild Horses Wyoming, LLC, a southeastern
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Bernard Vallat, the director general of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), said his group would use scientific means to help settle a beef trade dispute between Japan and the United States, according to a Reuters’ news report. Vallat added that the OIE was ready to mediate talks if both countries made the request. Japan banned imports of U.S. beef in December 2003 after the United States discovered its only case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Japan insisted that the U.S. test all of the cattle presented for slaughter for BSE. In October 2004, the two countries agreed to resume shipments of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
A general agreement that a U.S. cattle identification and traceability system should be mandatory with a goal of 100-percent compliance was reached by more than 200 industry leaders attending the 2005 International Livestock Congress March 2-3 in Houston, TX. The group, consisting of cattlemen, academics, trade associations, industry service providers, government representatives, and international guests, agreed that the system should be electronic with limited and controlled access to data by governments, as well as begin with the birth of calves and extend to packing plants, and should initially focus on providing the necessary information to contain animal health crises. Following presentations outlining
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
A U.S. District Court judge recently denied a request for a preliminary injunction against USDA’s ban against Canadian live cattle 30 months or older. Judge John Garrett Penn’s ruling may end American Meat Institute’s (AMI) lawsuit asking for the U.S. Canadian border to be reopened to all types of Canadian cattle and beef. However, AMI officials were awaiting Penn’s written order to see if there were any avenues of appeal worth pursuing. As of press time last Thursday, Penn had still not released his written ruling denying the injunction request. Legal sources, however, said Penn’s decision probably was based on the previous week’s
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
— USDA awaiting appeal to Ninth Circuit. — Court case timeline still unknown. In his written order granting a temporary injunction against reopening the border to Canadian live cattle, U.S. District Judge Richard Cebull, Billings, MT, indicated the group filing the legal challenge against USDA’s final import rule appears to have some standing in its arguments. In his analysis, Cebull indicated he addressed the question, “Is plaintiff substantially likely to prevail on the merits?” Within that analysis Cebull’s order indicated he addressed several sub-questions that led him to grant the temporary restraining order, which was requested by R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America (R-CALF). Among
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Time is running out to enter the 26th National Beef Cook-Off. Family chefs are encouraged to show off their “skill-ets” in the kitchen and submit their favorite beef recipes by March 31. This summer, 20 amateur family chefs will be notified that their beef recipes have made them national finalists. The finalists will compete Sept. 19-21 in Rapid City, SD for the $50,000 “Best of Beef” grand prize and eight other cash prizes. More than $100,000 will be awarded. On behalf of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and the Federation of State Beef Councils, the American National CattleWomen, Inc. are partnering with retail
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
On March 1, Democrats in the Indiana House of Representatives walked out, effectively bringing the legislative session to a halt and resulting in the procedural death of over 130 bills. Several key pieces of agricultural legislation were lost. Funding for a new Colts stadium and a provision to move the state to daylight savings time were also among the measures that died. The director of the soon-to-be Department of Agriculture blasted House Democrats for not showing up to do their work and, in effect, killing the bills that would have directly benefitted Hoosier farmers and ag producers. “The House Democrats played games, and
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Support for AFBF waning Dear Editor: We are very disappointed with the American Farm Bureau Federation for their opposition to the ruling by the U.S. District Court for the District of Montana that imposes a temporary injunction on re-establishing trade with Canada for live cattle younger than 30 months of age. Our fourth generation family ranch has been very active with Farm Bureau for over 60 years and we feel that they have really let the U.S. cattle ranching industry down! The Canadian border needs to be closed until we have ALL our beef export markets are open and the safety of the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Allen Green, state conservationist of the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Lewis Frank, state executive director of the Farm Service Agency (FSA), recently announced the availability $2 million dollars for the Grassland Reserve Program (GRP) in Colorado. The GRP is designed to help landowners protect grasslands from conversion to other uses and to support continued stewardship on viable, working ranch lands. Applications received through March 25 will be considered for the limited 2005 funding. “Land eligibility is fairly straightforward,” said Dennis Alexander, assistant state conservationist for programs. “Land to be enrolled in the program must be grassland, contain forbs or shrubland, or
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Arizona cattleman, Swayze McCraine of Prescott was named 2005 Cattleman of the Year by the Arizona Hereford Association at ceremonies opening the organization’s 31st annual bull sale during Cattlemen’s weekend. McCraine, raised in Baton Rouge, LA, and a Louisiana State University animal science degree graduate, worked for Great Plains Western Corporation a mutli-faceted company with ranches in six states. He became vice president in five years. In 1978 he took over his family’s ranching operation in Mississippi, raising registered Brangus and commercial cattle. Six years later he moved to Prescott to be involved with his wife’s family ranch. In 1986 the Arizona
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Arizona cattleman, Swayze McCraine of Prescott was named 2005 Cattleman of the Year by the Arizona Hereford Association at ceremonies opening the organization’s 31st annual bull sale during Cattlemen’s weekend. McCraine, raised in Baton Rouge, LA, and a Louisiana State University animal science degree graduate, worked for Great Plains Western Corporation a mutli-faceted company with ranches in six states. He became vice president in five years. In 1978 he took over his family’s ranching operation in Mississippi, raising registered Brangus and commercial cattle. Six years later he moved to Prescott to be involved with his wife’s family ranch. In 1986 the Arizona
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns announced March 4 that the number two man at the department will be leaving. “Deputy Secretary James Moseley has informed me that he is resigning as Deputy Secretary effective today. He has served American agriculture well throughout an extensive and diverse career and I wish him well in his future endeavors,” Johanns said in a statement. Moseley was asked to join USDA by Ann Veneman and, since her resignation speculation has been running high on Moseley’s future. In January, Moseley said he planned to stay on through the transition, but “my future is uncertain.” During that interview,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Paul L. Good Paul Good, 89, a renowned livestock auctioneer died March 6. From Van Wert, OH, Good was born Feb. 23, 1916, to George Lewis and Dora Leota Haines Good. He married his highschool sweetheart Alice Marie Poling in 1938; she died May 7, 1989. Good graduated from Ohio State where he was a member of the Collegiate Livestock Judging Team and Meats Team, and started as an auctioneer in seventh grade during a school pageant depicting the Jamestown slave auction. Colonel Good is best known for his robust and quick-witted selling of Angus cattle, presiding over some of the most notable
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
With “tax day” fast approaching, the agriculture industry is optimistic that Congress will consider a permanent repeal of the estate tax soon after April 15. The House bill (H.R. 8) and Senate bill (S. 420) are identical versions of the bill introduced in the 109th Congress, which, if passed, would permanently repeal this tax and do away with the sunset clause in current law. So far, the House bill has over 100 cosponsors and the Senate bill has seven. H.R. 8 is numbered lower than 10, showing that this legislation is a leadership bill, which means the House leadership is placing
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
— Other southern states prepping fields. — Northern harvest still incomplete. Planting of the 2005 corn crop officially became active in Texas last week, about a week to 10 days behind “normal.” However, some sources said while abnormally wet weather slowed seeding in the South, it could result in abnormally high average yields across that part of the country. USDA commodity reporters, grain market analysts and agronomists alike said the extremely wet weather in the southern third of the U.S. will improve corn yields and the overall corn harvest in that area. “Even if moisture is below normal, subsoil conditions are so good right
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
A House “companion” bill to prevent the U.S. from lifting its ban on Canadian live cattle isn't expected to move quickly to a floor vote like its counterpart did in the Senate earlier this month, according to congressional aides and government officials. Alise Kowalski, spokeswoman for House Agriculture Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R- VA, said last Tuesday the bill will likely remain idle in the committee until after a legal suit being herd in federal court on the U.S. ban has been resolved. And that suits USDA, which is adamantly opposed to the bill. USDA sought to begin allowing in Canadian cattle


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