Home / Articles / by WLJ
Search: in Authors List
 

WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 30, 2006
—Washington state bill will protect landowners, large and small. Initiative 933 (I-933), a property-rights measure sponsored by the Washington Farm Bureau, is scheduled to be considered by Washington voters on Nov. 7. The initiative, if passed, would require state and local government agencies to either compensate private landowners for regulations that decrease the value of private property, or waive those laws for affected properties. The bill is retroactive and will impact property regulations passed as far back as 1996. Jack Field, executive vice president for Washington Cattlemen’s Association, said the organization is fully behind the initiative. “We are fully behind it, a
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
The cows in your herd are there for a reason. For profit’s sake, let’s hope it’s not just because you can’t catch them. How did they get on the place, and why do you let them stay? You should consider those questions for each cow, but start with the big picture. Why do you have cows? That’s a deeper question than you can answer in a few seconds. Many people looking for even deeper answers have purchased Rick Warren’s spiritual bestseller, “The Purpose-Driven Life.” In the last few years, his concepts have spread to the business world. You can now find
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
Someone's got to do it One thing about the cattle business is when it’s good for one segment, it generally gets good for all segments. The yearling business has maintained a good head of steam despite a threatening corn market. Yearling cattle are still trading at $110 or so and calves are staying strong as promising winter grass conditions develop. The purebred side of this cattle business has been remarkable. Perhaps I should say the Angus business has been remarkable. The trickle-down theory works pretty well and the purebred breeders are certainly getting their due by providing good genetics to
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), with the help of the Beef Checkoff Program, has conducted a study to identify ways to possibly increase the demand for beef. The long-range goal of the cattle industry is to increase beef demand 10 percent by 2010. With this in mind, checkoff dollars were used to assess the “beef brand.” Rick Husted, chief operating officer of NCBA, describes the “beef brand” as “everything about beef that makes up consumers’ perceptions about your product (beef).” The study assessed consumer behaviors and attributes about beef and competing proteins. The results are currently being socialized throughout
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
There was some early, light trade last week in Nebraska at $135 dressed basis while most dressed offers were holding firm in a range of $140-142 in the northern Plains. In the south, offers were in the $90 range with buyers offering only $85 for inventories, which were slightly larger than the prior week. Analysts were calling for trade steady with the previous week, when trade finally developed in earnest. The last substantial trade was at $87-88 live basis and $135-138 dressed two weeks ago. Feedlots were holding out for higher money last week as a result of higher boxed
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
The practice of implanting stocker and feeder cattle is widely believed to be the single most profitable practice a producer can implement. However, for a variety of reasons, including the growing natural beef market and problems with end quality, only about 30 percent of cattle producers use growth implants. Implants rely on extremely low doses of hormones or similar compounds to boost daily gain in cattle. “Developing a good implant strategy can improve daily gains by up to 20 percent, improve efficiency up to 15 percent, and potentially reduce production costs by at least 10 percent,” said Dan Loy, Iowa State
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
The worldwide picture for U.S. beef exports looks positive, according to Clayton Yeutter, and that’s good news for cattlemen. Speaking at a joint meeting of the Texas Cattle Feeders Association (TCFA) and the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA) in Amarillo, Yeutter told cattlemen that there is some good news in the international competitive picture. Cattle feeders were in Amarillo for the TCFA annual convention and TSCRA members gathered for their fall board and committee meetings. Yeutter, a past USDA secretary and former U.S. trade representative, believes that beef’s traditional export markets will come back fairly quickly and that’s encouraging
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
It is hard to imagine. Sure, we watched, helplessly, as storms slammed into our Gulf Coast, leaving nothing but destruction in their wake. We watched, as our fellow Americans struggled to cope with the massive blow that Mother Nature dealt them, with a surreal, almost dream-like quality. But it’s nearly impossible to understand the devastation that hit our southern neighbors in the state of Louisiana when two storms, Katrina and Rita, made landfall over one year ago. Homes were destroyed, lives were lost, and the landscape was forever changed. One of the most popular cities in the U.S. was leveled by
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
Most of the country will see winter temperatures above normal, though slightly cooler than last year’s very warm winter, according to the winter weather outlook announced today by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). According to scientists at the NOAA Climate Prediction Center who produce the outlook, drought conditions also are expected to improve in most areas of the Southwest, while some drought conditions are anticipated in parts of the Pacific Northwest. The projections, based on the last edition of the U.S. Seasonal Outlook, were issued by NOAA in conjunction with the 2006-2007 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference. Weak El Niño
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
Fall is finally here and the sound of bawling calves can be heard for miles around ranches. It is time for many producers to market their calves and choose which cows to cull and which to keep for another winter. Many ranchers will utilize their local auction markets to sell their calves and cull cows. Those producers’ $1-per-head checkoff assessment will be automatically collected by brand inspectors or the auction market when their cattle are sold. But for those producers who don’t market their cattle through an auction market facility—for the producers who sell via private treaty—what are their responsibilities
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 23, 2006
Over the years that I have been traveling, I have had the opportunity to attend quite a few benefit auctions and banquets and, for the most part, they are all the same. But as with everything, there are exceptions. A couple of weeks ago, Geri and I had the opportunity to attend the Magic of the Vine benefit dinner and auction held on the grounds of the Jim and Sue Coleman estate. The Coleman’s generously hosted this wonderful event in conjunction with their annual female sale that was held the next day. The benefit was for the Angus Foundation and
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
What to compare? How do you know if you are doing better or worse than you were in your business five years ago? You probably have a gut reaction that popped into your head immediately when you read that question. Did you hear yourself put a question mark at the end of your answer? “Better…I guess,” you might have thought to yourself. If you are not sure, then we have some work to do. I know you like the part of the business that allows you the freedom to work with the animals and be part of the best industry in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
Constitutional debate Since the U.S. House of Representatives voted two months ago to ban the slaughter of horses for human consumption, there has been a great deal of head scratching about what to do next. The most common belief in the industry, with many basing their argument on private property rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution, seems to be that the bill is unconstitutional. There is, apparently, a widespread belief that the government can’t ban the slaughter of horses because it would prevent horse owners from doing as they please with their property. In fact, the opposite is true. The government
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
Short bought packers last week jumped into the market early and got trade started at levels lower than the prior week. A combination of factors, including seasonal softening beef demand at the consumer level and a sharp decline in the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) live cattle contracts on Monday worked against cattle feeders who, last Wednesday and Thursday, sold cattle in a range of $86-$87 live and $135-$138 dressed in the north and $87-88.50 in the southern Plains. Packer interest tapered off once moderate trade had developed, indicating they were not interested in buying more cattle than necessary to meet
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
Johne’s disease (which is pronounced Yo-knees) was identified more than a century ago, but it remains common and oftentimes costly, even in today’s industry. In 1895, the first case of Johne’s was documented by a German veterinarian, Dr. H. A. Johne. Johne’s is a disease that affects the intestinal tracts of ruminants and has been documented across the globe. The perception among cattle producers is that Johne’s is predominately a “dairy disease.” Quite to the contrary, there have been several documented cases of the disease in beef cattle herds as well. In 1997, a study was completed by the National
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
— Negative per head returns finally take their toll. Three of the four major packing companies last week took a step toward improving profitability when they announced immediate cuts in the processing shifts at their beef plants. Analysts had been predicting the move for weeks as projected packer margins fell farther and farther behind break-even prices. Bob Price at North American Risk Management Services, Inc. said the cutbacks were a result of all the usual concerns, such as poor margins, lower priced competing meats, and difficult trading conditions overseas. The largest of the companies announcing cutbacks, Springdale, AR-based Tyson Foods, said the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
Pasture restoration Over the years, I have had people state to me, “I have cheatgrass in certain areas of my pasture. What should I do?” I usually can't answer that question right away. Mainly because in most circumstances, cheatgrass is not the real problem, it’s a symptom of something. Cheatgrass, being an annual plant, must come from seed each year and is usually the first plant on site after some kind of disturbance has occurred. I usually ask myself when on-site, why the heck is the cheatgrass growing here in the first place? Now I’m getting ahead of myself. Let’s go through a
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
According to an announcement made last week, USDA will begin accepting feeder cattle prices reported on a delivered basis with a freight adjustment. The alteration will improve prices which are reported to the marketplace. USDA, in making the announcement last week, said the delivered basis transactions will be included with those already being collected and reported on a free on board (F.O.B.) basis, and will be eligible for inclusion in the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Feeder Cattle Index. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) pushed USDA to make the change after much discussion by its membership over concerns about the low
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released the October crop production report on Oct. 12. Contrary to many pre-report estimates for the crop, USDA lowered expectations. Corn production is forecast at 10.9 billion bushels, 2 percent lower than last month and also 2 percent lower than the actual production in 2005. NASS predicted national yields would average 153.5 bushels per acre harvested, down 1.2 bushels from last month, but still 5.6 bushels higher than 2005.   “The USDA Crop Production report released this morning was a bit of a shocker and supports the recent run-up in corn prices in both the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 16, 2006
The U.S. is unprepared for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), a study conducted by the Center for Animal Disease Modeling and Surveillance (CADMS) in the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) concluded. The research, funded by USDA and the Department of Homeland Security, shows there are a few keys to controlling the spread of the disease in the event of an outbreak. One of the most pressing concerns of the industry right now is a potential introduction of FMD. Researchers found that since there has not been a recent case of FMD in the U.S., it


Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar
 

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!