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WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Sep 4, 2006
In 2001 an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the United Kingdom (UK) resulted in catastrophic economic losses exceeding $15 billion. The cost to livestock producers was estimated to be nearly $1 billion and at least 6 million animals were slaughtered. Any outbreak of FMD in the US today, where the density of livestock animals is high, would likely be as devastating as the one that hit the UK in 2001.   With no recent FMD outbreak to use as an example, it is hard to predict how an outbreak might spread in today’s US. Current information on precise animal locations, movement
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 28, 2006
— Report suggests lack of marbling leading challenges. Every five years, the National Beef Quality Audit (NBQA) is conducted to access the current successes and challenges of the beef cattle industry as well as to establish goals for future years. The most recent study was conducted between July 2005 and June 2006. The audit includes interviews with beef and beef product export decision makers, purveyors, restaurants, food service operators and supermarkets. In addition, specific quality data was collected at 16 U.S. packing facilities. The audit collected data for live cattle, carcasses on the harvest floor and carcasses after chilling and after
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 28, 2006
— Placements 17 percent above last year. — Marketings slightly higher than 2005.   The USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) cattle on feed report released Aug. 18 was mostly in line with analysts’ pre-report expectations. The total number of cattle on feed as of Aug. 1 was up 7 percent over 2005, at 10.82 million, the second highest on record behind 2001 when NASS reported 10.89 million head on feed. The Aug. 1 number is down only 50,000 head from the July 1 number. NASS statistics show the normal decline is closer to 300,000 head between July and August. Erica Rosa, agricultural
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 28, 2006
— Biosecurity measures mean more record keeping.   In December, those in the animal feed business will have new regulations to comply with in regard to transportation. The new set of rules were not introduced recently. In fact, the rules were detailed in the Public Health and Security Preparedness and Response Act that was passed in 2002. However, the regulations are set to take effect in just three months. The new set of guidelines are reportedly designed to protect the food supply from serious threats that could be introduced during transportation of animal feed and other such products. More specifically, the regulations
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 28, 2006
— On feed report does little to move market despite jump in placements.   Fed cattle trade last week was at a virtual standstill with offers last Thursday at $88 live basis and $139-$141 on dressed cattle. Packers were still about $5 below live and $5-6 on the dressed asking prices at press time last week. Trade was expected to be at least steady to higher when it did finally occur last week.   “Producers have every reason to hold firm given the packers’ record of caving in at the last minute and having the economic incentive to add weight,” said Andy Gottschalk
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 14, 2006
— Yet another shot at a repeal down the drain. The Senate voted late Thursday, Aug. 3, to yet again refuse a repeal of the estate tax, commonly known as the death tax. The most recent rejection was H.R. 5970, a bill that would not only significantly cut the estate tax , but also increase the federal minimum wage. The bill would have essentially increased minimum wage from $5.15 an hour to $7.25 and by 2015, increased
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 14, 2006
Congress passed legislation last week which will greatly enhance the benefits for ranchers who enter into a conservation easement on their property so long as the easement will keep the ranch in production agriculture. According to California Rangeland Trust, the Pension Protection Act of 2006 (HR 4) includes provisions that will allow ranchers who donate land for conservation purposes to receive an increased deduction, while ensuring that those lands will remain in agricultural production. The adjusted deduction for conservation easement donations ensures
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 14, 2006
— Fed cattle $5-6 higher live and $6-7 higher dressed. — Feeder cattle follow feds higher. Packers stepped up to the plate early last week and paid sharply higher prices for cattle in both the north and south Plains. Trading occurred late Wednesday afternoon at $86 live basis in the south, $5-6 higher than the previous week. In the northern Plains, packers paid $136 live, $6-7 higher than the prior week. Volume was reportedly good with feedlots in Texas, Kansas and Nebraska each trading
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 14, 2006
The hay market across the country remains very strong with prices at their highest point in recent years. In fact, in some areas hurt by heat, drought and a lack of production, prices are through the roof, according to brokers. Dryland alfalfa and most grass hay production is significantly below normal in much of the Great Plains and with a lack of carryover from 2005 and crop failures in states like Texas and Oklahoma, the competition for hay is causing some producers
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Aug 7, 2006
— USDA halts rule-making process. USDA has rescinded a proposal which would have allowed imports of Canadian cattle over 30 months of age, saying there won’t be a ruling on the case until it has completed its investigation into the most recent case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The most recent case, announced last month, was found in an animal just 50 months old. That animal had been born nearly four years after Canada’s ruminant animal feed ban was enacted.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
When it comes to the humane treatment of animals, I don’t think there is a stockman alive that would blatantly harm their stock. Some animals need a bit more convincing than others, but that goes for people as well What to do with an animal that has lived its useful life? Our general Christian values force us to treat every person and every animal with respect, and in many cases, terminating an animal is the most respectful option available.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
— Stockdogs fill valuable roles on ranches across the globe. For centuries, stockdogs have served not only as companions to ranchers herding cattle or sheep on the desolate range where an echo travels without interruption for miles, but also as irreplaceable ranch hands. The skill, the know-how and the passion of the four-legged creatures corralling stock in the middle of the range is a fascinating partnership. The vast range provides no assistance—no fence to guide the animals, no high-tech facilities—just the rancher on horseback and the dog, working side
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
— Potential energy corridors spider across the land, but will landowners be affected? Innovative ways to effectively and economically transmit energy across the West are stirring controversy among landowners. A map was recently released, showing energy transmission routes, or corridors, across the West. Although economics is at the forefront of the decision making, and the possible establishment of a more secure and stable energy infrastructure for the U.S., the issue with landowners and ranchers is the claim that they have yet to be involved in the planning and preliminary
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
The news of Japan didn’t move the market last week and as of Thursday afternoon, trade was still at a halt, despite rumors of packers being short for the week in the north. Previous week trade occurred in the south Plains at $79-79.50. Live sales in the northern Plains traded at $80- 80.50 live basis with dressed sales at $126-127, mostly $126. Brent Snyder, market analyst for Texas Cattle Feeders Association, said the market this week was difficult to call.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
— Drought continues to push cattle to feedlots early. — Analysts say feedlots are slipping behind in marketing efforts. The July 1, cattle on feed report contained a surprise in the form of a much higher than anticipated placement number. After the unexpected drop in placements during May, it appears the placement rate has evened out and drought has continued to pushed a large number of lightweight calves into feedlots early this year.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
Transportation costs continue to skyrocket, not only for those shipping cattle across the country, but also for the general consumer. With no relief in sight, cattlemen may limit shipping cattle, and consumers are already spending less for food in an effort to cut costs. The average retail price for regular gasoline in the U.S. increased by nearly two cents last week and the trend is expected to continue. The average price for a gallon of gas was $2.99 as of last Monday,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
The recent heat wave that has scorched the West is doing more damage than burning up crops and drying out stock ponds. In California last Wednesday, after almost two weeks of triple-digit temperatures, there was yet another severe weather warning, predicting temperatures between 105-115 degrees in areas of San Joaquin County, Fresno County and parts of Tulare County. Cattle across the state are being affected by the heat and San Joaquin County estimates 120 dairy cattle are dying every day. “We don’t know
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
Cattle producers across the U.S. were shocked to discover U.S. soldiers serving overseas may not be eating U.S. beef. Instead, whether to save money or for convenience, our troops are eating beef from other undisclosed sources. Lloyd B. Knight, executive vice president for Idaho Cattlemen Association (ICA) said, “One of our folks, Cevin Jones, brought the resolution to us—that troops in Iraq aren’t getting U.S. beef, that instead, the troops are getting beef or beef substitutes from the Middle East, and the Pfizer
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
— Another attempt at trade resumption energizes cattlemen. Japanese officials announced last Thursday they were satisfied with inspections of U.S. packing plants and were set to resume beef imports from animals under 20 months of age. The agreement requires all specified risk materials to be removed from beef shipped overseas. The announcement came after a month long tour of the 35 plants approved by USDA for export to Japan. Inspectors found no problems at 20 of the plants
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 31, 2006
Earl Adam Smith, of Antelope, OR, died Saturday, July 22. He was 88. A grave side service was held July 27, at Juniper Haven Cemetery. Smith was born March 26, 1918, in Mayville, OR, to Earl and Gladys Smith. He graduated from Condon High School and attended Oregon State University. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a staff sergeant during World War II. He married Ann Anderson on Aug. 30, 1946, in Vancouver, WA. A cattle rancher, Smith was appointed by three governors to the state Board of Agriculture, and he


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