Home / Articles / by WLJ
Search: in Authors List
 

WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
Tyson settles federal case Tyson Foods has paid a $1.5 million fine and its former senior chairman, Don Tyson, has paid $700,000 to settle Securities and Exchange Commission charges that the company had failed to disclose certain benefits paid to Tyson over the past several years. Don Tyson also repaid $1.516 million to the company.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
Canada’s Competition Bureau last week announced it had completed an investigation into allegations that Canadian beef processors colluded and unfairly depressed the prices paid for fed cattle over the last 18 months and found there to be no wrongdoing by packers. The bureau did say that beef prices remained stable with the previous
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
It looks like trade with Japan may happen soon, as it was announced last week that Japan was ready to repeal their 100 percent BSE testing law. This has been the major obstacle in getting any serious negotiations started on resuming trade. Changing this law was absolutely the first thing that had to happen for any trade to start.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
USDA Secretary of Agriculture, Mike Johanns, made a plea to producers for transparency and communication throughout the agriculture industry last week during a message he gave to the National Association of Farm Broadcasters in Washington, D.C. Johanns’ goal was to solicit comments from farmers and ranchers for the new Farm Bill. “The new
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
A struggling futures market and projections for less-than-stellar post Mother’s Day beef demand left cattle feeders settling for cash cattle prices $2-4 softer than the previous week. However, even with that decline, most cattle were bringing a $50-or-more profit to producers. Trade was mostly complete in the northern tier states last Wednesday afternoon,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
— Import rule expected May 27. Changes to Japan’s BSE testing rules are expected to be formally completed May 12, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) last week. In addition, the Japanese Food Safety Commission (FSC) is expected to formally publish proposed
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
The United States’ beef industry lost between $3.2 and $4.7 billion in exports last year since the discovery of the one case of BSE within its borders, according to a study conducted by Kansas State University's Research and Extension department. The report also concluded that voluntary testing for the disease would have provided an economic gain to the beef
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
Promoting the safety of U.S. beef is the primary goal of a week-long tour of U.S. beef industry facilities by South Korean government officials and consumers. If the Korean contingent view the safety protocols in place as sufficient, it is possible a process to resolve the ongoing ban on U.S. beef could be reinitiated.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
An answer to a six-letter bad word Dear Editor: I read with some amusement and a certain amount of amazement Mr. Scheifelbein’s comments in the April 25 issue of your paper. Our society has long accepted that our capitalistic economy should seek and attain a number of goals; efficiency, consumer sovereignty, stable prices, sufficient competition
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
— Cold still a concern. The abnormally wet winter and spring in a large majority of the country has resulted in the best nationwide spring pasture and range conditions so far this decade. According to USDA’s National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS), 57 percent of the pasture and range in the continental U.S. was
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
— Larger shipments slated in mid-May. Taiwanese demand for U.S. beef has been called very good since that country reopened its border to U.S. product April 16. However, the continued exclusion of bone-in product will keep total U.S. beef exports to Taiwan well below pre-BSE levels, according to officials with the U.S. Meat Export Federation
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 9, 2005
Congressional Reps. Bob Goodlatte, R-VA, and Marion Berry, D-AR, introduced a voluntary country-of-origin labeling (COOL) bill for beef, pork and lamb that, if passed, would replace the current mandatory labeling language on the books. The bill was named the Meat Promotion Act of 2005 and designated number HR 2068. Under the proposed language,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 2, 2005
The market situation, international trade, animal ID, beef and other products, demand, and what’s going on in the wholesale and retail sectors are all subjects on the forefront of producers’ minds these days. Jim Robb, center director for Livestock Marketing Information Center (LMIC), recently spoke to producers and other beef industry members about these
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 2, 2005
This is the time of year when carcass data starts to come in on last year's calf crop. The data also provides reflection material on the current bull battery. In the past, the conventional wisdom was that growth was the most important trait. Cow/calf producers, however, know many traits affect the bottom line.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 2, 2005
McDonald’s reports a 42% profit McDonald’s Corp., the world’s largest fast-food chain, reported that better sales in Europe and continued momentum in the U.S. lifted first-quarter profits 42 percent. Net income for the January-through-March quarter was $727.9 million, or 56 cents per share, compared with $511.5 million, 40 cents per share, a year earlier. Results
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 2, 2005
In order for researchers to be able to control a disease, they need to know what spreads the disease. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is one of those diseases which researchers are attempting to identify all of its sources. VSV is a viral disease that primarily affects cattle, horses, and swine. Occasionally sheep and goats can contract the disease. The virus that causes vesicular stomatitis appears to have a wide host range. In affected, VSV causes blister-like lesions to form in the mouth and on the dental pad, tongue, lips, nostrils, hooves, and teats. These blisters swell and break, leaving raw tissue that
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 2, 2005
Over the past few weeks, I have tried to stay away from the ongoing debate over the Canadian border. There’s no doubt that this border issue has had an impact on cattle markets, and this industry is reaping some benefit. Now that we have been able to take a few steps back and attempt to view
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 2, 2005
— Injunction process amended. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, San Francisco, CA, last week ruled that actual proof of harm must be provided before an injunction can be issued against a property owner concerning species protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In addition, the court said that past lack of evidence
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
May 2, 2005
— Questions arise on marketings data. — Feeders, stockers still rallying. After showing signs of getting ready to eclipse $95 live, $152 dressed early in the week, last week’s cash fed cattle market wound up with only moderate trade happening through Thursday at prices barely steady to $1 softer, compared to the previous week.


Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar