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Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
An expected ramping up of slaughter volume this year is expected to result in cattle feeders’ struggling to show profits throughout 2005, according to a cattle market analytics firm. In addition, that profit deterioration will probably trickle down to producers supplying them with placement cattle, particularly stocker operators. During the annual Cattle Industry Convention Feb. 1-5 in San Antonio, TX, analysts for Cattle-Fax, Lone Tree, CO, told producers that recent herd rebuilding would result in almost 850,000 more fed steers and heifers being available for processing and that a lot of beef from those cattle would need to be discounted in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
A recent survey of ranchers revealed that 75 percent of cattle producers are using the latest in DNA technology to improve the cattle characteristics most associated with bettering the quality of beef. According to DNA testing company Bovigen, 75 percent of cattle producers are using the latest DNA testing technology to improve the quality of their beef cattle, and more than two-thirds of surveyed ranchers said they are realizing economic benefits from the technology. Forty-four percent of those who use the technology said they've seen increased efficiencies in management, offering such anecdotal comments as "it makes life simpler." Others gave long- term
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
South Dakota is moving forward with a beef certification program that should boost profits for participating producers as well as meet requirements for a proposed animal identification program. South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds is pushing for a South Dakota beef certification program because he says he is committed to raising the standards for beef production in the state and making sure that consumers all around the world know exactly what the state is doing. “It’s a vision of South Dakota being known by consumers worldwide as the home of the ‘World’s Best Beef,’” said Rounds. Gov. Rounds introduced the program as part of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
— Support stated for group’s action. Attorney generals from Montana, North and South Dakota, Nevada, New Mexico, Connecticut and West Virginia filed legal arguments in federal court last Wednesday supporting the Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund’s United Stockgrowers of America (R-CALF) legal challenge against USDA’s final rule regarding expanding imports of Canadian beef and cattle in the wake of BSE in that country. The attorneys general said they support the group's request for a temporary restraining order because USDA was very “hasty” in setting a March 7 implementation date for allowing more Canadian beef and live cattle into the U.S. “Our position is that
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
A South Dakota House committee last week rejected a plan to set up a state beef checkoff system as a backup in case the U.S. Supreme Court rules the national program unconstitutional. The state’s agriculture committee voted 8-5 to kill the bill after officials of South Dakota agricultural organizations acknowledged they are split on the proposal. HB1182 would have created a state checkoff system for beef if the national system is declared unconstitutional. Supporters argued that the state should impose its own fee of $1 a head when cattle are sold so money would continue to be available to pay for promotion and
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
A new EPD—Stayability—has been published in the American Simmental Association (ASA) Spring ’05 Sire Summary and will soon be available online. Calculated by Colorado State University’s Center for the Genetic Evaluation of Livestock, Stayability is defined as the probability that daughters entering the herd will stay in production through 6 years of age. “Stayability is a compound trait in that several factors may influence it,” said Dr. Wade Shafer, Director of Performance Programs at ASA. “From a Simmental Seedstock Producer’s prospective, traits such as fertility, soundness, productivity and temperament are candidates for influencing Stayability. To the degree that these traits influence commercial
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
A new study by an international task force, "Global Risks of Infectious Animal Diseases," discusses the severe economic, social and political impacts of disease outbreaks and outlines national and international monitoring, surveillance and response practices. The comprehensive study, issued by the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, was written and evaluated by the task force of 13 authors and four reviewers from France, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. The paper brings together the expertise and experience of scientists and researchers on the front lines of this growing worldwide concern. It includes a historical review of the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
Scientists and researchers are not letting up on their quest to make every steak delicious and tender. Agriculture Research Service (ARS) scientists in Clay Center Nebraska have expanded on research started in 1980 and are continuing to discover what impacts tenderness, how they can improve upon the process, and how producers can breed tenderness into their herd. Some of these discoveries are already being used by the livestock industry. Animal physiologist Mohammad Koohmaraie is leading the tenderness project at the Nebraska Meat Animal Research Center (MARC). He feels, “Tenderness is the most important trait to consumers and the most variable.” The projects
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
Tyson will restart suspended operations at beef plants in the Upper Midwest and pacific Northwest, company officials announced Feb. 10. The affected plants will resume production on a staggered basis over the next two weeks. Market conditions prompted Tyson to suspend operations Jan. 10 in Denison, IA; Norfolk and West Point, NE; and Boise, ID. Second shift processing at Pasco, WA, was also temporarily discontinued. The company now plans to resume production based on the following schedule: Denison Wednesday, Feb. 16 Norfolk A-shift processing Monday, Feb. 21 West Point Tuesday, Feb. 22 Boise Tuesday, Feb. 22 Norfolk B-shift processing Wednesday, Feb. 23 Pasco B-shift processing Thursday, Feb. 24 Designated
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 21, 2005
Grocers across the U.S. offered a broad selection of fresh meat and poultry products last week with a wide range of prices for featured items, giving shoppers multiple choices to meet their food budgets and needs. Spending for food tends to be slower during the last half of the month. In an effort to attract additional shoppers to their stores, some grocers included more lower-priced items such as chicken leg quarters and ground beef in their weekly promotions. However, some also promoted one or more of the high-end beef cuts such as T-bones, strips, and rib-eyes. Market sources said the presence of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
By law, Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns released President George W. Bush’s budget plans for helping farmers and ranchers the first Monday in February. According to the proposed budget, there will be a $587 million cut in farm subsidy spending in 2006. However, continued spending is planned for BSE testing and implementation of a National Animal Identification System. Johanns began the announcement by commending the President for proposing a budget for USDA that meets agriculture’s most important priorities while exercising the kind of fiscal discipline that is absolutely necessary right now. "Many proposals in this budget produce savings wherever possible,” said Johanns.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Anyone associated with agriculture can appreciate the buildup of clouds on the horizon. The slow progressive change in both sight and feel certainly causes a feeling of uncertainty, if not outright worry. It is at times like this that the saying "feels like rain" may have originated. Anyone familiar with weather realizes there are two sides to every coin. Rain for one operation may very well mean hail for the next. A gentle watering in one county could be a gusher in the next. Today, those in the cattle industry are viewing the much-discussed potential changes in animal identification with the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Wendy's results turn favorable After a difficult autumn and early winter, Wendy's International saw its same-store sales edge up 0.5 percent in January at corporate locations, and 1.4 percent to 1.6 percent at franchised locations. Chairman Jack Schuessler said the turnaround, after months of declining same-store comparisons, was due to the performance of the Tim Hortons chain and the introduction in December of an option allowing customers to substitute a salad or baked potato, for the normal side order of fries. Aussie exports to Japan firm January saw Australian beef exports to Japan hold firm, with 21,053 metric tons shipped during the month,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
The Cattlemen’s Beef Board seated new board members and elected officers and representatives for its 2005 executive committee and beef promotion operating committee during its annual meeting in San Antonio, TX, Feb. 1-5, 2005. After being appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture in December, a total of 39 board members were seated for service on the CBB in 2005, including 14 reappointments of existing members to a second term and appointment of 25 new members. New members seated and the states they represent are Austin Brown, Texas; Virginia Coelho, California; Bob Combs, Virginia; O.D. Cope, Missouri; Jeff Dahl, North Dakota; Virginia
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Beef producers invested checkoff dollars into promotion, education, research and information programs aimed at extending the upward trend in consumer demand for beef during the last year. These programs are outlined in the 2004 annual report of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, released this week at the Cattle Industry Annual Convention in San Antonio. The annual report highlights some of the leading checkoff programs accomplished during the year and provides detailed, audited financial information for the 2004 fiscal year, which ran Oct. 1, 2003 through Sept. 30, 2004. The report includes state-by-state checkoff revenue listings and compares 2004 expenditures to those in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Vaccination of Yellowstone bison calves and yearlings that enter Montana could begin this season, according to a recent decision by the Montana Department of Livestock. Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine will be used by hand injection. Calves (4-12 months of age) and yearlings (12-24 months of age) captured as a result of other management actions in the western boundary area that test negative for brucellosis are eligible for the vaccine, according to Montana State Veterinarian Dr. Tom Linfield. The Department of Livestock received 66 individual comments and 10 comments on behalf of organizations regarding the Environmental Assessment on vaccination of Bison in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Officials from Nebraska’s office of the state veterinarian announced recently that they suspect an older slaughter cow was infected with bovine tuberculosis (TB). As a result, cattle producers across the state will be holding their breath the next two years hoping another confirmed case of the disease is avoided. The case was found in an older cow that was diagnosed by a USDA inspector at the time of slaughter, according to Nebraska Deputy State Veterinarian Del Wilmot. He also indicated the carcass did not enter the human food supply and is no risk to consumer health. “The first two tests for the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
— Limited trade $1-2 softer. — Packers slow down further. Optimism for a $2-3 stronger fed cattle market early last week hadn’t come to fruition through mid-afternoon Thursday. In fact, the limited cash trade that had happened as of press time Thursday was mostly $1-2 lower than the week prior. After gaining more than $1.50 Monday through Wednesday, the first few listed live cattle futures contracts slid more than $1.50 Thursday, and that put the brakes on any significant desire from packers to come to the table with anything more than $90 per cwt live, $144 dressed. However, most cattle feeders weren’t ready
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Beef Initiative Group-Canada (BIG) says it is asking western Canadian rural municipalities to endorse its proposal for a farmer-run cattle slaughter-facility in western Canada before it presents the proposal to the federal government. The proposal seeks 100 percent of its funding from the federal government, said a BIG official. The western Canadian producer organization maintains that the reopening of the U.S. border to live Canadian cattle, currently scheduled for March 7, will not solve all of the problems in the domestic industry, as something must still be done with the older animals, said Harvey Harland, the Manitoba representative for BIG. The domestic packing
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Feb 14, 2005
Consumer demand for beef jumped sharply in 2004, with the Beef Demand Index (BDI) climbing 7.74 percent compared to 2003 and more than 25 percent since reversing its 20-year decline in 1998, Cattlemen’s Beef Board outgoing chairman Nelson Curry, Paris, KY, announced during the group’s annual meetings held Feb. 1-5 in San Antonio, TX. “We knew it was a strong year for beef but these preliminary numbers for the demand index really surpass even our most optimistic expectations,” said Curry. “With this continued strength, we’ve far exceeded the goal of the beef industry’s long range plan to increase demand by six
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