Home / Articles / by WLJ
Search: in Authors List
 

WLJ

Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 26, 2007
Time to pony up checkoff dollars It is time we raise the beef checkoff—and I said raise the checkoff, as in, pay at least an additional dollar, if not more, per head—not raze the checkoff! Of course, we wouldn’t need to actually raze the checkoff program, would we? If we simply continue as we are, squabbling with one another over the relative value of the program, complaining still about the measly dollar that we currently pay, then the beef checkoff will just dwindle into a state of useless disrepair. Kind of like a lot of the cattle industry’s infrastructure. Before I
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 26, 2007
U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill of Idaho recently upheld a U.S. Forest Service (USFS) ban on sheep grazing in the Nez Perce National Forest, blocking the sheep of local ranchers from entering the grazing allotment due to perceived conflicts with bighorn sheep, which are native to the area. USFS originally made a decision allowing sheep owned by the Carlson Company entry to the Allison-Berg Allotment in the Nez Perce National Forest, but recently reversed its decision after the Nez Perce tribe filed documents showing a number of bighorn sheep sightings near the grazing allotment. Livestock grazing in areas with bighorn sheep
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 26, 2007
—Nov. 1 on feed numbers down 1.7 percent from 2006. —Fed cattle marketings rise.   There was little in the Nov. 1 cattle on feed report to cause shockwaves in the market last week as numbers were in line with pre-report expectations. On Nov. 16, USDA reported that in feedlots with more than 1,000 head capacity, there were 11.76 million head of cattle on feed. The number was down 1.7 percent from 2006, but it remained 4 percent ahead of the five-year average. The number of cattle on feed remains supportive of the market through the end of the year and into the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
Work mess code   At different times in the past, I held short-lived jobs requiring dress clothes. Picking out different outfits for inside work was, by far, the toughest part of those jobs. Making a decision on slacks and tops every day was no Sunday picnic for me and I developed withdrawals from jeans and sweatshirt comfort. That’s why the clothing attire for ranch work is, by far, my most well-suited dress code. Job descriptions around here require what I call “comfort and practicality” career wear but which is probably viewed as the grunge look of the ’90s. The grunge image incorporates rough-looking
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
According to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Canada’s cattlemen have yet another issue to be concerned with. Last week it was reported that premises in both Alberta and British Columbia have been quarantined following the discovery of a bull which had been found to be positive for bovine tuberculosis (TB). In what has been a string of bad news for cattle producers north of the border, more than 450 head are slated for slaughter and 30 operations will be quarantined after animals there came into contact with the bull which had been shipped between provinces. As of late last week,
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
Pay now, or pay later   Several state cattlemen’s associations have proposals in front of them this fall to raise the beef checkoff assessment to $2 from the current $1 level. In fact, a couple of them have already passed the proposal and will present it to the Annual Cattlemen Industry Association Meeting in Reno, NV, next February for consideration. Since the inception of the beef checkoff, the $1 price tag has been stagnant. It hasn’t changed with cattle prices or inflation and its purchasing power has declined substantially over time. Although there are many who would disagree with the payment, there is
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
—Choice boxed beef prices gain $4.28 in first three days of last week. The fed cattle market rally looked like it was getting underway last week with some limited higher cash trade reported early in the week, including some grid trade in Texas at the $150 level. Last Thursday, there were a few reports of live cattle moving in Texas at $92.50 and reports of bids at $145-146 live basis by packers. However, upward surging boxed beef prices early in the week, along with strength on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME), had feedlots holding out for better offers. Analysts last week said
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
While the daily challenges of owning a farm or a ranch are difficult enough, so too are the hoops ranchers must jump through to ensure the ownership of their enterprise by future generations. The large amounts of capital required to own and operate an agricultural venture are staggering when compared to many small businesses, though the returns are often much smaller. For this reason, agricultural interest groups and prominent senators have begun to urge Congress to repeal or reform the federal estate tax which can cause unexpected costs to a producer’s family members, even when careful estate planning has been exercised.
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
Government meddling threatens cattle industry’s future   Once upon a time, the 2007 Farm Bill was going to be about free market reforms that would reward the innovative, entrepreneurial spirit of our nation’s farmers and ranchers. Time and again, we heard top officials in Washington, D.C., talking of the need to loosen government’s grip on American agriculture. As a National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) member, this was music to my ears. NCBA embraces the philosophy of less government control and interference in our industry. But now the heavy hand of government threatens to make this Farm Bill a disaster for cattlemen. The Senate
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
As drought lingers across some parts of the country and feed prices rise, producers are turning to alternative feeds to see their herds through the winter. In some cases, these feed products are lower quality than the herd may be accustomed to and will require supplementation to minimize problems. The obvious issues occur first with a lack of protein and energy in a feed source. In a joint study conducted by Oregon State University, University of Wyoming, Texas A&M and Utah State University, researchers found that oilseed based supplementation is the most common form of supplementation to provide for the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
Competition for cost-effective livestock feed is forecasted to stay strong, keeping prices high through at least the next marketing year. Feeding corn or soybean meal comes with a high price tag these days, and hay has been no different. The Livestock Marketing Information Center (LMIC) recently released data showing that buyers have paid an average price of $130 for all hay nationwide during the current hay crop marketing year (2007-2008), with the average price for all alfalfa hay forecasted at $135. LMIC reports indicate hay production has steadily declined over recent years, with U.S. hay production in 2006 being at the lowest
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
Most livestock economists would agree that the opportunities available for stocker operators these days are good ones, while many note that a cost-effective feed source is the number one factor in determining the potential profitability of purchasing stocker cattle, not the cattle market itself. With corn and hay prices tight, avoiding supplemental feed is necessary for most farmers and ranchers to turn a profit, which means turning to cheap pasture alternatives for finding good returns in today’s feeder cattle market. Winter rye grazing could be one of those opportunities. High wheat prices have made wheat grazing opportunities few and far between as
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 19, 2007
Menu items for the traditional Thanksgiving dinner with turkey, stuffing, cranberries, pumpkin pie and all the trimmings will cost more this year, but remain affordable, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF). According to AFBF’s 22nd annual informal survey of the prices of basic items found on the Thanksgiving Day dinner table, the average cost of this year’s dinner for 10 is $42.26, a $4.16 price increase from last year’s average of $38.10. “Americans are blessed to have an abundant variety of home-grown food that is produced with pride by our hardworking farmers and ranchers,” said AFBF President Bob Stallman. “During
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 12, 2007
A Share of data Anyone with siblings can recall all the ways they were taught to share. With bunk beds and half the closet space, maybe you had double-occupancy bedrooms. As children, you had to let cousins or friends play with your favorite truck, Barbie or basketball. Remember having to divvy up your Halloween candy so each family member got the same amount? If you didn’t learn it in your younger years, growing up and getting married certainly teaches some lessons in sharing. There are the joint bank accounts, household chores and personal memories. Maturity helps you discover the many benefits that
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 12, 2007
Round two We knew it was going to happen. R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America filed their suit for an injunction on over-30-month (OTM) cattle and beef imports from Canada two weeks ago. USDA published the rule roughly 50 days ago and set Nov. 19 as the start of OTM trade. The complaint filed by R-CALF and a few individuals, along with several consumer groups, read almost exactly like the last injunction they filed, which lost three or four times in various federal courts. I really can’t remember how many anymore, but it looked like the same old deal. The few differences included
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 12, 2007
—Ranchers turn out in opposition to governor’s brucellosis management idea. On a six-to-one vote last week, the Montana Board of Livestock halted a plan presented by Gov. Brian Schweitzer to create a split-state status for brucellosis management. The plan would have created a disease management zone around Yellowstone National Park, where elk and bison have transmitted the disease to cattle, while allowing the remainder of the state to claim disease-free status; however, ranchers and Montana Stockgrower’s Association (MSGA) officials said the plan was premature. Following the discovery of an infected herd of cattle in Bridger, MT, in May, officials with USDA’s Animal
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 12, 2007
Darrell Wood of Pete’s Creek Partnership, one of the founding ranches of Panorama Meats, Inc., the Angus grass-fed beef company based in Vina, CA, last week received one of three 2006 National Wetlands Conservation Awards from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Department of the Interior. Wood received the award at a ceremony in Oklahoma City, OK, for his management of the Pete’s Creek Wetland and Riparian Restoration Project on 1,262 acres of the partnership’s ranch located in Lassen County just north of Susanville, CA. This land was also certified as organic grazing land for Panorama Grass-Fed Beef cattle
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 12, 2007
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has proposed removing the Preble’s meadow jumping mouse from Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection in Wyoming but continuing protection for the mouse in Colorado as a threatened subspecies. The new plan would replace a 2005 proposal to delist the mouse across its entire range. Earlier this year, FWS Director Dale Hall ordered the review of eight endangered species—including the Preble’s mouse—decisions involving former deputy assistant secretary Julie MacDonald. Those decisions included the 2005 proposal to lift protection for the Preble’s mouse. The ruling came after MacDonald resigned following criticism by the department’s inspector general
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 12, 2007
Fall is well underway and winter has even begun for producers in most northern areas of the U.S., but as light frosts persist in more southerly areas, ranchers should maintain caution and be wary of placing cattle on sorghum-type feed. Grain sorghum and Sudan grasses are prone to accumulate prussic acid when stressed, such as during periods of drought or freezing temperatures. Even a series of light frosts is not enough to totally kill a sorghum plant, which may continue to make attempts at regrowth until well after a killing freeze. This time before a killing freeze should concern cattlemen the
Cattle Market & Farm Reports, Editorials
by WLJ
Nov 12, 2007
As expected, R-CALF United Stockgrower’s of America filed for a preliminary injunction to prevent trade in over-30-month (OTM) cattle last week. Along with 10 co-plaintiffs, the group submitted a 27-page brief to the U.S. District Court, District of South Dakota Northern Division, in an effort to buy time for their lawsuit and efforts in Congress to prevent USDA from opening the border to expanded beef trade. USDA published the regulation known as Rule 2 in mid-September and set Nov. 19 as the day trade would be allowed to resume for live cattle born after March 1, 1999, and beef from animals


Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar
 

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!