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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Apr 4, 2005
Bullard doesn’t speak for me! R-CALF’s hired hand, Bill Bullard, does not speak for me. I am one of those 774,630 independent U.S. cattle producers that is fed up with Bullard implying that he speaks for all U.S. cow-calf producers. Bullard’s recent WLJ article (March 28 issue) underscores a consistent theme of reckless rhetoric that
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Apr 4, 2005
Producers who have cloned cows and bulls are anxiously awaiting the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) announcement of whether to allow the meat from those animals or their offspring to enter the food chain. FDA was expected to announce that decision prior to today’s date. However, no decision has yet been reached. Linda
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Apr 4, 2005
The state of Wyoming has already filed a notice of appeal against a federal judge’s order issued last week that dismissed the state’s lawsuit against the federal government over wolf management. Wyoming is also considering petitioning the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to remove gray wolves in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho from any protection
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Apr 4, 2005
— Private producer files ‘friend’ brief. USDA last week filed a brief with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, San Francisco, CA, saying a major meatpacker organization shouldn't be granted intervener status in ongoing litigation to determine whether the ban on Canadian cattle imports is lifted. The National Meat Association (NMA) says that opinion
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Apr 4, 2005
— Mexico working toward Canada cattle reentry. Canada last Thursday started re-allowing U.S. live cattle across the border as part of a recent agreement between Canada, Mexico and the United States on North American standards for importing and exporting cattle. The standards agreement was negotiated in Mexico during recent trade meetings, and reflects guidelines
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
Aging beef to ensure tenderness is a common practice. But, do all cuts of beef require the same amount of aging before they are considered to be tender? This is the question Colorado State University graduate student Sandra Gruber tried to answer. With funding from checkoff dollars, Gruber was able to perform a study in which she tested 17 different steaks for an aging period ranging from two to 28 days. Using the Warner-Bratzler shear force test, Gruber evaluated the tenderness of each of the cuts at the end of those aging periods. Gruber noted that previously the beef industry has acknowledged
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
Hormel acquires Lloyd's BBQ Hormel Foods has purchased Lloyd's Barbeque Co. of St. Paul, MN, from General Mills, which bought the company in 1999. Lloyd's makes a full line of refrigerated barbecue products, including tubs of barbecued beef and beef back ribs. “Lloyd's brands have earned strong market share in the retail refrigerated entrée category, a business that Hormel Foods knows well," said Joel Johnson, Hormel chairman. “We believe Lloyd's will continue to flourish as part of our roster of refrigerated products.” No terms of the agreement were announced last week. Egypt lifts ban on U.S. beef Egypt has lifted its ban on
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
Lean manufacturing beef has never seen better times. Fresh 90-percent-lean beef found a new high recently at $157.34. The last big rally in this market was in 2003, when it touched $152.13 in July—the entire beef complex was on fire. Lean manufacturing beef is a very active market and demand for hamburger has
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
— Daily processing of 2,000 head desired. The Kansas-based beef processor that has been in the news for repeatedly asking USDA to allow them to test their cattle for BSE and then export the beef to overseas markets, particularly Japan, last week announced it is going to expand its operation to almost double its current capacity. In addition, the company said it plans to maintain a policy of processing only its line of “all-natural” beef once the expansion is completed. According to Creekstone Farms Premium Beef last Wednesday, it will start construction at its Arkansas City, KS, plant within one to two
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
Endangered Species Act (ESA) reform is being sought by lawmakers in this Congress, therefore Congressman Dennis Cardoza (D-CA) reintroduced his critical habitat bill which would improve the methods used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to designate a species’ critical habitat. Critical habitat designations, which are governed under the ESA, greatly affect ranchers and other landowners in their ability to manage private lands when an endangered species inhabits this space. The House passed identical legislation known as “The Critical Habitat Enhancement Act” last summer by a vote of 28-14. This bill, if passed by both the House and Senate,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
— Cowherd shift possible. The U.S. government’s primary weather and climate agency recently indicated that drought conditions across the Southwest and southern Plains have mostly subsided thanks to an abnormally wet winter. However, that same organization wasn’t as positive about the northern half of the western U.S. If those weather conditions continue, cattle industry analysts have said a shift in national cattle herd distribution is likely starting this summer. In its 2005 Spring Outlook, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said short-term drought concerns have been alleviated in a large portion of the Southwest, particularly southern California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
— Early case confirmed in California. Veterinarians and government animal health officials are recommending earlier vaccinations for horses in an effort to prevent West Nile Virus (WNV) from becoming a severe problem this year. “Horse owners should begin vaccinating their animals in March and April this year, which is earlier than usual, as an added precaution," said Wayne Cunningham, state veterinarian at the Colorado Department of Agriculture. "Depending on the levels of infection in an area, a second booster shot might be needed later this year, which is why it's important for them to consult with their local veterinarians." WNV has caused more
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
Approximately $7 million dollars will be directed from the agriculture budget this year to help find ways for the beef industry to combat BSE and other food safety issues. Five million of those funds are specifically directed for Food Safety Research and Response, while the remaining $2 million is being redirected for enhanced research into BSE. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns announced the funding allocations during his keynote remarks at the National Restaurant Association’s Food Safety Summit held March 16-18 in Washington, DC. “In a rapidly changing world marketplace, science is the universal language that must guide our rules and policies, rather
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
Lean manufacturing beef has never seen better times. Fresh 90-percent-lean beef found a new high recently at $157.34. The last big rally in this market was in 2003, when it touched $152.13 in July—the entire beef complex was on fire. Lean manufacturing beef is a very active market and demand for hamburger has never been better. The cow beef cutout value is also at the top of its trading range at $120. Food service uses a great deal of this type of product. This is essentially the same index that is used on the Choice/Select cutout value, which has been trading
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
Among the U.S.’ most geographically dispersed small businesses are the 774,630 independent businesses that raise beef cattle. These independent businesses comprise the U.S. cattle industry, which is by far the largest beef producer in the world. These independent businesses contribute nearly $40 billion annually to the U.S. economy. As such, they are critically important to the financial well being of the U.S. economy, and rural America in particular. These independent cattle-raising businesses are the foundation for the nation’s $175 billion beef industry. They operate in a global market, facing fierce competition from other beef-producing countries of the world. Foreign competitors are
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
Labeling overrrated Dear Mr. Vetter: As a beef producer I have always felt fortunate that there are ten or more packing plants operating in the upper Midwest. They are a huge asset to the dairy and beef producers in the region. It is because of these mostly independent plants that the North Central States have one of the best cow markets in the country. Logic dictates that the cattle procurement range of the packing plants of the northern United States and southern Canada extend across the border. The shrinking of cattle production in the upper Midwest has increased the need for this
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
The 2004-2005 Midland Bull Test has come to an end with the final weights taken March 4-5. The 1,100 bulls on test this year sell on April 6, 7, and 8 and have been ultrasound and fertility tested. Information is available on the website www.midlandbulltest.com. For additional questions contact Leo or Sam McDonnell at 406/322.5597 or email them at bulltest@wtp.net. Angus There were 50 Angus bulls on test at Midland Bull Test. The top 70-75 percent sell April 8 at the Midland Bull Test sale facilities. Angus bulls were split into two groups, the first group was the Green Tag division,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
— Placements good for fall feds. — February marketings disappointing. USDA’s March 1 Cattle-on-Feed Report resulted in a mixed bag of fed market forecasts coming from cattle market analysts. Lower-than-expected placements last month were called very bullish for deferred futures contracts and late summer, fall cash fed cattle prices. Below-a-year-ago marketings led to some bearish thoughts for cash cattle through April and early May, despite them being within pre-report estimates. According to the agency’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), February placements totaled 1.52 million head, six percent below February of last year and eight percent fewer than February 2003. In addition, that figure
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 28, 2005
The Bureau of Land Management announced last week that it is selling more than 500 wild horses to two Indian Tribes in the Dakotas under a new law passed by Congress. The BLM has sold 141 wild horses (105 mares and 36 studs) to the Rosebud Sioux of South Dakota and 120 horses (96 mares and 24 studs) to the Three Affiliated Tribes of North Dakota. Completion of other sales to these tribes will take place over the next several weeks. BLM Director Kathleen Clarke said, “As the BLM implements the new sale-authority legislation passed by Congress, we are pleased to announce