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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
An attempt to increase business in Chicago Mercantile Exchange electronic livestock futures may be having the opposite effect. To begin the year, the CME instituted a lead market maker program for electronic livestock futures to increase on-screen liquidity and volume. So far, electronic live cattle futures have put up the best volume numbers, with 418 contracts traded last Thursday. But, many traditional CME cattle pit traders who fill orders by open outcry are not happy with one feature of the new program. As an incentive to attract CME e-livestock lead market makers, an approved LMM is allowed to match a pre-existing
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
Argentina's 2005 beef exports will hit at least $1.3 billion, Agriculture Secretary Miguel Campos said last Wednesday. This would put beef exports up about $300 million from 2004, Campos said, noting that Argentina is currently shipping beef to 85 countries. Beef sales have been on the rise since 2003, when they totaled 379,366 tons, or $694 million, according to Argentina’s animal and food health agency, also known as Senasa. “Beef exports are rising and they will continue to rise," Campos said. "Production is up and it will continue to rise to meet demand.” Last Tuesday the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) declared northern
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 17, 2005
A few days after Canada announced its latest case of (BSE) Canadian Chief Veterinary Officer Brian Evans visited the U.S. starting last Wednesday in an effort to convince Congress and government officials that Canadian cattle and beef are safe. Canada reported two new cases of BSE in less than two weeks—Jan. 2 and Jan. 11—and shortly after USDA unveiled a new rule that is scheduled to lift the U.S. ban on Canadian cattle by March 7. Several U.S. lawmakers reacted to both new Canadian cases by demanding the USDA withdraw the new rule, but Evans told reporters Thursday his message is: "The
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 17, 2005
— Significant downturn unlikely also. Cheaper-than-normal feed corn prices are expected to remain in place through at least the first half of the year, as 2004 production and end-of-year stocks were both higher than previously forecasted. Several market analysts, however, didn’t think prices would drop much more either as corn exports and domestic ethanol demand this year are expected to eclipse 2004 levels. According to USDA’s latest crop production forecast, the 2004 corn harvest is expected to total 11.81 billion bushels, 50 million bushels more than was projected in November and 1.7 billion bushels more than the previous record harvest of 2003.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 17, 2005
A hunter in Michigan was diagnosed with a rare human case of bovine tuberculosis after he cut his hand while gutting an infected deer, state health officials said. He is the first living person diagnosed with the strain of bovine tuberculosis that has been found in some northern Michigan deer and cattle in recent years, said T. J. Bucholz, spokesman for the Michigan Department of Community Health. The disease, which is difficult for humans to get but highly contagious in animals, has saddled farmers with costly testing requirements and limits to how they market their cattle in neighboring states. Officials would not
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Findings from an Internet survey indicate future farm success will involve farmers and ranchers and their cooperatives knowing how to effectively manage the Internet for marketing. That was the sentiment registered by 86 percent of individuals responding to an on-line survey conducted by National Farmers Union, a general farm organization representing more than a quarter of a million farm families nationwide and headquartered in metro Denver. “The purpose of this survey was to find out from farmers, ranchers and rural citizens ways they may be using the Internet and its relevance to their farm business and local cooperatives,” said Jeff Moser,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Between February and March, Argentina's National Agriculture Health and Quality Service, known as Senasa, will vaccinate cattle with a formula that includes an antigen to protect against virus C, a variant of the highly infectious and fast-spreading disease. The formula also will include antigens against viruses A and O, La Nacion reported. The effort will be carried out in Formosa and Salta, northern provinces bordering Bolivia and Paraguay, with the aim to avert another outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in its herd of 50 million to 55 million cattle from cutting beef exports because of sanitation requirements in foreign markets. “We
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Lone Star reports earnings Lone Star Steakhouse & Saloon, Inc. reported fourth quarter earnings were up for all its restaurants except for Lone Star Steakhouse and Saloon which ended the fourth quarter down 1.7 percent. Positive fourth quarter earnings include Sullivan’s Steakhouse, 3.1 percent, Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House, 17 percent, and Texas Land & Cattle Steak House, 7.9 percent. Year ending results were up for all its restaurants—Lone Star Steakhouse and Saloon, 0.6 percent, Sullivan’s Steakhouse, 5.6 percent, Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House, 23.2 percent and Texas Land & Cattle Steak House, 9.9 percent. Company earnings were up
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Total direct costs of production in 2005 will increase more than 10 percent for most crops because of higher fertilizer and fuel expenses, according to Andrew Swenson, North Dakota State University Extension Service farm management specialist. Fertilizer is typically the largest and most volatile direct cost of crop production. Fertilizer prices are higher because of energy costs and global demand. Unfortunately, this coincides with low levels of soil nitrogen throughout the state, except for the southwest region. This means more of the expensive fertilizer is necessary for the same yield goal of a year ago. Fuel costs are also sharply higher
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Two U.S. and two Canadian representatives spoke to a group of producers, press and spectators in the International business at the 2005 National Western Stock Show. The topic of the meeting was the issues surrounding the reopening of the Canadian border. Each of the speakers addressed the economic impact, trade relations, how to deal with future trade disruption, as well as national animal identification. Skylar Houston, a producer and chairman of the National Western Stock Show International Agri Business Committee mediated the event. Houston said, “Canada has always been a long standing trading partner and the cattle industry has become integrated
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
— Investigation initiated. More than 150 cattle were found already dead late last week and another 20 were euthanized in a central Alberta feedlot after they were fed too much high-concentrate grain upon entering the facility, Canadian veterinarian sources said The situation happened just days after the feedlot went into receivership and was seized by the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce. Acute carbohydrate ingestion, or simple overload, appeared to be the cause of the deaths, said Kee Jim, a veterinarian who was called in to investigate Sunday morning by the Calgary-based receiver, Deloitte and Touche. “Cattle lack the biological mechanisms to stop themselves from
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
In a country clouded by a deep suspicion of foods from cloned animals, a little Sunshine may help soften consumers' fears. Born on the coldest night of the year in mid-December, Sunshine is a female calf that's just like countless other calves born around the country. The only thing special about Sunshine is her mama, KC, the first cow ever cloned from cells collected from a dead cow. KC was named after the kidney cell from which she was cloned after it was taken from a side of beef in the freezer. “She's a beautiful calf,” said Steve Stice, the University of Georgia
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
What a coincidence, another cow from Canada tested positive for BSE last week. That was the second positive test in just nine days and the fourth overall cow of Canadian origin. This thing is starting to reach epidemic proportions, at least by our (U.S.) standards. It’s ironic that two cows have tested positive since USDA announced their final regulations to import cattle from countries of “minimum BSE risk,” including Canada. I suppose the big question is what will USDA do now about that proposed import rule on beef and cattle. At this point it appears that USDA plans on going forward, implementing
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Most knowledgeable observers note that passage of the 2002 farm bill posed significant challenges for Congress and farmers and ranchers. But, according to an influential member of the House Agriculture Committee, developing the next farm bill may be an even more difficult process. While addressing a conference at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 86th annual meeting, Rep. Jerry Moran (R-KS.) said the federal budget deficit poses the most formidable obstacle. The goal of reducing the deficit will make it hard to maintain funding for agriculture programs, and substantially less money might be authorized for the next farm bill. “Unfortunately, many members of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
The European Union has moved to lift a ban beef from four provinces in northern Argentina, the South American nation's animal and food inspection agency, Senasa, reported Wednesday. In October 2003, the EU banned beef from the provinces of Chaco, Formosa, Jujuy and Salta after foot-and-mouth disease was found among a group of hogs in Salta. On Wednesday, a European agricultural committee voted to overturn the ban, effective almost immediately. Though the EU will allow imports from these provinces, it will keep a ban on beef from an area located within 25 kilometers of the Bolivian and Paraguayan borders. Hoof-and-mouth disease
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
The first set of fed cattle recently completed all phases of the Northwest Pilot Project Animal Identification trial. Initiators of the animal ID program were pleased to report that everything appears to have gone smoothly and no glitches were found so far in their system to effectively identify and track cattle through the production chain. This first set of cattle were purchased from Bob Skinner, Skinner Ranches, Jordan Valley, OR, and placed in the Beef Northwest feedlot at Nyssa, OR. Larry Lorenzen, Lorenzen Ranches, Pendleton, OR, purchased the cattle. Because the funding had not yet come though for the pilot project,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Ruminant nutritionists around the country are urging cow/calf producers to use extra caution this winter when feeding or supplementing corn in their cattle rations. Several sources indicated that warmer-than-normal temperatures and cheap grain prices could combine to create a problem with more cattle foundering than normal. “There is no doubt that corn is a cheap feed resource right now, and it can hold a place in cow nutrition and management throughout the winter,” said Doug Linfield, nutritionist with Ruminant Specialists Inc., Hugoton, KS. “However, as good as an option as it is, it isn’t a good idea to rely on it
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
The full Senate is expected to vote on whether to confirm Nebraska Gov. Mike Johanns as the next U.S. Secretary of Agriculture on Jan. 20, the first day after reconvening from an early January recess. The Senate Agriculture Committee unanimously approved Johanns’ nomination on Jan. 6. While approval is expected from the full Senate, there could be a few points of contention by several farm state Democrats, particularly those opposed to reopening the border to Canadian live cattle and beef from older cattle. During the Jan. 6 confirmation hearing, Johanns was asked about his stances on several trade matters, including country-of-origin labeling,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Setting record straight Dear Editor (Steven Vetter), I want to clarify some errors in the article “Breed-specific beef validation debated” in your 2005 Bull Buyer’s Guide. First, I cannot be included in a group of “administrators and executive directors,” but I am in charge of producer communications for Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB). The article has me saying consumers think it false advertising when a breed-specific brand doesn’t require at least a portion of the breed claimed in their genetic makeup. Then it has me disagreeing with them. In fact, I did not agree or disagree with the idea. I did question the validity
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 14, 2005
Consumers may once again turn to low-carbohydrate diets to shed unwanted pounds this month, but the trend is unlikely to be as significant for food and beverage manufacturers as it was last year, according to the findings of a Morgan Stanley survey. Morgan Stanley’s consumer staples analysts surveyed 2,500 U.S. adults in late December. About 13 percent of those surveyed expected to start a diet in early 2005, and about one-third of those were expecting to choose a low-carb diet plan. Based on the findings of their survey, the analysts estimate six to seven million adults will start a low-carb diet in


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