Home / Articles / by WLJ
 

WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Producers have to come to expect a missing calf or two here and there and chalk it up to theft or predators. But when double digit figures of animals that are yearlings and older disappear from a pasture, it’s more than what some Kansas producers can financially endure. It’s possible that the high cattle market is contributing to the rash of cattle thefts in the Midwest. However, those higher prices also mean that more of a loss is incurred by the producer. Most producers do have their cattle insured. But, insurance only pays for the animal, and not the loss of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced proposed regulations to remove restrictions on beef imports. Restrictions were introduced following the detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Washington state on Dec. 23, 2003. Based on the guidelines of the World Organization for Animal Health, the CFIA plans to permit the importation of live cattle born in 1996 or later, beef from animals of any age from which specified risk material has been removed and various other commodities, , according to a news release from the agency. Products that may pose a higher risk, such as certain animal feeds, will remain prohibited. The proposed regulations
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
China expects to export double the corn crop it did last year, while Argentina appears on pace to raise its exportable corn harvest slightly. Corn exports from China will experience a partial revival this year with the government considering more policies to boost overseas sales, state media reports, citing an expert at the National Grain and Oils Information Center. Exports of corn from China are forecast to more than double to 5 million metric tons in the marketing year ending September 2005, the China Daily reports, citing forecasts by an unnamed expert at the center. The center predicts that China's corn output will
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
There is only four weeks left until USDA’s Canadian import plan is to start on March 7. Up till now there hasn’t been much more than a little noise and a few letters from congress persons opposing USDA’s cattle import plans. If congress is going to get in the act, I would expect to see a lot more action very soon. Senators Tim Johnson (D-SD) and Mike Enzi (R-WY) introduced some legislation late last week to keep the Canadian border closed until October 2006 when Country of Origin Labeling kicks in. It will be interesting to see if it makes
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
On Jan. 27, a group of ten industry associations, including National Meat Association, sponsored a conference to analyze the science and risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in North America. Presentations covered epidemiology, animal health, communications, and speakers included experts from the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), as well as several of the sponsoring organizations. Measures under consideration include a ban on Specified Risk Materials (SRMs) in all animal feed or a similar ban on deadstock alone. According to the computer modeling done by Harvard
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has made available instructions to report suspected animals with Foreign Animal Diseases (FADs) such as BSE, Avian Influenza and hoof-and-mouth disease and other conditions to Public Health Veterinarians (PHVs). These instructions (FSIS Directive 6000.1) outline the responsibilities of PHVs associated with identifying and reporting suspected incidences of FADs. Also included is a of possible symptoms—Signs of FADs list—that provides further information at both ante-mortem and postmortem inspections. Upon inspection, Public Health Veterinarians are to consider animals exhibiting these signs as "U.S. Suspects" and are to contact the district office of the FSIS as
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
A panel of European Union scientists Jan. 28 confirmed that a goat slaughtered in France in 2002 was infected with a form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). This is the first time that BSE has been found in a goat.The animal and its entire herd were destroyed before entering the foodchain, according to a statement by the EU Commission. "I am proposing to extend testing further to determine whether this is an isolated incident," said EU Health and Consumer Protection Commissioner Markos Kyprianou. The EU Commission wants to test 200,000 goats in the region’s 25 member states over the next six months. The
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
— Other indicators bearish. — Light volumes, moisture boost calf prices. Fed cattle trade activity was following the pattern set the previous three weeks with northern trade happening Thursday and southern cattle not being marketed until Friday. Through midday Thursday Nebraska cattle feeders had sold 15-20,000 head at mostly $140-141 dressed. No trade activity was reported in either Kansas or Texas, as packer bids were still hovering around $86, while asking prices from prospective sellers ranged $90-91. While early trade in northern feeding areas was $1-2 higher than two weeks ago, packer bids were starting to be pulled back with most getting back
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
A top official of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries said Jan. 27 he believes the amount of U.S. beef imports to Japan will be limited even if a ban on such imports over BSE is lifted later this year, reports Kyodo. "Unfortunately, we would not be able to respond to demand from restaurants serving beef dishes and ox tongues," said Mamoru Ishihara, vice farm minister, at a press conference. Japan and the United States are expected to hold high-level talks in February aimed at striking an accord to lift Japan's ban on U.S. beef imports. If the two countries carry
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns met with Japanese Ambassador Ryozo Kato in Washington, DC, last week to stress the importance of the Japanese reopening their border to U.S. beef. Johanns says he realizes the importance of the beef issue and was looking to gauge Japan’s willingness to open the border. After the meeting, Johanns made a few comments to the news media about the discussion. First Johanns said he thanked the ambassador for their past working relationship when Johanns was the governor of a Midwestern state that thrived from major Japanese investments. On that note, Johanns proceeded to emphasize to the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
On any given day on the remote roads of Kansas, hundreds of tractor-trailers are hauling cattle across the state’s vast rangelands, headed for feedlots and slaughterhouses. And in an era of BSE and the threat of agroterrorism, federal agriculture regulators want to be able to locate within 48 hours—or sooner—the whereabouts of each of the nation’s 100 million-plus head of cattle. Enter a Kansas proposal that would combine GPS, cellular and radio frequency technologies to track cattle as they are in transit. It is one of the ideas the U.S. Department of Agriculture is testing and one that could shape the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
The long-held perception that consumption of high protein foods such as meat causes excess calcium loss is not true, according to research funded by the Beef Checkoff Program. The two-year study was conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center in Grand Forks, N.D. The research announced Jan. 28 confirms findings from other studies showing that protein from meat does not compromise calcium status. Meat protein can increase calcium absorption and has beneficial effects on bone health, said Dr. Sharon Miller, director of nutrition research for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, one of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Rogue proteins like those that cause bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)—found previously only in brain, nerve and lymph tissues —have now been located in the liver, kidney and pancreas in a study of rodents. While the discovery raises the possibility that similar proteins could move into unanticipated parts of farm animals that have similar diseases, it isn't a reason for alarm, says researcher Adriano Aguzzi of the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland. But, he adds, "There is reason to reappraise critically the way regulations that are already in place" are enforced. Sick animals such as sheep and cows shouldn't enter the human food chain,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Purebred Angus cattle dominated the 2004 National Angus Carcass Challenge (NACC), but they came from such diverse areas as Texas to Montana, Idaho to Iowa. Winners were from a wide range of genetic and management programs, fed in eight feedlots in five states and harvested at eight plants in six states. Stan and Brad Fansher, Garden City, KS., had their Grand Champion pen fed by neighbor and feeding partner of 15 years, Sam Hands, Triangle H Grain & Cattle Co. No one was surprised that these heifers did well—their sisters won reserve division champion in the 2003 NACC, and Fansher Angus
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) has named Jay Truitt as the next vice president of government affairs in its Washington, D.C., office. After an intensive selection process, NCBA Chief Executive Officer Terry Stokes officially announced the promotion last week. Truitt, NCBA’s executive director of legislative affairs since March 2001, officially took the helm of NCBA’s Washington office immediately. “Truitt brings exceptional leadership, lobbying, and management experience to his new role at NCBA,” says Stokes. “His ranching heritage from his family’s cow/calf operation in Missouri, his experience at the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and his previous role at NCBA provides a depth
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
After considering input from producers at four meetings across the state, the Nebraska Cattlemen Board of Directors developed a plan to address six primary concerns its members have related to the USDA plan to resume live cattle imports from Canada beginning March 7. Those concerns include: • Canadian feed rule compliance: NC membership has concerns regarding Canada’s compliance rate with the ban on feeding ruminant byproducts to ruminant animals. So, NC will actively investigate Canada’s compliance by: 1. Thoroughly reviewing reports from USDA’s trade investigation team currently in Canada and from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association trade investigation team; 2. Seeking additional
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
NATIONAL WESTERN MILE HIGH RED ANGUS CLASSIC Jan. 17, Denver, CO 16 Open heifers $4,347 3 Choice/Pick lots 5,466 2 Bulls 3,250 12 Embryo packages 2,264 5 Bred females 2,580 6 Flushes 2,925 6 Semen packages 1,525 Auctioneer: Kyle Gilchrist Sale Management: Amy and Kyle Gilchrist On fairly short notice—an incredible line-up of live cattle, embryo= s and flushes was assembled from progressive breeders of Red Angus cattle from across the country. Some of the freshest genetics in the breed were offered! A large crowd of mostly regular breeders from across the U.S. were on hand and were very active for a solid sale. TOPS—Glacier OSCE 403, 2 0/04, daughter of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Joe Mendiburu Joe Mendiburu, 87, passed away at his home Jan. 20, five years and one day after his beloved wife, Jeannie, passed. Mendiburu was born in Bakersfield, California Aug. 18, 1917, to parents, Gregorio and Eulalia Mendiburu. He married Jeannie in May 1941, and followed in his father’s footsteps in the livestock business. He never missed a day of work, not even for vacation. His day always involved the purchase of sheep or cattle and he loved working alongside his faithful and longtime employees, and they would vouch that no one could work the cattle chute like he could. He was very proud
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 7, 2005
Drought, declining water tables, and legal issues are limiting the amount of irrigation water available. University of Nebraska-Lincoln forage specialist, Bruce Anderson producers who don't have enough water to grow a good grain crop, may be able to rely on forages. Anderson realizes that many irrigated acres won't receive enough water this summer to grow a grain or root crop. He says sometimes producers can combine water allocated for several fields onto one field to get a crop, but that still leaves the other acres with little or no water at all. Forage crops also need water for high production, but, unlike
Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar