Home / Articles / by WLJ
Search: in Authors List
 

WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 17, 2006
Welcome rains let up just a bit for the Colorado Cattlemen’s Agricultural Land Trust (CCALT) Sunset BBQ at the Rocks, July 8 at the Sinclaire-Brooks Ranch near Sedalia, CO. This event featured a great barbeque dinner, followed by auctions to raise funds to benefit CCALT’s efforts to use conservation easements to help protect Colorado’s ranches and farms.   Hosted by Bill and Joanne Sinclaire, the attendance was good. Preceding the dinner for some 150 people, there was a silent auction of various items and after dinner, an auction that raised as much as $28,000 for use
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 17, 2006
Tyson Foods last week announced a larger than expected cost-cutting plan aimed at returning the world’s largest meat processor to profitability amid volatile market and regulatory conditions. The leader in meat processing said last Thursday it will cut 420 jobs and eliminate 430 open positions by the end of the year as part of an effort to save $200 million. Tyson and other meat producers have been suffering from a drop in demand for poultry and other meat due to avian flu concerns and other factors, leading to a glut of product in the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 17, 2006
Cattlemen in New Mexico and Arizona can breathe a little easier after two wolves preying on cattle were “lethally removed” from the area. After a total of five cows had been killed by wolves, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) acted on July 6, shooting and killing a female Mexican gray wolf. This female was the last surviving member of the Nantac Pack which had been transferred to the Gila National Forest of New Mexico in April. The wolf’s mate has been lethally removed on June 18.   A member of the Mexican Wolf
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
In light of recent legislation in both the House and the Senate proposing to ban antibiotics from livestock feed, some say beef will not be any safer with such measures imposed, according to an Institute of Food Technologists’ study released last week. Chicago Tribune reported the study, conducted by the panel of food scientists and microbiologists, was provoked by marketing campaigns during the past decade by organic food advocates who have suggested there is an overuse of antibiotics making the food less safe for human consumption. The claims stated in the proposed legislation cite
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
Animal health officials confirmed last Tuesday that a beef cow in Manitoba’s Interlake region tested positive for the province’s first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) since their first case turned up in Alberta three years ago. The 15-year-old crossbred cow was born before 1997 when the feed ban was imposed in Canada, which has lessened concerns of animal health officials. Samples of the dead cow were sent to the National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease in Winnipeg for more tests, but officials are confident a positive result will officially confirm the infection.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
— Chinese officials agree to boneless beef imports. The Chinese ministry of Agriculture said on June 29, it would begin conditional beef trade with the U.S. According to Chinese officials, boneless beef imports from cattle under 30 months of age will be allowed into the country. “The General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine will issue and implement the specific requirements for inspecting (U.S. beef) imports,” said a notice from the Agriculture Ministry.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
The cattle industry is in a remarkable situation; beef demand this summer has been awesome. It would appear consumers want their beef and price hasn’t been much of an issue. High fuel costs, though, keep consumers away from the meat case because it’s disposable income that buys beef. Given choices, people want to eat beef. It’s really that simple. The cattle markets have been a nice surprise this summer. Roughly 90 days ago, all the market analysts were telling us we were going
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
The USDA’s June Acreage and Grain Stocks report gave a boost to the grain market last week. However, dry conditions in areas of the Corn belt, particularly the west and southern edges, are causing increased concern about this year’s crop yields. The total number of acres planted increased from the March planting intentions report. The number of acres planted is estimated at 79.4 million acres, approximately 3 percent more than indicated by the March report but below expectations. In total, this year’s planted
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
Fed cattle trade was at a standstill last Thursday with packers and feeders several dollars between asking and offer prices. Thursday afternoon, $5 split the two. Jim Gill at Texas Cattle Feeders Association said he didn’t expect trade to develop until late Friday. “We haven’t seen a trade one. People are going to be asking $85-86 and packers will be offering $81, is my guess. I think we stand a
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
— Environmental group stops Idaho grazing outfit. Ranchers and those who support grazing on public lands have recently lost another battle to the Western Watersheds Project and their executive director, Jon Marvel. In the middle of June, a federal judge ruled that sheep grazing in areas of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area (SNRA) in central Idaho be immediately stopped in order to protect streams containing federally protected fish. U.S. District Court Judge B. Lynn Winmill removed the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
—New policies on beef for troops set. Members of the Idaho Cattle Association (ICA) met in Jackpot, NV, June 20-22 for the annual Mid Year Conference. Nearly 150 producers were in attendance as members heard the latest updates on policy priorities important to Idaho’s cattle industry, and those present set new policy positions in place to guide the association in the coming months. The conference was highlighted by the announcement of an Executive Order by Governor Jim
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
One of the most powerful weapons of the IRS is the hobby loss rule in which the IRS seeks to deny tax deductions to those who claim to be operating a business, but who in fact are carrying on a hobby. The hobby loss rule is a way of ascertaining your motive in conducting an activity that has the hallmarks of recreation or pleasure. There are many Tax Court cases that have considered the hobby loss rule in the context of farming activities.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
Over 100 cowboys from across New Mexico converged on Silver City, NM, recently, despite drought and fire, for the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association (NMCGA) mid-year meeting. Caren Cowen, executive director for NMCGA, was pleased by the conference. “It was a good turn out in light of the drought and fires.” Cowen continued, “Policy issues discussed included a measured approach to death tax reform and capitol gains as well as the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
— New rules make compliance easier, reduce costs. A new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rule which regulates concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is garnering support from several livestock and agriculture organizations. The proposed regulation, published in the June 30 Federal Register, makes several changes to portions of EPA’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Effluent Limitation Guidelines for CAFOs. The new rules come as a result of court ordered review of the regulations. Despite the alterations, there are still some issues with the new proposal.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 10, 2006
— Ranchers face financial pressure as grasshoppers hatch. Across the country, cattle producers are worried about the drought, watching their sparse grass slowly wither and brown in the heat, yet another problem is already plaguing many, thousands of grasshoppers competing with cattle for the limited vegetation. “Drought conditions often lead to higher amounts of grasshoppers,” said Dr. Jack Campbell, entomologist at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center. “Grasshoppers thrive on drought.”
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 3, 2006
  According to a release from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Canada is opening its border to a broader range of animals and animal products from the U.S. which were suspended following the confirmation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Washington state in 2003.   “Effective immediately, all classes of U.S. cattle, including those for breeding purposes born after 1999, are eligible for entry based on prescribed certification requirements. As well, beef from cattle over 30 months of age will also be eligible for importation under certain conditions,” the agency said in its release June
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 3, 2006
  Last minute buying by retailers to fill holiday needs and a very positive cattle on feed report boosted the market last week. Although fed cattle trade was slow to get started, as of Thursday, there was some trade in Nebraska at $131-132 dressed while most dressed offers were holding firm in a range of $131-135. In most of the northern tier, feedlot offers stood at $85-86 and in the southern Plains, feedlots were holding out at $86-$87. Expectations for the bulk of northern trade were $132-133 dressed and
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 3, 2006
  There’s no doubt about it, Coloradans love beef, and the responsibility for keeping beef at the forefront as one of the most delicious and nutritional foods anyone can eat has been the work of the Colorado Beef Council (CBC). Prior to his appointment as CBC executive secretary, Fred Lombardi spent 20 years in the food industry with Noble Food Services, which was purchased in 1981 by Sysco and then became Noble/Sysco. During the course of those 20 years, Lombardi worked his way up to become president and CEO of the company.   Lombardi’s tenure with CBC
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 3, 2006
  Last week I was invited to Camp Cooley Ranch in Franklin, TX, to speak to a young cattlemen group. They just had some rain in that part of the country and it was absolutely gorgeous.   Camp Cooley ranch is a unique operation that does demand a bit of attention. Last week they were attempting to do their part in developing the future of the beef industry and felt they needed to start with some of their young customers.   Klaus Birkel, the owner of Camp Cooley, is a fascinating individual. He’s from Germany, and inherited
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Jul 3, 2006
  Earlier this month, 41 senators opposed a permanent estate tax repeal, preventing opponents of the commonly referred to death tax to garner enough votes to repeal the tax indefinitely. Now, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 5638, the Permanent Estate Tax Relief Act. The legislation, passed June 22, would go into place in five years. Taking effect in 2011, it would be exactly one year after the current tax relief package reduces the estate tax to zero. President Bush’s tax cuts reduced estate taxes through 2009, with elimination of the tax for one


Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar