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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 31, 2005
The National Western Stock Show is again history and plans are already being made for next year’s 100th anniversary show. Now is the time to plan for next year’s National Western as it will be a very special event and one that you will not want to miss. The National Western is truly the “Grand Daddy” of all stock shows. It is a show that is loaded with cattle, horses, and people as well as many other types of livestock. I attended my first stock show in 1971 while I was a senior at Montana State University and I haven’t missed
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
A capacity crowd of livestock producers and livestock industry affiliates filled the National Western Club on Thursday, Jan. 13, to celebrate the U.S. red meat industry and honor a long-time participant of the National Western Stock Show. Francis Rogers, Wagon Wheel Angus Ranch, Yuma, CO, was honored for approximately 56 years of exhibiting at the “Super Bowl of Cattle Shows” when he was named the 2005 recipient of the Friend of the National Western Award. Standing by his side during the awards ceremony was his wife of over 50 years, Mary. Sons Kenny and Stan were also on hand for the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
Argentina's 2005 beef exports will hit at least $1.3 billion, Agriculture Secretary Miguel Campos said last Wednesday. This would put beef exports up about $300 million from 2004, Campos said, noting that Argentina is currently shipping beef to 85 countries. Beef sales have been on the rise since 2003, when they totaled 379,366 tons,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
National beef packers report first quarter results National Beef Packers reported a net loss of $4.4 million in the first quarter ended Nov. 27, as sales dipped very slightly, from $1.058 billion to $1.051 billion. In the first quarter a year ago, the company showed a net profit of $19 million. Chief Executive John Miller blamed the declining results mainly on the closure of the Canadian and Japanese borders. The Canadian border closing has deprived the market of about 1.5 million cattle, leading to short supply and higher prices for live cattle, even as Canada ships the equivalent of over
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
Most producers know the cattle cycle moves inventory and prices up and down because of supply and demand. You know something about supply, but what about demand? Economists see it as a set of dots on a curve of how much beef consumers will buy over a range of prices. More beef sold does not necessarily signal an increase in demand; that requires more beef at equal or higher prices, or less beef at sharply higher prices. Demand changes with the economy, competing protein prices and outside factors like world trade. Beef product demand sets cattle price because the value of a
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
— At least six head being traced. As of press time last Thursday, USDA officials were still in the process of tracking down at least six cows that were shipped into the U.S. from the same Canadian herd that had the country’s next-to-last confirmed case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The six cows in question were all born within one year of the Alberta-origin, eight-year-old dairy cow that was confirmed positive for the disease on Jan. 2. A seventh cohort cow was brought into the U.S. back in 2002, but was slaughtered upon entering the borders. The concern with the six one-time herd
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
Random tests conducted by the Canadian government recently discovered that four brands of Canadian cattle feed were in violation of the nation’s ban on animal protein in cattle feed. With the increasing number of cases of BSE being discovered in Canada, the Canadian Food (CFIA) Inspection Agency and two U.S. trade teams are taking a more thorough look into the compliance with the 1997 ban on ruminant-to-ruminant feeding. In total, 110 samples were collected between January and March of 2004. Microscopic examinations of these samples distinguished animal material in 66 of the 110 samples. Sergio Tolusso, CFIA’s feed program coordinator, said
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
An attempt to increase business in Chicago Mercantile Exchange electronic livestock futures may be having the opposite effect. To begin the year, the CME instituted a lead market maker program for electronic livestock futures to increase on-screen liquidity and volume. So far, electronic live cattle futures have put up the best volume numbers, with 418 contracts traded last Thursday. But, many traditional CME cattle pit traders who fill orders by open outcry are not happy with one feature of the new program. As an incentive to attract CME e-livestock lead market makers, an approved LMM
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
At the risk of being told that I’m out of the loop or am avoiding the subject, let me take the liberty of not talking about the ongoing—and less than uplifting—soap opera of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in this column. Instead, let’s talk about some of the recent positive decisions regarding the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and their influence on the future for western ranchers and private landowners. During the last quarter of last year and the beginning of 2005 the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced that a couple of subspecies of prairie dogs and the greater sage grouse were
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
Producers are well aware of the environmental changes that have evolved over the past decade or two. But, are producers prepared for future changes to the environment? Agriculture Research Service (ARS) scientists want producers to be aware that the ongoing drought may not be the only difficultly they need to account for in their production operation. These scientists are saying that elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may reduce forage quality, leading to reduced weight gain or more costly gain for livestock. Plant physiologist Jack Morgan at Colorado State University lead the study with ARS colleagues and cooperators. Morgan explained
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
An article in the Journal of the American Medical Association last week reported that a new American Cancer Society (ACS) study has shown long-term “high” consumption of red and processed meat may increase the risk of a certain type of colon or rectal cancer. These statements are causing quite a disturbance in the livestock industry. Some health officials have come forth to combat the information and are reinforcing the nutritional value of fresh beef products. The study performed by the Atlanta, GA, ACS collected information on the meat-eating behavior of nearly 150,000 people across the U.S. in 1982 and in 1992.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
— Agency denies 14-month age proposal. Japan and the U.S. are expected to hold high-level talks in February aimed at striking a final agreement lifting Japan's 13-month-old ban on U.S. beef imports over bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), USDA trade sources told WLJ last Thursday. The exact days of those final discussions was still not known as of press time Thursday. The meeting was expected, however, to happen during the second or third week of the month. Following that meeting, if the two countries proceed with regulatory protocols without any delay, the U.S. could resume exporting beef to Japan in the summer, sources
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
The chief of the country’s third largest beef processor told cow/calf and seedstock cattle producers recently it is very unlikely Japan will reopen its borders to U.S. beef during the first half of 2005, and that most of the Pacific Rim could keep U.S. beef out for the rest of the year. “Japan is gaming against us very well....and the protein dynamics over there are changing to where U.S. beef isn’t needed like it was before (pre-BSE),” said John Simons, CEO and president of Swift & Company, in comments during the Jan. 13 Red Meat Club banquet and meeting held in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
A federal court ruled in favor of the Klamath Water Uses Association Jan. 14, dismissing a case brought by the Yurok Tribe to usurp the water rights of Klamath farmers. The case challenged the Bureau of Reclamation’s management of water in the Klamath River. The tribe claimed the government’s management of the Klamath Project violated fishing rights in the 2002 filing and resulted in a die-off of salmon on the lower Klamath River. Oakland, CA, Federal Judge Saundra Armstrong agreed with motions put forth by the Klamath Water Users Association (KWUA) and the federal government that there was no evidence linking
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
Shoot, shovel and shut-up Letter to the Editor, On Jan. 11, Canada announced another case of BSE in a beef cow that was born after the 1997 feed ban. I was not surprised by this finding, as our USDA has said that there could be up to 11 animals found before Canada would surpass the “minimum risk” category. However, I was greatly surprised when my uncle from Alberta gave me a call this morning. He stated that the Premier has instigated the “Shoot, shovel and shut-up” policy. Basically he has told the farmers and ranchers that if they have any animal that may
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
The much-anticipated USDA Animal Plant Health Inspection Service's (APHIS) final rule for allowing Canadian live cattle, sheep and related meat product imports into the U.S. was released on Dec. 29 and published in the Jan. 4 Federal Register. The rule creates requirements for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) minimal risk regions, and specifically designates Canada as the first country classified as such a region. Other countries that want to qualify may submit requests to the USDA for the designation. Regions classified as minimal risk have had documented cases of BSE, but have regulatory measures in place that make the introduction of BSE into
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
Alberta Premier Ralph Klein suggested earlier this month that Canada seriously look into a mass cull of older and other BSE-suspect cows in an effort to restore international confidence in Canadian beef. No formal request has been made, however, Klein’s suggestion has been taken into account by several groups, which are widely divided on the question. Klein last week specified that he was suggesting a “cull” and not mass slaughter. “I haven't suggested a mass slaughter. I haven't used that word,” Klein said. “I am saying that there is a need for a cull, but how that cull is achieved is entirely
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
— R-CALF invitation snubbed. The nation’s two largest cattle producer organizations will not align themselves with each other to legally challenge final regulatory rules governing Canadian cattle and beef entering the U.S., despite apparently narrowing their differences on the matter. On Tuesday, Jan. 18, Leo McDonnell, president of R-CALF USA, sent a letter to Jan Lyons, president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), inviting NCBA and its affiliates to publicly support R-CALF’s pending lawsuit against that import rule. “During the past few days I have reviewed reports and statements issued by you and your organization suggesting that NCBA may be reconsidering its
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
— Holds promise as livestock feed. Dirt, sun and rain or irrigation are all the basic requirements a producer needs to grow a new variety of oats that is said to have dramatically higher yields, be high in crude protein and have more digestibility than other oat varieties. This year will be the first year the new “delayed heading” variety, called EverLeaf 126, will be marketed in the U.S. But, preliminary testing has shown better quality, tonnage and higher forage yields than typical oat varieties. Delayed heading enables a wider harvesting window, according to researchers. “So if it is raining, or a producer
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 24, 2005
Charlie Bell Former president and CEO of McDonald’s Corp. Charlie Bell died Monday, Jan. 17, after battling colo-rectal cancer. Bell died in his hometown of Sydney, Australia, at the age of 44. Bell was elected McDonald's president and CEO by the board of directors in April 2004, following the death of Jim Cantalupo. Bell previously served as president and COO, and was responsible for the company's more than 30,000 restaurants in 119 countries, during which time he also became a director of the company. Before his promotion to president and COO in December 2002, Bell served as president of McDonald’s Europe, and


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