Search: in Authors List
 

All Articles

by WLJ
2005 February 7
— Other indicators bearish. — Light volumes, moisture boost calf prices. Fed cattle trade activity was following the pattern set the previous three weeks with northern trade happening Thursday and southern cattle not being marketed until Friday. Through midday Thursday Nebraska cattle feeders had sold 15-20,000 head at mostly $140-141 dressed. No trade activity was reported in either Kansas or Texas, as packer bids were still hovering around $86, while asking prices from prospective sellers ranged $90-91. While early trade in northern feeding areas was $1-2 higher than two weeks ago, packer bids were starting to be pulled back with most getting back
by WLJ
2005 February 7
A top official of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries said Jan. 27 he believes the amount of U.S. beef imports to Japan will be limited even if a ban on such imports over BSE is lifted later this year, reports Kyodo. "Unfortunately, we would not be able to respond to demand from restaurants serving beef dishes and ox tongues," said Mamoru Ishihara, vice farm minister, at a press conference. Japan and the United States are expected to hold high-level talks in February aimed at striking an accord to lift Japan's ban on U.S. beef imports. If the two countries carry
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns met with Japanese Ambassador Ryozo Kato in Washington, DC, last week to stress the importance of the Japanese reopening their border to U.S. beef. Johanns says he realizes the importance of the beef issue and was looking to gauge Japan’s willingness to open the border. After the meeting, Johanns made a few comments to the news media about the discussion. First Johanns said he thanked the ambassador for their past working relationship when Johanns was the governor of a Midwestern state that thrived from major Japanese investments. On that note, Johanns proceeded to emphasize to the
by WLJ
2005 February 7
On any given day on the remote roads of Kansas, hundreds of tractor-trailers are hauling cattle across the state’s vast rangelands, headed for feedlots and slaughterhouses. And in an era of BSE and the threat of agroterrorism, federal agriculture regulators want to be able to locate within 48 hours—or sooner—the whereabouts of each of the nation’s 100 million-plus head of cattle. Enter a Kansas proposal that would combine GPS, cellular and radio frequency technologies to track cattle as they are in transit. It is one of the ideas the U.S. Department of Agriculture is testing and one that could shape the
by WLJ
2005 February 7
The long-held perception that consumption of high protein foods such as meat causes excess calcium loss is not true, according to research funded by the Beef Checkoff Program. The two-year study was conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center in Grand Forks, N.D. The research announced Jan. 28 confirms findings from other studies showing that protein from meat does not compromise calcium status. Meat protein can increase calcium absorption and has beneficial effects on bone health, said Dr. Sharon Miller, director of nutrition research for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, one of
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Rogue proteins like those that cause bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)—found previously only in brain, nerve and lymph tissues —have now been located in the liver, kidney and pancreas in a study of rodents. While the discovery raises the possibility that similar proteins could move into unanticipated parts of farm animals that have similar diseases, it isn't a reason for alarm, says researcher Adriano Aguzzi of the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland. But, he adds, "There is reason to reappraise critically the way regulations that are already in place" are enforced. Sick animals such as sheep and cows shouldn't enter the human food chain,
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Purebred Angus cattle dominated the 2004 National Angus Carcass Challenge (NACC), but they came from such diverse areas as Texas to Montana, Idaho to Iowa. Winners were from a wide range of genetic and management programs, fed in eight feedlots in five states and harvested at eight plants in six states. Stan and Brad Fansher, Garden City, KS., had their Grand Champion pen fed by neighbor and feeding partner of 15 years, Sam Hands, Triangle H Grain & Cattle Co. No one was surprised that these heifers did well—their sisters won reserve division champion in the 2003 NACC, and Fansher Angus
by WLJ
2005 February 7
The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) has named Jay Truitt as the next vice president of government affairs in its Washington, D.C., office. After an intensive selection process, NCBA Chief Executive Officer Terry Stokes officially announced the promotion last week. Truitt, NCBA’s executive director of legislative affairs since March 2001, officially took the helm of NCBA’s Washington office immediately. “Truitt brings exceptional leadership, lobbying, and management experience to his new role at NCBA,” says Stokes. “His ranching heritage from his family’s cow/calf operation in Missouri, his experience at the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and his previous role at NCBA provides a depth
by WLJ
2005 February 7
After considering input from producers at four meetings across the state, the Nebraska Cattlemen Board of Directors developed a plan to address six primary concerns its members have related to the USDA plan to resume live cattle imports from Canada beginning March 7. Those concerns include: • Canadian feed rule compliance: NC membership has concerns regarding Canada’s compliance rate with the ban on feeding ruminant byproducts to ruminant animals. So, NC will actively investigate Canada’s compliance by: 1. Thoroughly reviewing reports from USDA’s trade investigation team currently in Canada and from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association trade investigation team; 2. Seeking additional
by WLJ
2005 February 7
NATIONAL WESTERN MILE HIGH RED ANGUS CLASSIC Jan. 17, Denver, CO 16 Open heifers $4,347 3 Choice/Pick lots 5,466 2 Bulls 3,250 12 Embryo packages 2,264 5 Bred females 2,580 6 Flushes 2,925 6 Semen packages 1,525 Auctioneer: Kyle Gilchrist Sale Management: Amy and Kyle Gilchrist On fairly short notice—an incredible line-up of live cattle, embryo= s and flushes was assembled from progressive breeders of Red Angus cattle from across the country. Some of the freshest genetics in the breed were offered! A large crowd of mostly regular breeders from across the U.S. were on hand and were very active for a solid sale. TOPS—Glacier OSCE 403, 2 0/04, daughter of
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Joe Mendiburu Joe Mendiburu, 87, passed away at his home Jan. 20, five years and one day after his beloved wife, Jeannie, passed. Mendiburu was born in Bakersfield, California Aug. 18, 1917, to parents, Gregorio and Eulalia Mendiburu. He married Jeannie in May 1941, and followed in his father’s footsteps in the livestock business. He never missed a day of work, not even for vacation. His day always involved the purchase of sheep or cattle and he loved working alongside his faithful and longtime employees, and they would vouch that no one could work the cattle chute like he could. He was very proud
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Drought, declining water tables, and legal issues are limiting the amount of irrigation water available. University of Nebraska-Lincoln forage specialist, Bruce Anderson producers who don't have enough water to grow a good grain crop, may be able to rely on forages. Anderson realizes that many irrigated acres won't receive enough water this summer to grow a grain or root crop. He says sometimes producers can combine water allocated for several fields onto one field to get a crop, but that still leaves the other acres with little or no water at all. Forage crops also need water for high production, but, unlike
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Recent European research has indicated that one livestock-specific transmissible encephalopathy (TSE) has been found to harbor in the livers of transgenic mice. However, U.S. cattle industry scientists have said that research is misleading many U.S. producers to the wrong conclusion about BSE and its infectivity in cattle. The research conducted by a Zurich, Switzerland, scientist indicated that scrapie, a disease said to be isolated to sheep and other related small ruminants, was found in the mice of livers when introduced into the mice. Upon the release of that information earlier this month, the scientists behind the research said that there shouldn’t be
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Calling a move to increase the maximum dose of radiation that can be used to treat food risky for human health, the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen said Monday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration should revoke its ruling allowing the change. Public Citizen made its comments to the FDA on the last day such comments could be made, according to a release from the organization. The group requested a public haring about the health effects of consuming such food. The rule would boost the energy level of X-rays that could be used to irradiate fruit, vegetables, beef, poultry, pork, eggs
by WLJ
2005 February 7
— Also demands Canada tests 50,000 annually. A hearing date of March 2 has been set by a United States district court judge concerning a request for preliminary injunction filed against USDA’s Final Rule regarding Canadian cattle and beef exports to the U.S. If granted, the injunction filed by R-CALF USA would prevent the border from opening to live Canadian cattle 30 months of age and younger and all Canadian beef, regardless of the age of the source. Additionally, R-CALF has requested that Canada must test a minimum of 50,000 cattle a year to gain a true assessment of its BSE prevalence. Ranchers-Cattlemen
by WLJ
2005 February 7
— Other diseases respond to later vaccinations. As calving season has either started or is on the verge of starting, producers are urged to take a serious look at how they manage calves through the first several weeks of their lives and prevent the spread of both viral and bacterial forms of scours, veterinarians told producers last Tuesday during the Cattlemen’s College portion of the Cattle Industry Annual Convention, Feb. 1-5, San Antonio, TX. According to Dr. Rob Callan, professor of veterinary medicine and cattle health specialist at Colorado State University, producers can eliminate the prevalence of calf scours by separating calves
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns got an unofficial welcome to Washington last Thursday when he testified to an at-times hostile Senate Agricultural Committee hearing. In sharp contrast to the warm reception at his confirmation hearings, Johanns faced probing questions about USDA's plans to reopen the Canadian border to live cattle. Johanns was also grilled about the lack of progress in opening the Japanese and other foreign markets to U.S. beef, as well as a lack of transparency in allowing some potentially dangerous products, such as tongue, into the country from Canada. The big issue, though, was the USDA final rule's contradictory exclusion of
by WLJ
2005 February 7
As tax preparation gets under way, agricultural producers need to be aware of a number of changes in tax regulations. "Staying up to date on these changes will help producers prepare their returns accurately," says Ron Haugen, North Dakota State University Extension Service farm economist. "Producers have until March 1 to file their returns without penalty. If they made an estimated tax payment by Jan. 18, they have until April 15 to file." Items to note for 2004 income tax preparation: • The personal exemption amount has increased to $3,100. • The standard deduction has increased to $9,700 for those who are married, filing
by WLJ
2005 February 7
Taiwan is expected to announce by the end of February the results of its federal inspections of U.S. packing facilities that were supposed to mark the final stage in allowing U.S. beef back into the island nation, according to officials with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Taiwan suspended beef from the U.S. in December 2003 due to safety concerns over bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) after the discovery of a singe case of the disease at a Washington state farm. Several USDA officials said Taiwan health and agriculture officials have traveled to the U.S. and have conducted on-site inspections of the implementation
by WLJ
2005 February 7
A federal judge ruled Tuesday that President George W. Bush’s administration violated the Endangered Species Act when it relaxed protections on many of the gray wolves in the U.S. The decision by U.S. District Judge Robert E. Jones in Portland, OR, rescinds a rule change that allowed ranchers to shoot wolves on sight if they were attacking livestock, said Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental group. In April 2003, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service divided the wolves’ range into three areas and reclassified the Eastern and Western populations as threatened instead of endangered. The Eastern segment covers


Sales Calendar


Goto live view to see the calendar