Home / Articles / by WLJ
Search: in Authors List
 

WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 21, 2005
The Montana Stockgrowers Association (MSGA) applauded members of the Montana House of Representatives for passing HB 406, the "Country of Origin Placarding Act," with an amendment to postpone implementation until October 2006 when the national country-of-origin-labeling is scheduled to be in place. The bill, which passed the House by 63-37, requires specific commodities offered for sale in Montana to be displayed with a placard indicating country of origin of that food. The law will require producers, growers and shippers of beef, processed whole grains, honey, pork, poultry, and lamb to label each individual portion, piece or package of that commodity in
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 21, 2005
Two bills pertaining to a national animal identification program were introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives last week. One bill covers the topic of protection of personal information, which is crucial to many producers. The other bill requires the establishment of a nationwide electronic livestock identification program within 90 days of its enactment. Both bills were introduced by Rep. Collin Peterson, D-MN. Peterson is fired up about implementing a mandatory national animal ID system because it offers the opportunity to isolate and contain livestock diseases that might be introduced into the U.S. “It’s not necessarily just BSE,” said Peterson. “What I’m
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 21, 2005
Judith (Little) LaFranchi Judith Antoinette LaFranchi, 66, passed away February 15, 2005. LaFranchi was born January 19, 1939, on the Onyett Dairy in Gridley, CA, to Irvin Leroy Little and Ella Onyett Little. LaFranchi attended College of the Pacific and graduated from Sonoma State College with a Master’s degree. LaFranchi began showing Guernsey dairy cattle in 4-H at the age of 10 and won her first Showmanship class in 1951. Over the years she won numerous contests and was named California Guernsey Queen for the 100th California State Fair. In 1962 she married fellow dairyman Henry LaFranchi of Calistoga. They showed Ayrshire
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 21, 2005
— Calves, yearlings strong on fed profits. Fed cattle markets were quiet most of last week, feeders were looking to get $94-95 on the heels of a very active market a week earlier, which was the result of a combination of seasonal Easter demand and the Canadian border remaining closed. Packers were offering $88, and they weren’t getting much bought through Thursday. Other than formula cattle, just a handful traded in the northern Plains at $149 dressed, $92 live, $1-2 lower than the prior week. Northern feeders were again early to trade while southern Plains feeders were comfortable with current inventory. The April
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 21, 2005
Some regions of the country have been experiencing pressing problems from sandbur outbreak. Sandbur can seriously harm grazing in cool season grass pastures, but University of Nebraska-Lincoln forage specialist Bruce Anderson says that making plans to control sandbur now can preserve the forage value of a pasture. Sandbur is a warm season grass that is treated like an annual. This grass will start growing in mid-May or June, about the same time as many other perennial warm-season annual grasses like foxtail or crabgrass begin to grow. At first, Anderson says it is a short leafy grass, and there is no big
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 21, 2005
Recent court decisions regarding the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (WSRA) have heightened awareness of possible ramifications of a misapplication of this law on the beef industry. With another Wild and Scenic Rivers case decision pending, producers may need to advocate to maintain grazing in these areas. In the 1960s, Congress created the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System to protect and preserve rivers in response to concerns that rivers were being dammed, dredged, diked, diverted and degraded at an alarming rate. In October 1968, the newly enacted Wild and Scenic Rivers Act pronounced that, “certain selected rivers of the Nation
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 21, 2005
Officials with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) confirmed with WLJ last week that they are considering pulling the 20-month-and-under cattle rule from Japanese consideration if the Pacific Rim nation continues to refuse to move forward with the process to reopen its border to U.S. beef. In addition, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said his agency may not hand over any more documentation on the BSE issue until Japan makes that “good faith effort.” “We have done everything they have asked for and more as it concerns making sure BSE has no chance of entering their country,” one USDA trade
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
McDonald's reports sales increase McDonald's Corporation last week announced a 4.4 percent increase in February for global systemwide sales, compared with February 2004. Comparable sales for McDonald's restaurants worldwide increased 1.6 percent, marking the 22nd consecutive month McDonald's has reported an increase in global comparable sales. McDonald's CEO Jim Skinner said, "The ongoing strength of the strategic U.S. menu, marketing and service initiatives, as well as strong consumer response to our nationally advertised Chicken Selects sampling event, contributed to the monthly performance.” Wendy's reports weak February Wendy's International Inc. said its same-store sales last month were down 2.4 percent, compared to February of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Many U.S. cattle and beef market analysts Monday criticized R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America (R-CALF) for seeking a court injunction blocking imports of younger live cattle from Canada, saying that questioning the safety of Canadian cattle could hurt U.S. demand if the conditions are right. They say that by having a U.S. cattle producers group imply that Canadian cattle are suspect for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), U.S. consumers might deduce that U.S. cattle and beef is also suspect if BSE should ever show up in a domestic U.S. animal. Even though a Washington state cow was diagnosed with BSE, she was imported
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Stress is an unfortunate part of a new calf’s life. Stress on newborn calves is almost inevitable, but what if there was a means to help calves fight infection during stressful times? Agriculture Research Service scientists, as part of a national program, decided to research animal stress and have developed a formula that is proving to “give calves a boost” during transitions or other stressful times. Before the scientists could develop a formula, they first had to see whether current production practices are severely stressing animals. ARS said if the researchers found this to be the case, then the scientists wanted
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Beefnet, an Internet cash commodity exchange, announced a partnership with Union Ganaderas de Chihuahua. The Union, a cattle association in Chihuahua, Mexico, plans to market Mexican producer cattle over the Internet using the Beefnet Exchange. The complex world of purchasing cattle in Mexico has forever frustrated U.S. buyers. The development of the Internet and the ability to trade directly with the cattle owners will mean major improvements for both buyers and sellers, according to a Beefnet press release. A centralized marketplace will allow the best buyer to find the best seller resulting in improved pricing for both. Lower transactions cost created by
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
McDonald's reports sales increase McDonald's Corporation last week announced a 4.4 percent increase in February for global systemwide sales, compared with February 2004. Comparable sales for McDonald's restaurants worldwide increased 1.6 percent, marking the 22nd consecutive month McDonald's has reported an increase in global comparable sales. McDonald's CEO Jim Skinner said, "The ongoing strength of
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
A team of scientists at Hokkaido University is developing an automated device to detect BSE using blood samples from live cattle, according to the Japanese press. The team, led by Mamoru Tamura, a professor at the Research Institute for Electronic Science at the university, hopes to develop the device by this summer. Detecting BSE in young cattle has been thought to be difficult because the type of protein found in the brain of infected cows, prion, accumulates as the animals age. The scientists said the new device will pave the way for establishing a faster and more accurate testing method for the disease,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
—If confirmed, Johnson would be first professional scientist to lead EPA President Bush elevated Stephen Johnson, the acting head of the Environmental Protection Agency, nominating him to the top job on a full-time basis March 4. Bush called Johnson “the first professional scientist to lead the EPA.” Johnson, a career government employee who has been with the agency 24 years, had become its temporary head six weeks ago. Bush announced the nomination in a ceremony in the White House Roosevelt Room. “He knows the EPA from the ground up and has a passion for its mission,” Bush said. If confirmed by the Senate,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
What do producers get when they have a full herd of cows in one calving pasture with calves ranging from one day old to forty-one days old? University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) animal scientists say for many producers, they get calf scours. As calving season progresses, calving pastures become more populated and some calves start getting scours. However, some Nebraska researchers have been studying ways to prevent calf scours. After five years of testing their method, UNL researchers are promoting a system they believe will help producers lessen or eliminate scours, if they have previously had scour problems in their herd. Dr. David
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
The U.S. Department of Commerce announced last week that an investigation into Canadian pig imports confirmed that live hogs from north of the border were sold to the U.S. below the U.S. domestic price, and that Canadian hogs in the future should have a tariff against them of just over 10 percent. In its final ruling concerning its countervailing duty investigation, the agency said Canadian pig producers and hog exporters aren’t being provided with “countervailable subsidies,” but that the prices being paid for those pigs entering the U.S. were below U.S. costs of production. The margins of those “undercut” prices ranged
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
The Beef Checkoff Program’s continuing effort to provide product information to the Hispanic market in the United States achieved a milestone with the publication of a new, Spanish-language version of the Beef Made Easy Meat Cut Chart. The Beef Made Easy Meat Cut Chart was first developed in 1999 through the support of the Beef Checkoff Program, as a reference tool to meet the needs of both consumers and retailers. Development and promotion of the Beef Made Easy Meat Cut Chart is coordinated on behalf of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and state beef councils by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA).
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
The fate of the U.S. beef checkoff program could be known by the end of March or first week of April, according to sources from both sides of constitutionality lawsuit. The U.S. Supreme Court could issue its decision in the case during its next set of dates set aside for announcing decisions from cases argued in late 2004. The next decisions from the court are scheduled to be announced on March 22, 23, 29, 30 and April 4. John McBride, director of information for the Livestock Marketing Association (LMA), said it has been indicated to officials with his group that a large
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
Colostrum intake is critical for the newborn calf, says Greg Lardy, a North Dakota State University Extension Service beef cattle specialist. "At birth, a calf's immune system is not fully developed," he says. "The calf must rely on colostrum from the cow until its own immune system is totally functional (about 1 to 2 months of age)." Colostrum contains antibodies or immunoglobulins, necessary protection from disease. For colostrum to be most effective, Lardy recommends the calf receive 1 quart within six hours after birth and a total of 2 to 3 quarts within 12 hours of birth. After that, the calf's gut begins
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Mar 14, 2005
After several victories concerning the Endangered Species Act (ESA) last year, the western ranching industry was dealt a serious blow earlier this year when a Northwest federal court judge ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) violated the act when it relaxed protections on “threatened” wolves. Under the ruling from U.S. District Court Judge Robert E. Jones, Portland, OR, FWS violated the ESA when it implemented a rule allowing ranchers to shoot wolves on sight if they were attacking livestock. That new rule changed the status of several populations of wolves, both domestic and reintroduced species, to “threatened” instead of


Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar