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by WLJ
2005 February 21
U.S. soldiers in Iraq spend hours—sometimes days—on patrol hunting insurgents and dodging roadside bombs. But when they get back to base, they can pick up a case of Dr. Pepper, buy the latest DVD and get a Pizza Hut meal back to the room to relax after a hard day at war. A soldiers life isn’t what it used to be. Commanders say providing a good quality of life is essential to keeping volunteer troops in the military. Having a chance to skip the mess hail and go to Pizza Hut, Burger King or Subway—Popeye’s Fried Chicken and Taco Bell will be
by WLJ
2005 February 21
To increase consumer demand for beef, the cattle industry must boost the amount of flavor the product contains, said Gary Smith of the Center for Red Meat Safety at Colorado State University. Smith made the comment while explaining why people eat beef to a gathering at the annual National Cattlemen's Beef Association convention. He later explained to Dow Jones Newswires that although the industry had focused on tenderness for the last few years, tenderness alone would not win new beef consumers, although it might encourage some who already liked beef to eat a little more. "If tenderness were the issue, they'd eat
by WLJ
2005 February 21
Having recently attended both the R-CALF and the Cattle Industry annual conventions—the latter where NCBA, the CBB, ANCW, Cattle-Fax and National Cattlemen's Foundation meet—I was struck by the contrasts I observed. The obvious first comparison, of course, is sheer size. At the national R-CALF convention, there were never more than 100 cattlemen in the room at any time during the three days. At NCBA-CBB joint sessions, thousands of cattlemen crammed huge theaters and ballrooms. Committee sessions had 25 to 50 people in attendance setting policy. Their joint board of directors' meeting had twice the number of people as R-CALF's "all-in" sessions.
by WLJ
2005 February 21
Korea has yet to even hint if, or when, it will lift its bans in place on both U.S. and Canadian beef. While Japan has moved closer to lifting its ban, sources with USDA said it appears Korean officials are waiting for a full resolution between Japan and Canada and the U.S. before they start the resolution process. Korea did send a technical team to the U.S. last May to review and validate the findings of the International Review Commission concerning the U.S. protocols to prevent bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) from infecting beef in the future. However, a high-level USDA official that
by WLJ
2005 February 21
Re: Cattle Identification Attention: Sarah Swenson: Why do not cattlemen insert “microchip IDs” in the cattle as they do in dogs now? They would not be very easily removed at all—and would surely simplify the procedure as well as decreasing costs! Just was thinking about this after reading the article in WLJ. I am retired now and have sold all our cattle since my husband (Clyde) passed away in 1994. Just always loved the cattle business! Audrey Carner Carner Hat C Ranch (no longer in business) Chino Valley Long-term solutions required Since BSE was discovered in Canada, a tangled web of media hype, international politics, scientific investigation and economic theory have
by WLJ
2005 February 21
After eight years of cyclical decline, cattle numbers finally rebounded in the second half of 2004. The USDA annual cattle inventory report, released Jan. 28, showed an increase in the U.S. cattle herd for the first time since 1996. The report indicated 95.8 million head of cattle were on U.S. farms and ranches on Jan. l, which is 1 percent above the 94.9 million head recorded in 2004. The higher numbers were not a surprise to most cattle market observers because of the much improved moisture conditions in many southern and western cattle producing states. Above average cow-calf returns also fueled herd
by WLJ
2005 February 21
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the Salt Creek tiger beetle as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The only three known populations of the species in the world occur in saline wetlands in eastern Nebraska. The beetles are considered the rarest insect in Nebraska and are already protected under Nebraska State law. If the Salt Creek tiger beetle is listed under the Endangered Species Act, the Service will work cooperatively with partners to conserve habitat, said Ralph Morgenweck, director of the Service's Mountain-Prairie Region. In response to a lawsuit filed by Earthjustice Legal Defense Fund and several
by WLJ
2005 February 21
Edwin J. “Ed” Carter Edwin J. “Ed” Carter, 72, died Feb. 6. He was born in Torrington, WY, Nov. 1, 1932, the son of Bill and Phyllis (Platx) Carter. He grew up in Torrington and graduated from Torrington High School. Following high school he went to work as a ranch hand for various ranchers in the area and lived in Fresno, CA, Sheridan and Lovell, WY. Carter spent four years working for Senator Malcolm Wallop on his ranch near Sheridan. He then began his own business trimming cattle hooves and preparing livestock for stock shows and traveled to Wyoming, Colorado,
by WLJ
2005 February 21
The first new packing house to open in Alberta since BSE was discovered in Canada recently processed their first cattle. After pondering the idea of turning a shuttered chicken processing plant into a beef facility over seven years ago, producers Reita and Stan Sparks, Wanham, Alberta, revisited that plan and moved forward with it after BSE was discovered back in 2003. "It gave us a jolt to try something else," said Stan Sparks, who plans to kill 70 animals a week at Hart Valley Processors near Wanham in the Peace River region of the country. Seven cattle were processed on Feb. 8, the
by WLJ
2005 February 21
— Cow market remains strong. — Calves stronger on weather, feeders struggling. Fed cattle markets were slow to develop last week as little trade was reported through Thursday. A small number of cattle traded between $87-88 live, $138-140 dressed. A pick up in trade was expected Friday. Early trade was $2-4 softer than the majority of market activity the previous week. Slaughter volumes continue to be a problem with just 573,00 head passing through packing plants two weeks ago, 10,000 head lower than the prior week. Packers processed 471,000 head through Thursday of last week, which was the first week that weekly slaughter
by WLJ
2005 February 21
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has concluded its investigation into the latest case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) confirmed on Jan. 11. All animals tested through the investigation were found negative for BSE. The agency's investigation determined that 349 animals comprised the birth cohort, which includes cattle born on the farm of origin within 12 months before and 12 months after the infected animal. Of this group, 41 animals were found alive and were euthanized. They tested negative for BSE. Most of the other animals from the birth cohort had previously died or been slaughtered. The investigation also identified the
by WLJ
2005 February 21
— APHIS action not strong enough. According to a report from USDA’s inspector general last week, several Canadian exporters have permits that enabled them to export bovine cheek meat to the U.S., even though it’s a prohibited product under USDA import rules. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) notified Canadian permit holders that cheek meat is not allowed to be shipped to the U.S. last Monday, Feb. 14. The inspector general said, however, it was too late because over 30 tons of the product has already entered the country. In addition, the inspector general expressed skepticism over whether just asking
by WLJ
2005 February 21
Large capacity poly forage applicator In-cab controlled rates of dry forage preservative for hay or silage can be easily managed with the Gandy poly forage applicator with positive displacement metering. The 2.3 cubic foot capacity translucent hopper has an instant shutoff and the application rate can be changed with the touch of a dial. The hopper provides 100-150 lb. capacity to cover more acres per fill, and the in-cab control allows rate adjustment to compensate for changes in flow of hay or silage. The underfed metering system eliminates dribble when not operating and is available in 2, 3 or 4-outlet configurations.
by WLJ
2005 February 21
An expected ramping up of slaughter volume this year is expected to result in cattle feeders’ struggling to show profits throughout 2005, according to a cattle market analytics firm. In addition, that profit deterioration will probably trickle down to producers supplying them with placement cattle, particularly stocker operators. During the annual Cattle Industry Convention Feb. 1-5 in San Antonio, TX, analysts for Cattle-Fax, Lone Tree, CO, told producers that recent herd rebuilding would result in almost 850,000 more fed steers and heifers being available for processing and that a lot of beef from those cattle would need to be discounted in
by WLJ
2005 February 21
A recent survey of ranchers revealed that 75 percent of cattle producers are using the latest in DNA technology to improve the cattle characteristics most associated with bettering the quality of beef. According to DNA testing company Bovigen, 75 percent of cattle producers are using the latest DNA testing technology to improve the quality of their beef cattle, and more than two-thirds of surveyed ranchers said they are realizing economic benefits from the technology. Forty-four percent of those who use the technology said they've seen increased efficiencies in management, offering such anecdotal comments as "it makes life simpler." Others gave long- term
by WLJ
2005 February 21
South Dakota is moving forward with a beef certification program that should boost profits for participating producers as well as meet requirements for a proposed animal identification program. South Dakota Gov. Mike Rounds is pushing for a South Dakota beef certification program because he says he is committed to raising the standards for beef production in the state and making sure that consumers all around the world know exactly what the state is doing. “It’s a vision of South Dakota being known by consumers worldwide as the home of the ‘World’s Best Beef,’” said Rounds. Gov. Rounds introduced the program as part of
by WLJ
2005 February 21
— Support stated for group’s action. Attorney generals from Montana, North and South Dakota, Nevada, New Mexico, Connecticut and West Virginia filed legal arguments in federal court last Wednesday supporting the Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund’s United Stockgrowers of America (R-CALF) legal challenge against USDA’s final rule regarding expanding imports of Canadian beef and cattle in the wake of BSE in that country. The attorneys general said they support the group's request for a temporary restraining order because USDA was very “hasty” in setting a March 7 implementation date for allowing more Canadian beef and live cattle into the U.S. “Our position is that
by WLJ
2005 February 21
A South Dakota House committee last week rejected a plan to set up a state beef checkoff system as a backup in case the U.S. Supreme Court rules the national program unconstitutional. The state’s agriculture committee voted 8-5 to kill the bill after officials of South Dakota agricultural organizations acknowledged they are split on the proposal. HB1182 would have created a state checkoff system for beef if the national system is declared unconstitutional. Supporters argued that the state should impose its own fee of $1 a head when cattle are sold so money would continue to be available to pay for promotion and
by WLJ
2005 February 21
A new EPD—Stayability—has been published in the American Simmental Association (ASA) Spring ’05 Sire Summary and will soon be available online. Calculated by Colorado State University’s Center for the Genetic Evaluation of Livestock, Stayability is defined as the probability that daughters entering the herd will stay in production through 6 years of age. “Stayability is a compound trait in that several factors may influence it,” said Dr. Wade Shafer, Director of Performance Programs at ASA. “From a Simmental Seedstock Producer’s prospective, traits such as fertility, soundness, productivity and temperament are candidates for influencing Stayability. To the degree that these traits influence commercial
by WLJ
2005 February 21
A new study by an international task force, "Global Risks of Infectious Animal Diseases," discusses the severe economic, social and political impacts of disease outbreaks and outlines national and international monitoring, surveillance and response practices. The comprehensive study, issued by the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, was written and evaluated by the task force of 13 authors and four reviewers from France, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. The paper brings together the expertise and experience of scientists and researchers on the front lines of this growing worldwide concern. It includes a historical review of the


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