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by WLJ
2007 December 20
October 30, 2006 SCA schedules calf contest The 25th annual Sandhills Cattle Association Educational, Performance and Carcass Contest will be held Wednesday, Nov. 8. The cattle will be fed at Ainsworth Feed Yard, Ainsworth, NE, the feedlot where the contest was first held. A pen of steers and a pen of heifers will be fed. Participants may enter any number of calves but they should be weaned, have received pre-conditioning shots, and not be implanted. Contestants retain ownership of the cattle. Expenses are deducted at the end of the contest. For more information, contact the Sandhills Cattle Association at 800/658-0551 or 402/376-2310. Colorado
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Last Monday, USDA reported delays in corn and/or soybean harvest across nearly a dozen major producing states including Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, and Wisconsin. “Rain and wet fields are making corn harvest difficult in the Ohio Valley and perhaps will reduce final yields in some of those states. The USDA lowered estimated national corn yield in its October report and may lower it again in its November report. At least, that is the buzz in the trade,” said Kansas State University Extension Grain Economist Mike Woolverton. Picking is approximately seven to 10 days behind
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Fed cattle trade broke out earlier than normal last week. Trade and demand was moderate in the Texas Panhandle last Wednesday afternoon and Thursday. Compared to the prior week, live sales were .50 to $1 lower at $89-89.50. Trade was very limited in Kansas with a few early live sales at $89-89.50 and dressed sales at $141. Trading was moderate in central and western Nebraska with live sales mostly steady with last week at $89-89.50. There was also reportedly a light test of dressed sales at $138 in Nebraska. Trade in Colorado was also light with early live sales unevenly
by WLJ
2007 December 20
November 12, 2007 Fed cattle trade stalled last week as packers and feedlots battled back and forth to determine who would end up taking bigger losses on this week’s trade. There was little change in the market picture last week to alleviate the squeeze on either side of the equation despite packers’ cutback in harvest levels, which served only to prevent boxed beef prices from falling farther. As of mid-day last Thursday, packers and feeders were still several dollars apart and market analysts expected the week’s trade at steady money. The previous week’s trade in the southern Plains came at $92-93.50.
by WLJ
2007 December 20
As most analysts expected, USDA lowered its forecast for the 2006 corn harvest last week. According to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), this year’s harvest will average 151.2 bushels per acre for a total expected harvest of 10.745 billion bushels. That number is 1 percent lower than forecast last month and 3 percent lower than 2005’s harvest. Drought had significant effects on the expected yield this year, with much of the northern Plains and western Corn Belt reporting yields significantly lower than previous years. Along the eastern edge of the Corn Belt, too much moisture during harvest has also
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Both the House and Senate agriculture committees will have new leaders going into the upcoming Farm Bill debate, however, according to Mark Maslyn, executive director of public policy for the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF), the committee’s history of bipartisan cooperation will not be affected by the results of the election. “The issues affecting agriculture are the same today as they were two days ago. The major challenge is going to be maintaining the baseline in the committee,” said Maslyn. “We expect that there will be a strong advocacy for the Farm Bill from Chairman Collin Peterson (D-MN).” Maslyn said he
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The Japanese Agriculture and Health Ministry announced it would halt shipments from Swift because a shipment from the facility arrived in Osaka on Oct. 30 without proper paperwork. The incident involves a single box of meat within a 760 box, 11 ton shipment of beef and tongues, Ministry official Yasushi Yamaguchi said. “For the time being, we will not allow beef from the facility to enter the Japanese market,” Yamaguchi said during a press conference. Some Japanese government officials have said all imports should be halted if banned material was again found in a U.S. beef shipment, however, at present, Yamaguchi
by WLJ
2007 December 20
In recent years, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has ruled that a written business plan is important evidence tending to prove that you are operating in a businesslike manner. The U.S. Tax Court has said that in hobby loss cases, you should have “some type of plan” for the venture. This applies whether you are involved in livestock breeding or traditional agricultural farming, as well as other areas such as classic car refurbishing, antique collecting, dog breeding, boat or aircraft chartering, and other areas traditionally under IRS scrutiny. The IRS takes the view that a written business plan demonstrates your businesslike
by WLJ
2007 December 20
November 26, 2007 Colorado Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) held their 57th annual Mid-Winter Conference Nov. 14-16 at the DoubleTree Hotel in Colorado Springs, CO. With record attendance, CCA members and guests were able to come together on key issues affecting the beef industry. “We are a community of beef producers and Colorado residents dedicated to this industry and doing what is right,” said Kenny Rogers, CCA president. Representatives from across the state attended this annual event, sponsored by CCA and the Colorado CattleWomen (CCW), to share their commitment to improving Colorado’s beef industry. “As we move into the next legislative session, Colorado beef
by WLJ
2007 December 20
November 26, 2007 The rally in the boxed beef market last week of more than $4 was expected to help cattle feeders move prices higher. Analysts were calling for trade in the range of $147-$148 dressed basis in the north and $94 and higher in the south. The cutout values, which reached $148.06 on the Choice and $135.07 for Select last Wednesday, have helped boost packer margins closer to breakeven and a holiday-shortened harvest last week, along with a surge in demand for beef, drove beef prices to their highest point since early September. Although trade had yet to develop in
by WLJ
2007 December 20
November 26, 2007 A new study conducted under feedlot conditions demonstrates that, despite improvements made in the quality of commercial vaccines against the bacterium Mannheimia haemolytica, those that don’t include a component to specifically stimulate protection against leukotoxin risk failure. Leukotoxin is a natural byproduct produced by infection with M. haemolytica. Believed to be only one of the pathogenic factors M. haemolytica produces—but the most important—leukotoxin destroys the calf’s white blood cells, preventing them from fighting the infection and the damaging inflammatory process in the lung. Adequate protection against the effects of leukotoxin is so important, for instance, that mutant M. haemolytica
by WLJ
2007 December 20
November 27, 2006 The yellow flag is up I suppose the good thing about corn prices going through the roof, other than corn farmers making a few bucks, is that carcass weights should start to drop and start reducing some of the beef volume. Corn was at $3.80 on the cash market last week. Some market analysts are thinking that December corn has already plugged in all the negative news and should stabilize, barring greater end stock usage and lower production data. The cattle on feed report that came out last week showed us there are plenty of cattle in feed yards
by WLJ
2007 December 20
December 3, 2006 Sorting cattle helps eliminate outliers in a pen, but the extra effort may be rewarded by higher quality grades, too. A study by Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) shows the more sorts, the better the grades in most cases. “Our data says those cattle that were sorted three or more times have much higher CAB acceptance rates than cattle that were just sold as one group,” says Gary Fike, beef cattle specialist for the company. From 2005 to 2006, CAB tracked data from its 63 licensed feedlots in 15 states. Cattle that were marketed together had an average CAB acceptance
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The CCA convention had a little something for everyone, including two major fundraising functions. The kick-off function was a dinner and auction for the Livestock Memorial Research Fund (LMRF) and Protecting Our State’s Stewards, Economy and Environment (POSSEE) committees in which over $20,000 was raised. The Allied Industries Council hosted a wine and cheese social in addition to a bingo night on Thursday, Nov 16. Proceeds from this function went toward the Allied Industries Council Scholarship Program which, last year, paid out over $11,000 to California college students. Pfizer Animal Health once again hosted three Cattlemen’s College seminars. All three
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Bill Rawlings of Boise is the 2006 Cattlefeeder of the Year. He has been part of the Idaho cattle feeding industry for over 30 years, and a key part of one of the state’s largest feeders for over 27 years. A key member of the management team at Agri Beef Co., based in Boise, Rawlings has proved to be a stable voice of reason throughout the many changes in the Idaho feeding industry over the years. He has helped build one of the most dynamic and progressive companies in the industry, and has brought core values to his work—integrity, innovation,
by WLJ
2007 December 20
“Cattlemen participated in discussions and listened to educational sessions which impact their ranching operations. It was obvious due diligence will be required in the upcoming year to make certain ranching is not left out of the decisions being made; ensuring ranching remains a vital and profit-able business,” commented Rachel Buzzetti, executive director of the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association (NCA). The Cattlemen’s College was overwhelmingly attended and the first topic of the day included a panel of experts who talked about wildfire prevention and suppression. The panelists included moderator John McLain of Resource Concepts; University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) Range Specialist Emeritus Wayne
by WLJ
2007 December 20
North Dakota Sens. Kent Conrad and Byron Dorgan, both Democrats, pressured Republican leadership to take up the legislation the week of Nov. 13. But the senators’ amendment, which would have provided about $4.5 billion for farmers affected by weather-related losses, was blocked as fiscal conservatives complained about the cost. The senators will try again the week of Dec. 4, when Congress returns for one week before the end of the year. If they are successful, the legislation will be added to an agriculture spending bill that would be considered by House and Senate negotiators after Democrats take control of Congress
2007 December 20
The most recent addition to the lineup gets the nod. We all know that in a matter of days, the most recent becomes old. You now can do about anything you want with that small device in the palm of your hand. You can take a small stick device and manipulate the keypad in a way that the world knows who you are, where you are, and what you need. This is common among the new generation. The older generation is quickly getting acclimated. Therein is a great opportunity: new jobs and new expectations. In the beef world, the beef techie soon
by WLJ
2007 December 20
A version of this policy was in effect for the 2007 State Fair when controversy erupted as a result of the premises registration requirement. Youths who were attempting to show their livestock were barred from doing so unless their parents agreed to register their premises. Two entrants did not comply, which resulted in their removal from the fairgrounds. They were later compensated for the market price of their animals and travel expenses after signing an agreement removing the fair from liability. The debate continued to swirl long after the incident occurred, in an argument which pitted Colorado state officials against concerned citizens
by WLJ
2007 December 20
I’m not sure why I got the letter of rebuttal about National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President John Queen and WLJ’s John Robinson’s comments regarding the negative effects of the Captive Supply Reform Act. The measure is being pushed by five north-central state senators who are attempting to reform the Packers and Stockyards Act through the upcoming farm bill, which may not pass this year. Needless to say, neither of the aforementioned writers support the amendments in any way. Since the rebuttal, printed on page 3 of this week’s edition, from one of R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America’s regional directors was addressed