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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Australia has suspended imports of beef from Brazil after a suspected case of hoof-and-mouth disease (HMD). The case has been reported on a property in a state of the country which had been recognized as HMD free. Australia’s Minister for Agriculture Warren Truss said Australia has only ever imported a small sample of Brazilian beef for processing, but all import permits have now been canceled. “We do not import beef from Brazil in any quantities and so there's no likelihood of there being significant quantities coming into Australia," he said. “But any risk is too much risk in these circumstances, and so all import
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Promo boosts steak sales A recently-concluded 15-week retail promotion resulted in a spike in sales of steak cuts most commonly grilled, according to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. The promotion was said to have contributed to a 2.2 percent gain in unit sales over the summer and an 8.2 percent increase in dollar sales. Radio advertising and in-store promotions, as well as a partnership with Kraft's A-1 steak sauce, which gave away grills to contest winners, were some of the high points of the promotion. The promotion ran in 44 U.S. markets from May through Labor Day and was funded by
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Brazil’s meat industry is looking to consolidate on a spectacular year of growth in 2004, cementing its position as the world’s largest meat exporter. Beef, chicken and pork exporters saw orders grow despite a recent import ban by Russia, its largest client, and continuing restrictions on Brazilian meat in the Far East. Meat shipments are expected to total $5.8 billion in 2004, some 42 percent higher than 2003, with physical sales expected to reach 4.2 million metric tons, 23 percent higher than the year before. The challenge for Brazil’s industry is to take advantage of the continuing sanitary problems in competing countries and
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
— Export, domestic demand both helped. While the Dec. 23, 2003 confirmation of BSE being found in a cow located in Washington-state turned the U.S. cattle industry on its ear, the U.S. pork industry found the ramification from that situation much more to its liking. According to Chris Hurt, livestock economist at the University of Purdue, that single case of BSE was almost singlehandedly responsible for one of the biggest pork market turnarounds in U.S. history. Hurt remembers that the U.S. hog market started out 2004 with cash prices mostly in the $30 range. By April, prices had risen significantly as export
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
— Earliest date to apply in April 25. California cattle producers are hopeful that 2005 brings fewer bovine tuberculosis (TB) testing requirements and that restrictions on shipping cattle across state lines will be significantly lessened. Currently, the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) projects it will ask USDA to consider reinstating TB-free status for the state in late April. The first day the state can do that, according to federal regulations, is April 25, and the process USDA would then go through is expected to be at least three months, if not a little longer. The date for reapplying could be
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) last Wednesday announced Canadian live cattle destined for slaughter and all classes of Canadian beef would be allowed reentry into the U.S. starting March 7, pending no more positive cases of BSE are found north of the border before that deadline. Questions surrounding Canada’s ability to meet the no more BSE infection criteria surfaced later that day after the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announced that preliminary testing indicated a 10-year-old cow could be infected with the disease. If confirmatory tests come back positive for the disease, it is unlikely Canadian producers will be allowed
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
The Canadian cattle import rule was announced last week by USDA and the intention is to resume full beef and cattle trade with Canada starting March 7. The announcement comes one year after the U.S. found its Canadian case of BSE and nearly 19 months after Canada announced its first case of the disease. Last Wednesday’s announcement will, without doubt, cause an immediate reaction from R-CALF USA who is expected to file an injunction to the rule stating that a previous risk assessment of Canada’s BSE measures is not valid and that the Canadian feed ban has not been adequately implemented. The
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Socorro County, New Mexico, 4-H members are lending a hand with an innovative project to furnish water for livestock and wildlife. The project, at a silt-filled earthen water tank at the Ligon Ranch, is a chance for 4-H and FFA members and other students at nearby Socorro High School to learn about topics ranging from wildlife habitats to sophisticated global positioning system (GPS) equipment. For sophomore Jacob Finch, it’s a chance to add to his knowledge of range plants. Finch already has some expertise as he took second place last summer in range management competition at the State 4-H Conference at New
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Beef producers have a lot to be thankful for as the industry turns its back on one of the most momentous years in its history. Most importantly, there have been no more BSE cases discovered in the U.S. since the first case was announced on Dec. 23, 2003. That is despite a significant ramp-up in BSE testing by USDA. Since it began its enhanced surveillance testing on June 1, it had tested just under 153,000 samples by Dec. 22 and found no more positives. The testing reinforces USDA’s and industry’s view that BSE is not prevalent in the U.S. In fact,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
The voting period for the lamb referendum will be Jan. 31 through Feb. 28, according to the notice published in the Dec. 27 issue of the Federal Register. USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) also announced the final referendum rules under the Lamb Promotion, Research and Information Order, more commonly known as the American Lamb Board or Lamb Checkoff Program. “We are pleased that the voting period has been scheduled. The effort that countless individuals and USDA have generated to get to this point is incredible,” said Spence Rule, chairman of the American Lamb Board. The referendum will be conducted at USDA's
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
As 2005 starts up, real estate brokers across Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona indicated they are busy helping prospective ranch buyers look for properties to purchase, however, they are having difficulty locating extremely large ranches, which are in highest demand. “We just can’t find tracts big enough right now for our clients,” said Nancy Wendland, Wendland & Associates, Kerrville, TX. “When I say big, I mean big. Five thousand acres are small ranch properties in this area right now, and aren’t big enough for most interested ranch buyers.” She said that 20,000-acre ranches are about the smallest that out-of-area ranchers
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Most cattle cycles last 10 years, but the current cycle has lasted 14 years. Why is this cycle longer than normal? What will the next cycle look like? Cattle cycles have been measured for more than 100 years. There are actually three components to a cycle—the cattle inventory, beef production and the cattle price cycle. Cattle inventory cycles experience periods of increasing numbers called accumulation phases and periods of decreasing numbers called liquidation phases. Beef production cycles lag inventory cycles by about a year because, to liquidate numbers, more cattle must be slaughtered. To accumulate numbers, fewer cattle are slaughtered. Price cycles are
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
USDA last week was sued by a packer organization because last week’s announcement reopening the U.S. border to some Canadian slaughter cattle starting in early March did not include cattle, specifically cows, over the age of 30 months. According to the American Meat Institute (AMI), continuing to enforce a ban on importing older cattle is “arbitrary and capricious,”and has no legal or scientific justification. Last Thursday’s filing of the suit came a day after USDA announced a new rule affecting beef and cattle imports from Canada. A full ban on Canadian live cattle and bone-in beef dates back to May 2003,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
New West Nile virus treatment Colorado Serum Company recently introduced its West Nile Virus Antibody, Equine Origin, for use in controlling West Nile Virus (WNV) in horses. It is recommended that veterinarians use the West Nile Virus Antibody when the disease is detected in an unvaccinated horse or a vaccinated horse that has contracted the disease. Administered intravenously, West Nile Virus Antibody will enhance an animal’s ability to fight the virus by neutralizing it, and aid in the overall treatment. Unlike other WNV antibody treatments, this product is concentrated, purified and ready to use straight from the bottle—offering veterinarians an easy
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
— Online purchases to remain slow. Ranch real estate brokers and estate auction companies are indicating that online bidding for extensive ranch and recreational properties has grown by leaps and bounds. In fact, several sources said they wouldn’t be surprised if 50 percent of interested investors would choose to bid via the Internet or other electronic avenues by the end of 2005. “That doesn’t mean that half of all ranch auction acquisitions would be made through online bidding, but it does mean a lot more bidding competition would come from prospective buyers unable to attend a one-day auction or if an auction
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Fed beef trade was slow and cautious last week. Cattle feeders appeared to think they were in the driver’s seat and were wanting to make packers pay more for their slaughter needs than the week previous. However, as of Thursday at noon, packers were not coming to the table with more than $90 per cwt. In fact, most bids were $88-89 across the country. For the week, as of press time Thursday, 10-12,000 head of cattle traded in northern feeding areas at mostly $139 dressed, while Texas sellers had moved only 2-3,000 head at $88 live. Most trade during the week leading
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
U.S. retail grocers appear to be planning for a return to beef featuring in early January, said market analysts and meat buyers who based their opinions on wholesale buying patterns and live cattle and hog markets. After pushing pork and turkey hard for two months, many retailers typically like to go back with a beef ad in January, analysts and buyers said. Specific products tend to be different than they would be in the spring or summer, but it's still beef. Retail grocery advertising circulars in the coming weeks are likely to focus on a mix of products with no real feature
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
The state is proposing to vaccinate bison that stray from Yellowstone National Park, a move intended to help prevent the spread of disease to Montana cattle. But some activists oppose the Livestock Department’s plan, questioning the vaccine’s efficacy. The debate heats up each winter, when some Yellowstone bison wander off in search of food. Ranchers in Montana worry the animals will transmit brucellosis, a disease that can cause cattle to abort their pregnancies. Activists contend the fear is unjustified. “Why throw taxpayer money down the drain to keep a handful of ranchers happy?” said Mike Mease of the Buffalo Field Campaign. Steve Pilcher, executive
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Real estate specialists are predicting that 2005 will continue to be strong and steady for farm and ranch land sales in the southern parts of the U.S. They attribute this continuance to the scarcity of land in these states. Richard Johnson, an associate broker with Arizona-based Tucson Realty & Trust Co., said that agriculture lands are still escalating for two reasons. One is because cattle prices are remaining high and the second is because developers are actively pursuing land for open space and home building. Johnson cited a run on property along interstate 10 between Tucson and Pheonix and said that
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 3, 2005
Ewe lamb applications due USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) posted the Final Rule for the 2004 Ewe Lamb Replacement and Retention Payment Program (ELRRPP) in the Dec. 23 Federal Register. The rule announced that the application period for the program will end January 13, 2005. The program was designed to encourage the replacement and retention of the ewe-lamb breeding stock in the U.S. ELRRPP provides direct payments to producers at a rate of $18 per ewe retained in the base period from Aug. 1, 2003, through July 31, 2004. Total payments to this program cannot exceed $18 million. In the event


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