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Livestock News

by WLJ
2008 August 8
Rodeos, Olympic equestrian sports, skateboarding, car racing, golf, tennis and other sports have several things in common: Winning in these sports can bring lucrative prizes, scholarships, and advertising endorsement contracts. Some children show great promise in sports, such as Tiger Woods did in golf. Parents understandably want to help develop the sporting skills of talented children. This means funding and managing their child’s aspiring career as an athlete in one field or another. Because so many youngsters are eager to compete for money in their favorite sport, parents often take on the role of manager of the activity. This involves funding
by WLJ
2008 August 8
It’s hard to know what to believe any more. Show me a study that reaches one conclusion, and I’ll come up with three more that find opposite results. That seems to be the way our society runs these days. There’s something for everyone, but there is no conclusive proof that we can all agree upon. It makes it hard to believe in anything, and solving problems is very difficult, to say the least. There were several prime examples last week that can and do impact the beef industry directly. Global warming, or the lack thereof, may be one of the most
by WLJ
2008 August 8
Coming Events Aug. 15 Aug. 27 Aug. 27 Sept. 17-19 Sept. 19 Oct. TBD Oct. 2 Oct. 7-9 Oct. 23-29 Nov. 2-4 Nov. 6-8 November 19-21 Dec. 3-4 Dec. 7-10 2009 Jan. 28-31 March 8-10 - Annual Meat Conference, Sheraton Denver Hotel, Denver, CO. - National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Annual Convention, Phoenix, AZ. For more information, call 303/694-0305. - Wyoming Stockgrower’s Association Joint Winter Convention, Parkway Plaza, Casper, WY. For more information, contact WYSGA at 307/638-3942 or email info@wysga.org. - Kansas Livestock Association Convention and Trade Show, Wichita, KS. For more information or to register, contact KLA at 785/273-5115. - California Cattlewomen’s/California Cattlemen’s Association Convention, John Ascuaga’s Nugget, Sparks, NV. For more information or to register, call
by WLJ
2008 August 8
Experts doubt meat/cancer link A panel of government, university and industry experts speaking at a leading food safety conference last week cast serious doubt on widely reported claims of a meat and cancer connection. David Klurfeld, Ph.D., national program leader in human nutrition at USDA, provided an extensive critique of the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) report which made dramatic claims about a "convincing link" between red and processed meat and colorectal cancer. According to Klurfeld, the systematic literature review said that, "Overall, mechanisms explaining the data linking meat intake and colorectal cancer are far from plausible biological mechanisms." He
by WLJ
2008 August 8
A good jump in the futures trade lent some support to fed cattle markets last week and was expected to push cash prices higher. Although there was only minimal trade at mid-day last Thursday, analysts were calling the market $1-2 higher at $99-100 live and $158-160 dressed basis when trade finally got started, although the bulk of the action looked to be a Friday affair. Boxed beef prices also continued to support the live trade with Choice cutout values rising at midweek on fair movement in the retail trade and very good export shipments. South Korea has jumped into the market
by WLJ
2008 August 8
Following a legal challenge and much pressure from ranchers and their advocates, USDA Secretary Ed Schafer announced Aug. 1 that drought stricken areas would receive some relief in the form of access to Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acreage. In counties particularly hard hit by drought this summer, USDA will allow emergency haying and grazing in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, North Dakota, Montana and Texas in exchange for a 10 percent reduction in rental payments rather than the normal 25 percent. To be approved for emergency haying or grazing, a county must be listed as a level "D3 Drought -Extreme" or greater, or
by WLJ
2008 August 1
AVMA passes animal welfare policies The American Veterinary Medical Association House of Delegates (AVMA-HOD) voted July 21 to pass a groundbreaking policy on veal calf housing that promotes both animal health and welfare. The resolution passed by a landslide 88.7 percent vote. This new policy states "the AVMA supports a change in veal husbandry practices that severely restrict movement, to housing systems that allow for greater freedom of movement without compromising health or welfare." "This is encouraging on two levels," explains Ron DeHaven, AVMA chief executive officer. "First, we are proactively seeking to improve the welfare of veal calves, and second, the resolution
by WLJ
2008 August 1
—Price turn-around appears near as supplies begin to tighten. The beef cutout last week appeared to have hit a floor and the warm weather forecast for the weekend added to some of the optimism that cash prices might begin to bounce as wholesale meat buyers began preparing for the Labor Day buying season. Despite that turn-around in the beef complex, cash prices were expected no better than steady with the previous week when serious trade finally got started last week. Most market analysts were calling the fed cattle trade steady to lower for the week in a range of $93-94 live
by WLJ
2008 August 1
U.S. cattle on feed numbers fell during June as the market works toward its seasonal low. Cattle on feed in yards of 1,000 head or more were down 4.1 percent as of July 1, dropping to 10.3 million head. The figure was 5 percent below July 1, 2006. The inventory included 6.43 million steers and steer calves, down 5 percent from the previous year. This group accounted for 62 percent of the total inventory. Heifers and heifer calves accounted for 3.82 million head, down 3 percent from 2007. The decline is indicative of a possible upswing in the number of
by WLJ
2008 August 1
USDA releases interim COOL regulations The long awaited text of the new Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) rules arrived last week and has producers, feeders, packers and retailers scrambling to understand the full scope of the program. The newly-drafted set of rules, called an ‘interim final rule,’ was set to be published in the Federal Register on Aug. 1, though USDA released the full text of the rule early to give industry representatives a head start on determining their compliance requirements. After a 60-day comment period to allow for some adjustments, USDA will publish the final rules and implement the program on
by WLJ
2008 August 1
An effective vaccine against a parasite-borne disease called neosporosis may be a few steps closer to development thanks to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators. Neosporosis, caused by the parasite Neospora caninum, affects cattle worldwide. Infected animals often abort their calves and develop other debilitating complications that can cost producers millions of dollars every year. Animal scientist Wenbin Tuo and microbiologist Mark Jenkins work at the ARS Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory in Beltsville, MD. They collaborated with ARS Molecular Plant Pathology Laboratory molecular biologist Yan Zhao and National Institutes of Health researcher Daming Zhu to test a new neosporosis vaccine in
by WLJ
2008 August 1
To start a lively discussion amongst a group of cattlemen, just utter the word "marbling." It’s been called one of the most emotive words in the beef industry. From those who dismiss it as unimportant to the staunch defenders, opinions will vary. A presentation at the American Society of Animal Science annual meeting earlier this month focused on the science behind the word. Larry Corah, vice president of Certified Angus Beef LLC, shared research related to the value of marbling. "Nearly all beef scientists and connoisseurs indicate that there are three key attributes to beef palatability: tenderness, juiciness and flavor," he said. If
by WLJ
2008 August 1
Two beef producers from Nebraska and Iowa took part in a U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) U.S. Beef Checkoff-sponsored promotion, made possible through the financial support of the Nebraska Beef Council and the Iowa Beef Industry Council, that helped boost weekend sales of U.S. beef tenfold at a key store in Japan’s largest retail grocery chain. U.S. beef producers Bill Rhea of Arlington, NE, the Nebraska Beef Council’s treasurer, and Scott Niess of Osage, IA, and a member of the Iowa Beef Industry Council’s board of directors, witnessed and participated in a large-scale USMEF U.S. beef promotion for Japanese consumers at
by DTN
2008 August 1
USDA will not allow landowners to take acres out of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) early unless the landowner agrees to pay the normal early-out penalties for breaking a contract, Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer said last Tuesday. Schafer said the decision not to allow early out "strikes the best possible balance between supporting programs that protect our natural resources and meeting the nation’s need for grain production." The decision effectively means farmers wanting to void a CRP contract for 2009 crops would have to pay the USDA penalties to do so. In choosing to stand pat on CRP, Schafer said USDA completed
by WLJ
2008 August 1
  USDA has tried hard to make this country-of-origin labeling (COOL) rule as minimally invasive as possible. While the rule has the same basic intent of identifying country of origin on covered commodities, it has essentially had all its teeth removed from the 2002 legislation. They also had just a couple months to get this interim rule written after passage of the Farm Bill, which was holding up the entire process. Producers, on the surface, have very little to be concerned about. Your good word is your bond that the cattle are what you say they are. Liability for accurate origin information
by WLJ
2008 August 1
More than 2,300 farmers and ranchers will receive checks in the mail soon for capturing and storing carbon dioxide in their soil through the National Farmers Union Carbon Credit Program. National Farmers Union (NFU) President Tom Buis said total earnings from no-till and seeded grassland offsets generated $5,876,825 in income for 2006 and 2007 practices. To date, $8 million has been earned by producers since the voluntary program began in late 2006. "As conservation leaders, we know agriculture can play an important part in offsetting greenhouse gases in our environment today," Buis said. "Now, through innovative soil stewardship activities and the carbon
by WLJ
2008 August 1
Genotyping results of the Brucella abortus bacteria found to have been infecting a cow near Pray, MT, has pointed to elk as the most likely source of the disease. The cow, found in the Paradise Valley area north of Yellowstone National Park in June, was out of the area where it was considered likely for bison to have transmitted the disease, but well within the area where brucellosis-carrying elk frequent. Montana’s most recent finding came just one year after a positive test for brucellosis was discovered in a cattle herd near Bridger, MT, which resulted in the depopulation of two herds
by WLJ
2008 August 1
Consumers with chef envy take heart Few consumers can afford private cooking lessons from a renowned chef—until now. The Certified Angus Beef (CAB) brand has made beef preparation simple with new cooking videos available at www.certifiedangusbeef.com. Scott Popovic, CAB LLC corporate chef, shares his secrets to success in several online demonstrations detailing everything from braising to sautéing to grilling to carving a bone-in ribeye. The company’s home economist, Sarah Donohoe, is also featured in several segments. "Consumers are making an investment every time they head to the grocery store," says Popovic. "Shoppers have confidence in the superior quality of the Certified


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