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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Purebred Angus cattle dominated the 2004 National Angus Carcass Challenge (NACC), but they came from such diverse areas as Texas to Montana, Idaho to Iowa. Winners were from a wide range of genetic and management programs, fed in eight feedlots in five states and harvested at eight plants in six states. Stan and Brad Fansher, Garden City, KS., had their Grand Champion pen fed by neighbor and feeding partner of 15 years, Sam Hands, Triangle H Grain & Cattle Co. No one was surprised that these heifers did well—their sisters won reserve division champion in the 2003 NACC, and Fansher Angus
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) has named Jay Truitt as the next vice president of government affairs in its Washington, D.C., office. After an intensive selection process, NCBA Chief Executive Officer Terry Stokes officially announced the promotion last week. Truitt, NCBA’s executive director of legislative affairs since March 2001, officially took the helm of NCBA’s Washington office immediately. “Truitt brings exceptional leadership, lobbying, and management experience to his new role at NCBA,” says Stokes. “His ranching heritage from his family’s cow/calf operation in Missouri, his experience at the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and his previous role at NCBA provides a depth
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
After considering input from producers at four meetings across the state, the Nebraska Cattlemen Board of Directors developed a plan to address six primary concerns its members have related to the USDA plan to resume live cattle imports from Canada beginning March 7. Those concerns include: • Canadian feed rule compliance: NC membership has concerns regarding Canada’s compliance rate with the ban on feeding ruminant byproducts to ruminant animals. So, NC will actively investigate Canada’s compliance by: 1. Thoroughly reviewing reports from USDA’s trade investigation team currently in Canada and from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association trade investigation team; 2. Seeking additional
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
NATIONAL WESTERN MILE HIGH RED ANGUS CLASSIC Jan. 17, Denver, CO 16 Open heifers $4,347 3 Choice/Pick lots 5,466 2 Bulls 3,250 12 Embryo packages 2,264 5 Bred females 2,580 6 Flushes 2,925 6 Semen packages 1,525 Auctioneer: Kyle Gilchrist Sale Management: Amy and Kyle Gilchrist On fairly short notice—an incredible line-up of live cattle, embryo= s and flushes was assembled from progressive breeders of Red Angus cattle from across the country. Some of the freshest genetics in the breed were offered! A large crowd of mostly regular breeders from across the U.S. were on hand and were very active for a solid sale. TOPS—Glacier OSCE 403, 2 0/04, daughter of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Joe Mendiburu Joe Mendiburu, 87, passed away at his home Jan. 20, five years and one day after his beloved wife, Jeannie, passed. Mendiburu was born in Bakersfield, California Aug. 18, 1917, to parents, Gregorio and Eulalia Mendiburu. He married Jeannie in May 1941, and followed in his father’s footsteps in the livestock business. He never missed a day of work, not even for vacation. His day always involved the purchase of sheep or cattle and he loved working alongside his faithful and longtime employees, and they would vouch that no one could work the cattle chute like he could. He was very proud
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Drought, declining water tables, and legal issues are limiting the amount of irrigation water available. University of Nebraska-Lincoln forage specialist, Bruce Anderson producers who don't have enough water to grow a good grain crop, may be able to rely on forages. Anderson realizes that many irrigated acres won't receive enough water this summer to grow a grain or root crop. He says sometimes producers can combine water allocated for several fields onto one field to get a crop, but that still leaves the other acres with little or no water at all. Forage crops also need water for high production, but, unlike
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Recent European research has indicated that one livestock-specific transmissible encephalopathy (TSE) has been found to harbor in the livers of transgenic mice. However, U.S. cattle industry scientists have said that research is misleading many U.S. producers to the wrong conclusion about BSE and its infectivity in cattle. The research conducted by a Zurich, Switzerland, scientist indicated that scrapie, a disease said to be isolated to sheep and other related small ruminants, was found in the mice of livers when introduced into the mice. Upon the release of that information earlier this month, the scientists behind the research said that there shouldn’t be
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Calling a move to increase the maximum dose of radiation that can be used to treat food risky for human health, the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen said Monday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration should revoke its ruling allowing the change. Public Citizen made its comments to the FDA on the last day such comments could be made, according to a release from the organization. The group requested a public haring about the health effects of consuming such food. The rule would boost the energy level of X-rays that could be used to irradiate fruit, vegetables, beef, poultry, pork, eggs
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
— Also demands Canada tests 50,000 annually. A hearing date of March 2 has been set by a United States district court judge concerning a request for preliminary injunction filed against USDA’s Final Rule regarding Canadian cattle and beef exports to the U.S. If granted, the injunction filed by R-CALF USA would prevent the border from opening to live Canadian cattle 30 months of age and younger and all Canadian beef, regardless of the age of the source. Additionally, R-CALF has requested that Canada must test a minimum of 50,000 cattle a year to gain a true assessment of its BSE prevalence. Ranchers-Cattlemen
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
— Other diseases respond to later vaccinations. As calving season has either started or is on the verge of starting, producers are urged to take a serious look at how they manage calves through the first several weeks of their lives and prevent the spread of both viral and bacterial forms of scours, veterinarians told producers last Tuesday during the Cattlemen’s College portion of the Cattle Industry Annual Convention, Feb. 1-5, San Antonio, TX. According to Dr. Rob Callan, professor of veterinary medicine and cattle health specialist at Colorado State University, producers can eliminate the prevalence of calf scours by separating calves
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns got an unofficial welcome to Washington last Thursday when he testified to an at-times hostile Senate Agricultural Committee hearing. In sharp contrast to the warm reception at his confirmation hearings, Johanns faced probing questions about USDA's plans to reopen the Canadian border to live cattle. Johanns was also grilled about the lack of progress in opening the Japanese and other foreign markets to U.S. beef, as well as a lack of transparency in allowing some potentially dangerous products, such as tongue, into the country from Canada. The big issue, though, was the USDA final rule's contradictory exclusion of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
As tax preparation gets under way, agricultural producers need to be aware of a number of changes in tax regulations. "Staying up to date on these changes will help producers prepare their returns accurately," says Ron Haugen, North Dakota State University Extension Service farm economist. "Producers have until March 1 to file their returns without penalty. If they made an estimated tax payment by Jan. 18, they have until April 15 to file." Items to note for 2004 income tax preparation: • The personal exemption amount has increased to $3,100. • The standard deduction has increased to $9,700 for those who are married, filing
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Taiwan is expected to announce by the end of February the results of its federal inspections of U.S. packing facilities that were supposed to mark the final stage in allowing U.S. beef back into the island nation, according to officials with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Taiwan suspended beef from the U.S. in December 2003 due to safety concerns over bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) after the discovery of a singe case of the disease at a Washington state farm. Several USDA officials said Taiwan health and agriculture officials have traveled to the U.S. and have conducted on-site inspections of the implementation
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
A federal judge ruled Tuesday that President George W. Bush’s administration violated the Endangered Species Act when it relaxed protections on many of the gray wolves in the U.S. The decision by U.S. District Judge Robert E. Jones in Portland, OR, rescinds a rule change that allowed ranchers to shoot wolves on sight if they were attacking livestock, said Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group. In April 2003, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service divided the wolves’ range into three areas and reclassified the Eastern and Western populations as threatened instead of endangered. The Eastern segment covers
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 31, 2005
John Carter, a fifth generation producer and former chairman of the Australian Beef Association, spoke to the crowd about Australia’s animal identification program at the sixth annual R-CALF USA convention held in Denver, CO, January 19-23. Carter cautioned the producer group to learn from mistakes of Australia and the United Kingdom (UK) and realize that the program is not working. “I came from Australia with one message-don’t be railroaded into a bureaucratic ID nightmare like the United Kingdom,” said Carter. “It’s killing the UK beef industry.” Carter quoted a UK parliamentary report released last November to support his statement. The report indicated
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 31, 2005
McD’s late ‘04 sales jump McDonald's Corp., last week reported that global system-wide sales for its restaurants increased 9.6 percent in December and 9.5 percent for the 2004 fourth quarter compared with the same periods in 2003. According to McDonald's CEO Jim Skinner, the company served more than 48 million customers per day during 2004, an increase of 1.6 million customers per day over the prior year. December and fourth quarter results were fueled by the performance of the U.S. burger business, which was up almost seven percent from the same time period of 2003. Uruguay sends most exports to U.S. The U.S.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 31, 2005
Attorneys representing the widow of a Nebraska rancher recently filed a lawsuit against a livestock pharmaceutical company, saying there was not an appropriate delivery system supplied alongside a popular treatment for bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Allegations also include that the company failed to have appropriate warnings about how dangerous the drug was to human health and that there was no antidote available in case of accidental injection to humans. Debra Erickson, Clay County, NE, in a Jan. 20 filing with U.S. District Court, North Platte, NE, alleges that Eli Lily & Company was negligent in failing to provide adequate information about
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 31, 2005
During the week of his second inauguration, President George W. Bush celebrated by eating beef produced from a Wyoming ranch and produced by a Colorado Springs company. Ranch Foods Direct, which operates a fabrication plant in Colorado Springs, shipped 1,200 pounds of prime rib roast to Washington D.C. to be served at the White House on Wednesday, Jan. 19. The beef was originally produced from a Wyoming ranch under “natural” production protocol. “It was wonderful, really tasty," said Max Hansen, chef and owner of Max and Me Catering, who prepared and served the presidential dinner. “It was a hot item, too, not
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 31, 2005
During the week of his second inauguration, President George W. Bush celebrated by eating beef produced from a Wyoming ranch and produced by a Colorado Springs company. Ranch Foods Direct, which operates a fabrication plant in Colorado Springs, shipped 1,200 pounds of prime rib roast to Washington D.C. to be served at the White House on Wednesday, Jan. 19. The beef was originally produced from a Wyoming ranch under “natural” production protocol. “It was wonderful, really tasty," said Max Hansen, chef and owner of Max and Me Catering, who prepared and served the presidential dinner. “It was a hot item, too, not
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jan 31, 2005
— Investigation of Jan. 2 BSE case concluded. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said last week the results of an audit of the country's ban on feeding ruminant materials back to ruminants, implemented back in 1997, will be available around Feb. 21, or shortly thereafter. CFIA officials gave details on the audit, saying they have concluded their investigation into an Alberta dairy cow found infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) Jan. 2. Dr. Brian Evans, CFIA’s chief veterinarian, said the infection of the Jan. 2 animal in all probability came from feeding the animal feed contaminated with ruminant meat or bone meal.


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