Home / Articles / by WLJ
Search: in Authors List
 

WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 22, 2007
—Studies begin to question sustainability of the ethanol industry. The ethanol industry, the focus of much attention after corn prices skyrocketed last year, has been experiencing a massive slowdown in recent months. Reports of delayed construction or expansion have caused concern among investors and the industry’s usage of corn may not reach projected levels this year, according to some industry experts. In 2006, approximately 14 percent of the corn crop went toward the production of ethanol, compared with just 11 percent in 2002. Although there is much debate on the matter, this year, ethanol production could use as much as 20
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 22, 2007
—Studies begin to question sustainability of the ethanol industry. Fed cattle trade was off to a slow start last week as traders waited for the USDA cattle on feed report before exchanging cattle for cash. Expectations of increased placements and lower marketings did little to dampen hopes of higher cash for the week, however. As of Thursday, analysts were expecting cash trade to develop $1 higher, at $94 live and $141-144 dressed. Cash trade the week prior in the south came at mostly $92.50, while farther north, Nebraska and Colorado cattle traded from $90-92.50, with dressed sales from $140-143. Dressed sales
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 22, 2007
—Studies begin to question sustainability of the ethanol industry. FUSDA moved its corn crop expectations higher as part of the Oct. 1 Crop Production report. According to National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), the total national corn production will reach 13.3 billion bushels, up 26 percent from 2006. The number was on the low end of analysts’ expectations and the news spurred corn prices to move slightly higher following the report, according to Virginia Tech Commodity Marketing Agent Mike Roberts. Based on crop conditions when the report was compiled, yield will average 154.7 billion bushels of corn per acre nationally, up 5.6
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
All the fence building, hay baling, calf weaning and hundreds of other production tasks would be for nothing if the beef consumers of this nation disregarded our products. Beef industry leaders have focused on beef product demand and the results have been encouraging. Near record cattle and beef prices are partly the result of attentive action toward beef eating quality and consumer satisfaction, and we salute NCBA (National Cattlemen’s Beef Association) as the driving force enhancing beef demand. Consumers choose beef because we like the taste. Even though the science and physiology of taste are complicated, every beef lover understands
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
The pre-cattle on feed report estimates released by analysts last week indicate that the number of cattle placed in feedlots last month will be higher than year ago figures. The 2006 drought, which impacted a large swath of the Plains region, drove calves to feedlots early. Other calves were held over by producers to take advantage of premiums for heavier yearling cattle. The result was a dip in placements last fall. This year’s numbers are expected to be closer to the five-year average, however, analysts noted last week there will be distinct differences in placement weights and where calves have
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
It’s about time A steer finishes at USDA Prime Yield Grade 2 at the peak of seasonal demand, winning premiums of more than $250. He and his owners wasted no time. The steer was the product of timed breeding one day in April, in a heat-synchronized herd of heifers. They were managed so as to calve 30 to 45 days ahead of the main cow herd. That allowed them more time to adjust to being new mothers before rebreeding a bit later the next year on time-grazed pastures. But that’s another story. Before he was born, a veterinarian confirmed his arrival date.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
In need of repair Two major ground beef recalls have brought to light a growing consumer dissatisfaction with the government’s inspection protocols. In fact, over the past few years, a number of high profile food recalls including peanut butter, spinach, ground beef and, most recently, turkey pot pies, have consumers questioning the safety of the U.S. food supply. The recall of 21.7 million pounds of ground beef processed at Topps Meat in New Jersey, and an additional 845,000 pounds from a plant in Wisconsin, only serves to further weaken consumer demand for our product at a time when it is already
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
Congress vows action to end export of horses as part of HSUS campaign. State laws passed in Texas and Illinois have effectively ended the slaughter of horses in the U.S., although the DeKalb, IL-based Cavel International plant operators may still have the opportunity to appeal. It was unclear last week whether an appeal to the U.S.  Supreme Court would proceed. However, that hasn’t ended the slaughter of horses. As anticipated prior to the de facto ban, the number of horses being sent to Mexico and Canada for slaughter has jumped significantly since last year. Canada, too, has stepped in to fill the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
South Korean officials recently halted quarantine inspections of U.S. beef imports and again asked the U.S. government to immediately stop any shipments. The report marks another violation in a series of seesaw beef trade negotiations between the U.S. and South Korea. Korea, which does not accept beef with bones or beef from cattle aged over 30 months, has repeatedly discovered shipments containing materials in violation of the current trade standards. On Oct. 5, Korean inspectors found vertebral bone pieces in a 30.3 kilogram box contained in an 18.5 metric ton shipment of U.S. beef. According to a Meat and Livestock Australia
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
Grazing corn residues is one way to reduce the cost of wintering beef cows in the upper Midwest, a North Dakota State University (NDSU) cattle expert says. “With the increase in corn acres in North Dakota and the surrounding region this year, availability of corn residue also has increased, making this practice even more attractive,” says Greg Lardy, NDSU Extension beef cattle specialist. Corn residue left behind after harvest includes the stalk, leaf, husk and cob, as well as downed ears. The amount of downed ears varies with the corn variety, but it can be as much as three to five bushels
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
As the cattle industry changes, so too must the organizations that represent livestock owners and producers. Production costs and challenges continue to mount and ranchers need all the help they can get on their own operations, let alone having to constantly fret what affects them from the outside. Most ranchers, along with a large part of the general populace, dislike national politics because they feel too far removed from the process to have any impact. In many cases, livestock producers become disenfranchised with the policy process because they feel their voice is not heard. In April of 2007, a new livestock
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 15, 2007
Many producers in the southern Plains rely heavily on grazing wheat pasture in the winter as an integral part of their annual production strategies and an important part of their yearly income. Farmers who also own cattle can usually take advantage of the cheap cost of gain using stocker cattle, with relatively little impact to the gross profit margins of their wheat. Farmers with no cattle will still normally offer their wheat pasture to cattlemen who need a forage resource in the winter, but don’t want to put up with the high cost of hay. This year, however, wheat prices are
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 1, 2007
—Demand for Certified Hereford Beef growing 25 percent annually. The American Hereford Association (AHA) hosted its first-ever media fly-in event at its headquarters in Kansas City, MO, on Sept. 24-25. Members of various top-tier beef industry publications were on hand to hear about AHA’s objectives, news updates, and progress. David Mehlhaff, AHA’s newly appointed director of communications, spearheaded organization of the event and ensured that prominent AHA members and staff were on hand to help give media representatives the proper insight into AHA’s exciting initiatives. “Our first priority with this event was making sure that we are able to let producers and
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 1, 2007
—Packers are losing money with cutout stalled below $148. Fed cattle trade was extremely slow last week. Packers were offering $92 and feeders were looking for $96. Futures markets started the week with a roar after a bullish cattle on feed report, but slowly declined by mid-week with the October contract at $96.95. The general tone of the fed cattle markets was that prices would be higher and it was apparent trade would take place Friday. There were roughly 2,500 head traded in the southern Plains early in the week at $95.50, JBS Swift was the buyer. Last Thursday morning,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 1, 2007
Colorado State University (CSU) Extension recently issued new rules regarding the implementation of premise ID for 4-H participants. The new rules are the result of a year’s worth of public comment on the issue, which appeared to CSU officials to be mostly negative. Some producers have indicated that CSU’s change may also be a result of a recent incident at the 2007 Colorado State Fair in Pueblo in which 4-H’ers participating in the livestock show were required to register their premise under the National Animal Identification System (NAIS). The requirement implemented at the 2007 State Fair was decided by the Colorado
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 1, 2007
Race for the case There is a lot to be thankful for in the cattle markets. Calves are selling well, yearling cattle are selling extremely well, and fed cattle have found a solid home in the $90s, although profits at the cattle feeding level are slim to none. It seems like a time to be content with the cattle business. The supply of fed cattle is tight, the supply of suitable feeder cattle is tighter, and it all looks good for the foreseeable future. There are, however, several items developing that could throw a few bumps in the road for beef
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 1, 2007
Beef goes even more global The beef industry just keeps on getting more global. Consider these recent developments. Brazil’s largest beef packer acquires the third largest packer in the U.S. and the largest in Australia to become the largest beef processor in the world. It starts selling Australian beef to Brazil. Meanwhile, Cargill, the world’s second largest processor, starts selling Australian grain-fed beef in the U.S. As startling as these moves might appear, there’s nothing new about the global nature of the meat business. The only difference between now and 100 years ago is that in the early 1900s, the global
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 1, 2007
— Cattle on feed numbers total 10.3 million head, down 6 percent from 2006. — Placements drop 7.5 percent. — Marketings, even with last year, remain a blemish in an otherwise bullish report. The Sept. 1 cattle on feed report contained more good news for cattle feeders and cow/calf producers. On feed and placement numbers were inline with analyst’s pre-report expectations. As expected, it was the third consecutive month showing lighter placements and tighter fed cattle supplies ahead, paving the way for strong markets well into next year. The number of cattle on feed totaled 10.3 million head on Sept. 1, 2007. The
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 1, 2007
—Committee forced to cut more than $1.8 million in proposals. The Beef Promotion Operating Committee last week funded a total of 42 program proposals with beef checkoff dollars for Fiscal 2008. At the same time, however, a tight budget forced the committee to reject more than $1.8 million in proposals to stay within the Cattlemen’s Beef Board’s (CBB’s) $46.8 million national program budget for the coming year. “This was one of the most difficult Operating Committee meetings I’ve been through during all the years I’ve served on it because of all the tough choices we had to make,” said CBB Chairman Ken
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Oct 1, 2007
Regenerate the land with the tool of grazing How do you regenerate land? Answer, use your grazing animals. If done right, they will add “pizzazz” energy and vigor back into your soils. The word pizzazz means dazzling; flamboyance; flair; vigorous spirit; energy and excitement. Nice goal, and profitable. Grazing by livestock can be viewed as a tool that either builds lands up (regenerates them) or tears them down (degrades them). Grazing thought of as a tool becomes similar to a carpenter’s hammer, which can be used to build things up or tear them down. It’s all in the hands of the


Sales Calendar

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!