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by WLJ
2008 June 20
Thinking BIG about beef —The Beef Innovation Group’s first creative product award winner is always looking at beef in a new light. Gene Gagliardi, president of Visionary Design/Smithfield Beef, not only thinks outside the box—he thinks off the plate and clean out of the kitchen at times. That’s not surprising, since his job is creating new food products. He’s intently interested in what and how consumers eat, especially when they’re out of the home. His mind always seems to be working in "better mousetrap" mode. Although he refers to himself simply as a "meat cutter," Gagliardi is responsible for a number of highly successful
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Fire at Minnesota Beef Minnesota Beef Industries in Buffalo Lake, MN, was the recipient of extensive damage in a fire over the weekend of June 14 that caused the plant to lose nearly a day’s worth of meat production. Local fire chief Gayle Deal said that more than 300 carcasses may have potentially been damaged due to smoke and would need to be destroyed. Minnesota Beef Industries processes some 370 head per day. Deal estimated damages to the facility could reach $2 million, while the state fire marshal continues to investigate the cause of the blaze. Reports indicate that no one
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Maintaining livestock health after a flood If your fields or farm buildings have been flooded, take special precautions against flood-related accidents or diseases in poultry and livestock. Give animals extra care, particularly if they have been stranded by floodwater and have been off regular feeding schedules. Keep fields clear of harmful debris, and clean buildings as soon as possible. In addition, watch for signs of flood-related diseases such as lameness, fever, difficulty breathing, muscle contractions or swelling of shoulder, chest, back, neck or throat. Be prepared to contact a veterinarian if you spot trouble. Disease control Following a flood, there may be danger
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Basic corral design and planning Working facilities are needed to carry out basic management practices. Some small producers feel that working facilities are too expensive, but without proper facilities, basic management practices are not done. Not doing basic management practices such as dehorning and castration can lead to economic losses as a result of discounts on your calves. Handling facilities also increase the safety for humans when working animals. Planning The goal is to develop a design that accommodates your cattle working needs while making safe and efficient use of available labor and reducing stress and bruising of animals. Site selection Accessibility by people, trucks,
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Flood damage assessments underway —Corn, soybean prices jump on crop report news. As weather conditions ease in Iowa and elsewhere in the Corn Belt, farmers are assessing the damage done by rainfall which was more than double the normal amount for this time of year. USDA and market analysts said the disaster covered as much as 5 million acres of farm ground throughout the region and caused devastation to rural and urban areas alike. For growers and users of corn and soy beans, the repercussions of the flood will continue to be felt for the next year, at least, as lost and
by WLJ
2008 June 20
NAIS hits snag; court rules on privacy laws Critics of the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) are commending the June 4 actions of a federal district judge which blocked USDA from applying Privacy Act safeguards to the information it has already collected on animal owners. The ruling came from Judge Emmitt Sullivan of the federal district court in Washington, D.C., which halts indefinitely USDA’s plans to protect animal owner information under the Privacy Act. Opponents of NAIS feared that protection of the information under the act would lead to unnecessary secrecy. The recent court ruling is a result of a lawsuit filed by
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Limousin trends favorable for scrotal circumference, docility, carcass traits Cattle producers can accomplish significant genetic improvement in a short period when using effective selection tools, such as expected progeny differences (EPDs), to deal with moderately heritable traits. The Limousin breed’s phenotypic trends in scrotal circumference (SC), docility and carcass traits illustrate that fact. "Based on documented phenotypic trends, Limousin breeders are using selection and management effectively to produce seedstock with improved performance profiles," said Kent Andersen, Ph.D., executive vice president for the North American Limousin Foundation (NALF). "Commercial users of Limousin genetics are the beneficiaries of those breed improvements." From 1997 to 2007,
by WLJ
2008 June 20
The IRS "Audit Technique Guide" The IRS issues an Audit Technique Guide to provide guidance to revenue agents in various topics, including the IRS hobby loss rule which applies to activities such as farming, livestock and horses. The guide tells agents to refrain from using the term, "hobby loss," and instead refer to "activities not engaged in for profit." The guide is over 50 pages long and covers many important details. The guide is available on the Internet by searching "Market Segment Specialization Program." Anyone facing an audit should read it, and it is a good resource for CPAs as well. The overall
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Korea beef deal still in limbo Weeks after a Washington, D.C., summit which saw the U.S. and South Korea agree to a new beef trade deal, the new pact has been left on the sidelines as negotiators for both countries work to assuage Korean consumer fears over bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Newly-seated South Korean President Lee Myung-bak has come under fire for "selling out" his countrymen and their food safety in what has led to a major political crisis in the country. Protestors numbering up to nearly 1 million have taken to the streets of Seoul in recent weeks to demand a
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Supreme Court rejects horse slaughter case Horse slaughter in the U.S. lost its final battle last week when the Supreme Court refused to hear the lawsuit fild by Dekalb, IL-based Cavel International. The company was the last of three remaining U.S. horse processors impacted by increasing scrutiny and regulatory pressure last year. Two others, both in Texas, stopped operations last year after a New Orleans federal court upheld a 1949 Texas law that banned the sale of horse meat. The Cavel plant closed last fall after the state implemented laws designed to prevent the plant from slaughtering horses for human consumption. An attorney
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Cattle fly control: Self-treatment devices Control of the face fly is difficult because it is generally on the face of the animal, an area difficult to treat, and because it spends little time on the animal. Treatment is generally achieved with self-treatment devices; dust bags, oilers and insecticide-impregnated ear tags. Dust bags provide the best control if they are used in a forced treatment situation where the animal has to pass under them to obtain water, feed or mineral. If cattle have access to water from ponds or streams, it is difficult to devise a forced-use system. If dust bags are used
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Wyoming Beef Council elects officers for fiscal year 2009 Wyoming beef producers were named to leadership positions at the June 16, 2008, Wyoming Beef Council (WBC) meeting. The volunteer leaders will help shape the direction and outline priorities for the administration of Wyoming’s $1-per head Beef Checkoff in fiscal year 2009. Elected chairman of WBC was Jim Hellyer of Lander. Hellyer is a cow/calf producer in a family partnership in Fremont County. He was appointed to WBC by Gov. Freudenthal in 2006 and had been the Wyoming Stock Growers Association (WSGA) liaison to WBC prior to that. He has been a member
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Bayer Animal Health introduces Tempo SC Ultra Pest Control Concentrate Powerful things often come in small packages, which is especially true for the new TempoSC Ultra Pest Control Concentrate (11.8 percent beta-cyfluthrin) from Bayer Animal Health, available in a convenient 32 mL bottle. This 5th-generation pyrethroid insecticide has long been an effective broad spectrum tool to control indoor, outdoor, and wood-infesting pests in and around livestock premises, and it is effective on more than 60 different pests. With the availability of Tempo SC Ultra in a 32 mL bottle, smaller livestock operations and farms can now buy just what they need, providing
by WLJ
2008 June 20
$228 million paid as compensation for lost taxes on federal lands Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne announced that local governments with tax-exempt federal land in their jurisdictions will receive $228.5 million this year in compensation for forgone tax revenue. Under the federal Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) Program, the money is distributed to about 1,850 county and other local governments around the nation to help pay for essential services such as firefighting and emergency response, and to help improve school, road and water systems. "These communities play a key role in supporting federal lands throughout the year," Kempthorne said. "We recognize
by WLJ
2008 June 20
Brucellosis confirmed in Wyoming —Finding jeopardizes class-free status The Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory (WSVL) recently reported that it had cultured Brucella abortus from the tissues of two reactive cows from a ranch near Daniel, WY. The cows were discovered at a western Wyoming sale barn during the course of routine blood testing for the bacterium which produced two reactive tests requiring follow-up lab testing. The finding comes shortly after Montana’s second discovery of the disease within a year, which will result in the removal of that state’s class-free status. Testing to determine the strain and source of the disease in the Montana case
by WLJ
2008 June 20
BLM seeks bids for new wild horse pasture facilities As part of its responsibility to manage, protect, and control wild horses and burros, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is soliciting bids for one or more new pasture facilities located anywhere in the continental U.S. Each pasture facility must be able to provide humane care for and maintain at least 500 wild horses—up to as many as 2,500—over a one-year period with an option under BLM contract for four additional one-year extensions. BLM needs additional space for wild horses placed in long-term holding facilities, all of which are currently located in
by WLJ
2008 June 13
Is the price difference between steers and "cutter bulls" big enough? Oklahoma State University nutritionists and veterinarians took a close look at the performance differences while receiving bull calves versus steer calves during a 44-day backgrounding period. A total of 111 bulls and 204 steers were purchased from different auctions and received at the Willard Sparks Beef Cattle Research Center for the experiment. Animals were processed after a 24-hour period and calves that arrived as bulls were surgically castrated. Health was assessed by trained personnel every morning and animals that met the pull criteria were taken to the processing facility and rectal
by WLJ
2008 June 13
Lynn Cornwell Lynn Cornwell, 56, died Thursday, June 5, 2008, at Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital in Glasgow, MT. Ward "Lynn" Cornwell was born with his twin brother Lee, Aug. 15, 1951, in Glasgow, MT, son of Bill and Ann Cornwell. Being born into a life that he loved and would have chosen for himself was a blessing for Lynn. His devotion to ranching and the livestock industry was truly unique, and a passion that came from within. Lynn’s impact on his family, the community and the entire livestock industry has been immense. Lynn passed away from an aortic aneurysm. Lynn attended grade school at
by WLJ
2008 June 13
Southwest Border Food Safety and Defense Center prepares state for agriculture emergencies New Mexico is one of the best prepared states for an agriculture emergency thanks to the efforts of the Southwest Border Food Safety and Defense Center located at New Mexico State University (NMSU). In preparation for agriculture emergencies, whether they are caused by natural disasters, disease or humans, response trailers are stationed in Albuquerque, Clovis and Las Cruces. The trailers contain equipment necessary for a quick response to an incident anywhere in the state, including personal protective equipment, decontamination equipment, emergency power equipment, and other supplies. Kits the size of army
by WLJ
2008 June 13
Montana confirms second brucellosis case Early last week, officials from the Montana Department of Livestock (MDL) announced that a positive test for brucellosis had been confirmed on a heifer in the Paradise Valley area north of Yellowstone National Park. The finding comes just one year after the disease was discovered in a cattle herd near Bridger, which resulted in the depopulation of two herds totaling 301 cows and 284 calves. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) regulations require the state to step up testing and remain brucellosis-free until July 2009 to maintain its brucellosis-free status. An MDL release said that testing performed


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