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Livestock News

by WLJ
2008 May 23
Moisture therapy Nothing livens up a branding more than a good rain soaker. When moisture arrived before our branding, my family was excited and optimistic, even though it threw a wrench into our branding day. The large amounts of moisture we got recently made branding a challenge, but nobody complained about it or the mud it produced. It’s been the kind of therapy everybody’s mood needed. We took a chance and went ahead with branding on the day we had planned, even though a lot of rain fell the day before and more was predicted. That morning, my son informed me, "Just be
by WLJ
2008 May 23
JBS: So. America takes backseat to U.S. Brazilian-based multinational beef company, JBS SA, said its operations in Brazil and Argentina are taking a back seat to the U.S. and Australia these days as livestock prices converge with those is South America. JBS Chief Executive Officer Joesley Mendonca Batista told equity analysts during a conference call that profit margins were better in the U.S. than they are in Brazil, the world’s leading beef exporting nation. Low cost advantages are a thing of the past for Brazil, as cattle prices rise thanks to a tightening of the supply and demand equation. Moreover, a
2008 May 23
Cow size—How much more does the big cow eat? The green forage tends to be seasonal, while the grazing of seeds and dry grass is the non-growing season staple. Regardless of the season, a cow’s nutritional requirements need to be met. The challenge is making sure our production expectations are in tune with what Mother Nature provides. Our pastures and feed piles may be limited as we struggle to balance feed and cattle. When seasons are as now, the lack of rain (or other environmental restraint) highlights the need to plan. The quick and easy answer is to sell cattle. However, the astute
by WLJ
2008 May 23
Several Montana agricultural and sportsman associations have moved to intervene in a federal lawsuit recently filed by environmental groups to block wolf delisting. Intervenors include the Montana Shooting Sports Association (MSSA), the Montana Stockgrowers Association (MSGA), the Friends of the Northern Yellowstone Elk Herd, the Western Montana Fish and Game Association, and the Montana Farm Bureau Federation and are seeking to ensure wolf delisting continues. If delisting stalls, it will cause irreparable harm to the Montana hunting and agricultural communities. "Every wolf pack that has come into contact with livestock has resulted in depredations. These losses have had a dramatic impact
by WLJ
2008 May 23
Predators can affect how livestock watch over their young Livestock are likely to spend more time on the lookout for predators soon after the loss of a calf and, therefore, have less time to forage for their food, according to a new study. Consequently, predators such as wolves, mountain lions, and coyotes can affect the economic solvency of livestock producers, according to an article in the May 2008 issue of Rangeland Ecology and Management published by the Society for Range Management. "Our results show that vigilance behavior in cattle is plastic," write Bryan M. Kluever, Stewart W. Breck, Larry D. Howery, Paul
by WLJ
2008 May 23
Find bad udders now One criteria that should be examined to cull cows is udder quality. Bad udders should be culled. Spring calving cows are in the peak of lactation. This is an excellent time to note in the cow record book any cow that has an unsound udder. Cows that have obviously poor udders could be marked for the cull list and removed from the herd next fall when the calves are weaned. Beef cattle producers are not as likely to think about udder health and shape as are dairy producers, but this attribute affects cow productivity and should be
by WLJ
2008 May 23
Texas agriculture production sets record at $21.8 billion Texas agricultural production for 2007 was a record $21.8 billion due to higher crop and livestock prices, according to a Texas AgriLife Extension Service report. Add another $20.8 billion worth of purchased items, such as tires, fuel and other agribusiness supplies used to produce a crop, and the total economic impact to rural Texas tops $42.6 billion, said Dr. Carl Anderson, professor emeritus and AgriLife Extension economist. "The economic impact to these rural communities is quite substantial, and even more so when you look at how much of an economic driver agriculture overall is to
by WLJ
2008 May 23
Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo awards $4.86 million in scholarships In Reliant Stadium, Houston-area youth’s stars shone bright as the real stars of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo (HLSR). Students were honored for their academic and community achievements with a scholarship presentation totaling $4.86 million on Tuesday, May 20, 2008. A four-year, $15,000 scholarship from one of three show scholarship programs—Metropolitan, Opportunity and School Art—was awarded to each of the 324 high school seniors to attend a Texas college or university. The Metropolitan, Opportunity and School Art scholarships are just part of HLSR’s $15.6 million annual commitment to scholarships, research, endowments, calf
by WLJ
2008 May 23
Tips for developing replacement females To run an efficient and progressive beef cow production system, it is important to effectively develop replacement females. Developing a sufficient number of heifers that are cycling at the beginning of the breeding season helps to assure they will breed early in the first year. Early breeding translates to earlier calving and heavier weaning weights. "Because replacement females will not begin to produce an economic return until they are around 3 years old, when they wean their first calves, they are an expensive enterprise," says Glenn Rogers, DVM, Pfizer Animal Health. "Heifers are in danger of failing
by WLJ
2008 May 23
New Holland introduces new bidirectional tractor New Holland’s new TV6070 Bidirectional tractor offers visibility and versatility that no other tractor in the market can offer. The TV6070 features a new 6.7L engine, a more efficient eight-range transmission, and other improvements designed to enhance the productivity of this unique tractor. Like its predecessors, the new TV6070 Bidirectional tractor can be operated cab-end or engine-end first to provide unparalleled versatility, productivity and exceptional loader performance. An operator can work facing either the engine or the rear because the exclusive Turnabout console rotates the seat and primary controls 180 degrees so the operator always faces
by WLJ
2008 April 4
Fortifying feed with biodiesel co-products Biofuel research isn’t just a matter of finding the right type of biomass—corn grain, soybean oil, animal fat, wood or other material—and converting it into fuel. Scientists must also find environmentally and economically sound uses for the by-products of biofuel production. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists Brian Kerr and William Dozier have done just that. Current biodiesel supplies are often made from the triglycerides, or fat, found in soybean oil. But processing biodiesel from soybean oil also yields crude glycerin, also known as glycerol, which has a purity level of about 85 percent. It also contains small
by WLJ
2008 February 12
Economics of packing nother beef slaughter plant bit the dust last week when Tyson Foods announced they were going to close the slaughter operations at their Emporia, KS, plant. They will eliminate 1,500 to 2,400 jobs in the area, which I doubt can afford to lose those jobs, just as feeders in the area can’t afford to loose that plant. Tyson said they will use the plant for cold storage, distribution, and hamburger processing, while keeping some of the fabrication portion of the plant to produce beef cuts which have a tendency to slow down the processing line. Only time will tell
by WLJ
2008 February 5
JAMISON HEREFORD FEMALE AND QUARTER HORSE PRODUCTION SALE Oct. 4, Quinter, KS 13 Fall pairs $2,277 55 Bred heifers 1,738 37 Broke geldings 5,149 30 2007 foals 1,747 14 Prospect saddlemares 2,143 4 Brood mares 1,050 85 Lots 3,255  Auctioneers: Lynn and Seth Weishaar Sale Manager: United Livestock Brokers
by WLJ
2007 December 20
It seems hardly possible the National Western Stock Show made it to 100 years. Most every major stock show has closed down or are so far down in entries they are contemplating closing down. Just a handful remain. The National Western, however, is as big as it has ever been. Cattle numbers are at an all time high and most major breeds are holding their national show in Denver, CO, this year to celebrate the centennial. There will be over 380 pens of cattle shown in the yards, without question the largest number of cattle ever shown. A special recognition will
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Trade last week was typically slow as it tends to be during the lull between the holidays. As of Thursday last week, there was little to report in the area of fed cattle trade. Packers were still low on their bids as feedlots held out for at least steady money. Weather was of little impact, which is a welcome change for feedlots after some very cold temperatures stressed cattle and increased cost of gains across much of the cattle feeding area. However, those same feedlots that were frozen and snow-covered are dealing with mud, which was reportedly a major factor
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Cow/calf producers had a lot to celebrate this holiday season. Apart from coming into the winter with more ample forage supplies than for some years, they had just completed their second best year ever in returns per cow. That’s after record returns in 2004. Conversely, cattle feeders had a breakeven year at best and probably lost $25 to $30 per head. And packers had one of their worst years in recent history, after 2004 losses that were among the largest in history. All this meant that cow/calf operators captured a greater percentage of the consumer beef dollar than they have for
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Prior to the release of the report, analysts had predicted 3 to 4 percent more cattle on feed, 14 to15 percent higher placement numbers and 3 to 4 percent higher fed cattle marketings. The industry was expecting heavy placements and analysts were right on target, although the report actually came in slightly higher than expected. According to Andy Gottschalk at HedgersEdge.com, “The largest increase in placements occurred in the south Plains, as wheat pasture is virtually non-existent. Those states reporting placements up 19 percent or more were Iowa up 20 percent, Kansas up 20 percent, New Mexico up 29 percent, Oklahoma
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Producers rely on consumers to set the trends and keep their livelihoods financially secure. However, consumers frequently get their information from the media, which oftentimes tends to focus on disasters, such as hoof-and-mouth disease and avian influenza. In addition, information can be skewed in an effort to promote a certain brand of beef, often claiming to be the best. Restaurant owner, chef Victor Matthews Jr., was tired of hearing “this beef is the best” from domestic and international markets, including the 56 USDA approved branded beef programs, as well as the 65 brands not approved by the USDA. His curiosity,
by WLJ
2007 December 20
According to Cattle Fax, the largest 9 percent of cow/calf producers generated 51 percent of weaned calves, while the top 2 percent of feedlot operators produced 85 percent of finished steers and heifers last year. Cattle Fax also reported that the top five packing companies, the top ten supermarket chains, the top ten food service distributors and the top ten restaurants have market shares of 78, 55, 45 and 30 percent, respectively, of beef or food sales. Gary Smith of the animal science department at Colorado State University said the top seven supermarkets controlled 65 percent of food sales in
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Buyers who have been looking at ranch property in states such as Montana, Wyoming and Idaho, ought to look to the southwest U.S. That’s the message being spread by realtors in the states of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona. According to real estate professionals across the southwest region, buyers can still find incredible value for their money in properties throughout the area. New Mexico realtor, Scott McNally, of Bar M Real Estate said property values in the region are being driven by two things. The first is a growing number of 1031 tax deferred exchanges. McNally said between 30 and


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