Search: in Authors List
 

All Articles

by WLJ
2007 December 20
November 27, 2006 The yellow flag is up I suppose the good thing about corn prices going through the roof, other than corn farmers making a few bucks, is that carcass weights should start to drop and start reducing some of the beef volume. Corn was at $3.80 on the cash market last week. Some market analysts are thinking that December corn has already plugged in all the negative news and should stabilize, barring greater end stock usage and lower production data. The cattle on feed report that came out last week showed us there are plenty of cattle in feed yards
by WLJ
2007 December 20
December 3, 2006 Sorting cattle helps eliminate outliers in a pen, but the extra effort may be rewarded by higher quality grades, too. A study by Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) shows the more sorts, the better the grades in most cases. “Our data says those cattle that were sorted three or more times have much higher CAB acceptance rates than cattle that were just sold as one group,” says Gary Fike, beef cattle specialist for the company. From 2005 to 2006, CAB tracked data from its 63 licensed feedlots in 15 states. Cattle that were marketed together had an average CAB acceptance
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The CCA convention had a little something for everyone, including two major fundraising functions. The kick-off function was a dinner and auction for the Livestock Memorial Research Fund (LMRF) and Protecting Our State’s Stewards, Economy and Environment (POSSEE) committees in which over $20,000 was raised. The Allied Industries Council hosted a wine and cheese social in addition to a bingo night on Thursday, Nov 16. Proceeds from this function went toward the Allied Industries Council Scholarship Program which, last year, paid out over $11,000 to California college students. Pfizer Animal Health once again hosted three Cattlemen’s College seminars. All three
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Bill Rawlings of Boise is the 2006 Cattlefeeder of the Year. He has been part of the Idaho cattle feeding industry for over 30 years, and a key part of one of the state’s largest feeders for over 27 years. A key member of the management team at Agri Beef Co., based in Boise, Rawlings has proved to be a stable voice of reason throughout the many changes in the Idaho feeding industry over the years. He has helped build one of the most dynamic and progressive companies in the industry, and has brought core values to his work—integrity, innovation,
by WLJ
2007 December 20
“Cattlemen participated in discussions and listened to educational sessions which impact their ranching operations. It was obvious due diligence will be required in the upcoming year to make certain ranching is not left out of the decisions being made; ensuring ranching remains a vital and profit-able business,” commented Rachel Buzzetti, executive director of the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association (NCA). The Cattlemen’s College was overwhelmingly attended and the first topic of the day included a panel of experts who talked about wildfire prevention and suppression. The panelists included moderator John McLain of Resource Concepts; University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) Range Specialist Emeritus Wayne
by WLJ
2007 December 20
North Dakota Sens. Kent Conrad and Byron Dorgan, both Democrats, pressured Republican leadership to take up the legislation the week of Nov. 13. But the senators’ amendment, which would have provided about $4.5 billion for farmers affected by weather-related losses, was blocked as fiscal conservatives complained about the cost. The senators will try again the week of Dec. 4, when Congress returns for one week before the end of the year. If they are successful, the legislation will be added to an agriculture spending bill that would be considered by House and Senate negotiators after Democrats take control of Congress
2007 December 20
The most recent addition to the lineup gets the nod. We all know that in a matter of days, the most recent becomes old. You now can do about anything you want with that small device in the palm of your hand. You can take a small stick device and manipulate the keypad in a way that the world knows who you are, where you are, and what you need. This is common among the new generation. The older generation is quickly getting acclimated. Therein is a great opportunity: new jobs and new expectations. In the beef world, the beef techie soon
by WLJ
2007 December 20
A version of this policy was in effect for the 2007 State Fair when controversy erupted as a result of the premises registration requirement. Youths who were attempting to show their livestock were barred from doing so unless their parents agreed to register their premises. Two entrants did not comply, which resulted in their removal from the fairgrounds. They were later compensated for the market price of their animals and travel expenses after signing an agreement removing the fair from liability. The debate continued to swirl long after the incident occurred, in an argument which pitted Colorado state officials against concerned citizens
by WLJ
2007 December 20
I’m not sure why I got the letter of rebuttal about National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President John Queen and WLJ’s John Robinson’s comments regarding the negative effects of the Captive Supply Reform Act. The measure is being pushed by five north-central state senators who are attempting to reform the Packers and Stockyards Act through the upcoming farm bill, which may not pass this year. Needless to say, neither of the aforementioned writers support the amendments in any way. Since the rebuttal, printed on page 3 of this week’s edition, from one of R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America’s regional directors was addressed
by WLJ
2007 December 20
December 10, 2007 Some light cash trade was underway by mid-day last Thursday at $145-147 in Nebraska, however most other areas were quiet, with the majority of trade expected to occur on Friday. Analysts expected a steady to weak trend last week. Prior week trade came in at $95-95.50 in the southern Plains. Live sales in Nebraska and Colorado sold from $95-96 and dressed sales ranged from $150-151. Live sales in Iowa/Minnesota sold from $94-95 with dressed sales from $148-150. Packers werte working off available supplies of contract and formula cattle and slaughter volume early in the week was indicative of
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Wesinger owned a lucrative computer servicing business in San Jose, CA. He purchased two parcels of unimproved land and started a cattle ranch. He had some experience helping out occasionally on two dairy farms near where he grew up. He did not seek any professional assistance, at the time he purchased the ranch, as to its suitability for cattle ranching. He had no formal business plan detailing how a profit was to be made from the ranching operations. His plan was to buy, raise and sell cows.  However, he learned that the grasses on the land would not support the cattle. He
by WLJ
2007 December 20
December 10, 2007 R-CALF's rebuttal to Robinson, Queen Dear Editor: This letter is a rebuttal to both John Robinson’s column and John Queen’s letter, which appeared in the Nov. 19 edition and illustrate that the Captive Supply Reform Act has been grossly misrepresented. One wonders whether many who write and speak of it have actually read it or intentionally misrepresent it. First, a brief review of the process at issue. Forward contracts are agreements to sell cattle at a future point in time, often for a two-week period but sometimes longer, and usually with the ability of the packer to call for the cattle
by WLJ
2007 December 20
December 10, 2007 Ethanol plants and livestock producers have created a symbiotic relationship. Cattle producers feed their livestock distillers grains, a byproduct of the ethanol distilling process, giving ethanol producers an added source of income. But recent research at Kansas State University (K-State) has found that cattle fed distillers grain have an increased prevalence of E. coli 0157 in their hindgut. This particular type of E. coli is present in healthy cattle but poses a health risk to humans, who can acquire it through undercooked meat, raw dairy products and produce contaminated with cattle manure. “Distillers grain is a good animal feed. That’s
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The Senate voted 77-18 to pass the agreement, which was revamped earlier this year to include groundbreaking labor and environmental provisions. The House voted 285-132 for the agreement last month. The deal locks in Peru’s duty-free access to the U.S. market under a longstanding U.S. trade-preference program, creating a more favorable environment for foreign investment in Peru. The U.S. Grains Council (USGC) estimated that the agreement would increase U.S. exports of agricultural products to Peru by more than $700 million once the measure is fully implemented. “Upon full implementation, all U.S. agricultural exports, including barley, corn, sorghum and distillers dried
by WLJ
2007 December 10
A federal judge recently ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) failed to take into account the best scientific evidence available when it decided not to give sage grouse endangered species protection. U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill chastised the agency in his decision, which placed a large amount of blame on former Deputy Assistant Interior Secretary Julie MacDonald. MacDonald, who resigned in May, has been accused by Winmill of intimidating FWS personnel, editing scientific data, and purposefully blocking potential listings of a number of critical species, including sage grouse. “Furthermore, the FWS decision lacked a coherent analysis of the
by WLJ
2007 December 10
The weather outlook for much of the southern U.S. isn’t likely to change much over the course of the next three months. Below normal precipitation and above normal temperatures are expected to remain in control for most of the winter months, according to National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts. That could spell bad news for the winter wheat crop and producers who, in some areas, have been suffering from drought conditions for more than a year. David Miskus, agriculture weather meteorologist for the National Centers for Climate Prediction, said last week that a moderate La Niña will continue to influence U.S.
by WLJ
2007 December 10
At a press conference Nov. 30, USDA Undersecretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Bruce Knight and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) CEO Terry Stokes announced the two organizations had finalized a $2.1 million agreement to encourage beef producers’ voluntary participation in the National Animal Identification System (NAIS). Citing lower than expected premises registration among cattle producers, Knight said the agreement would help promote the program among the producers using NCBA’s extensive media outlets and partnerships with state cattlemen’s associations. “This cooperative agreement will help USDA reach out to the large and varied American cattle industry to promote the merits of a
by WLJ
2007 December 4
Markets Good Quality Pays The purebred cattle markets have been quite good this fall, with very little moisture and high hay prices it would normally have everyone’s caution flag up. But bull and female sales have been great, some outfits have had the best sales ever. This last week Stevenson Basin Angus in Hobson, MT. grossed 6.5 million on their three day event. There have been thousands of Registered Angus females on the market this fall enough that one might think it would be to hard for the market to absorb, but it did. Registered Angus females have been bringing the big money
by WLJ
2007 December 3
The next generation A lot of people say they like farm and ranch living because it is a great environment for raising children. They learn about nature, responsibility and consequences. Make sure they also learn about the business. As the youngest animals in your herd have the most potential for excellence, the next generation of producers has much more. There are even some ideas common to growth and development of both species. You want to give them every opportunity to succeed, but don’t spoil them, and make them sure they can function in the real-world economic environment. Don’t lose track of
by WLJ
2007 December 3
Market’s good, quality pays   The purebred cattle markets have been quite good this fall. With very little moisture and high hay prices, it would normally have everyone’s caution flag up. But bull and female sales have been great; some outfits have had the best sales ever. Last week, Stevenson Basin Angus in Hobson, MT, grossed $6.5 million on their three-day event. There have been thousands of registered Angus females on the market this fall, enough that one might think it would be too hard for the market to absorb, but it did. Registered Angus females have been bringing the big money


Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar