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by WLJ
2007 December 20
February 5, 2007   H.M. Small Scholarship honors pioneering Wheatland rancher. The Wyoming Stock Growers Association (WSGA) will award the H.M. Small Scholarship from the bequest made in memory of a pioneering rancher who had only a third-grade education. This is the seventh and final year of this scholarship. The H.M. Small Scholarship will award the final $3,000 to a University of Wyoming sophomore, junior or senior majoring in an agriculture-related subject and maintaining a grade point average of at least 3.5. To be eligible for the award, applicants must also write an essay of no more than 500 words on the importance of
by WLJ
2007 December 20
OW Lilly 4177, DS Alil showcup pld, Oakwater Ranch of Mansfield, MO. Reserve Champion Junior Female Calf: Thomas Ms Kyra 4541P, Thomas Oahe Wind 0772ET P, Thomas Ranch of Harrold, SD. Champion Senior Female Calf: DR Roxy 613, LHD Cougar L105, Natalie Reis of Gridley, CA. Reserve Champion Senior Female Calf: DR Alexis 873 ET, Baldridge Cadillac 73E, Nicole Reis of Gridley, CA. Champion Intermediate Female: PC Ms Lucky Lady P306 Pld, RA Big Cat 9017 pld, Patman Ranch of Waxahatchie, TX. Reserve Champion Intermediate Female: BBRCR Fancys Trademark 300P, CJC Trademark H45, Danni Lunsford, Garrison, TX. Champion Junior Female: EC Miss Million, SCC Millennium
by WLJ
2007 December 20
February 12, 2007 Group says it will appeal to state Supreme Court. The Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) filed a petition for certification last week seeking the Arizona Supreme Court’s review of their January 2005 loss in a libel suit won by Arizona rancher Jim Chilton and the Chilton Ranch and Cattle Company. CBD lost for a second time in December 2006 when the Arizona Court of Appeals unanimously affirmed the jury’s verdict in favor of the Chiltons. The three appellate judges also upheld the jury award of $100,000 in damages and $500,000 in punitive damages to the victims. CBD asserts that
by WLJ
2007 December 20
February 12, 2007 Light fed cattle trade developed at mid-week last week with many areas seeing better money for cattle. Trade last Wednesday came in Nebraska and the western Corn Belt at $90 live and $145 dressed basis. In Iowa and Minnesota, a few early live sales traded $3-4 higher at $90 and a few dressed sales traded $6 higher at $144. Trading was inactive Wednesday on a very light demand in the southern Plains and Colorado. In the south, feedlots were asking $92 for cattle versus packer bids of mostly $87 at press time last Thursday. The last established market
by WLJ
2007 December 20
46 Bulls $4,025 14 Heifers 2,868 TOPSC Grand Champion Bull: CW 225 Future Direction 184, consigned by Cottonwood Angus Farms, Pipestone, MN; to Mt. Rushmore Angus, Rapid City, SD, $11,000. Reserve Champion Bull: CW 08 Future Direction 334, consigned by Cottonwood Angus Farms, Pipestone, MN; to Mangen Angus, Broadus, MT, $7,500. Grand Champion Heifer: Traveler Rose 301, consigned by Kammerer Livestock, Rapid City, SD; to Thomas Ranch, Harrold, SD, $4,000. Reserve Champion Heifer: Miss JT Diamond Rita 401, consigned by Sletten Angus, Faith, SD; to Bud Fortune, Quinn, SD, $2,900. Top Selling Bull: Lewis New Frontier 394, consigned by Lewis Angus Ranch, Black
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Jan. 29, Red Bluff, CA 137 Angus $2,805 14 Balancer 2,625 15 Brangus 2,253 43 Charolais 2,528 1 Chiangus 2,850 5 Gelbvieh 2,430 53 Hereford 2,515 2 Limousin 2,750 16 Polled Hereford 2,313 6 Red Angus 2,917 3 Shorthorn 2,300 7 Simmental 3,729 302 Total bulls 2,664 Auctioneers: Rick Machado, Max Olvera, Justin Holmberg Sale Manager: Ron Anderson This year=s version of the Red Bluff bull sale turned in some eye-popping numbers as 52 more head were sold over last year= s sale and the average price per bull was $250 higher. What made this happen? More than likely the same market fundamentals that fueled the fall bull sale season were at work here. The strong
by WLJ
2007 December 20
After devastating storms crippled southeastern Colorado agriculture, ranchers were hit with another big blow on Feb. 14 as the U.S. Army announced its intentions to move forward with acquiring over 418,000 acres of private land for the expansion of the Pinon Canyon Maneuvering Site. “With the federal government already owning one-third of Colorado lands, the potential acquisition of almost one-half of a million acres is a real jaw dropper,” said Aaron Johnson from the office of Congresswoman Marilyn Musgrave, R-CO. The Army announced that the Under Secretary of Defense granted a requested waiver to the moratorium on major land acquisition.
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Stielow, Bateman, Kayser are officers for 2007. The Cattlemen’s Beef Board (CBB) seated new board members and elected officers and representatives for its 2007 Executive Committee and Beef Promotion Operating Committee during its annual meeting in Nashville, TN, Feb. 3, 2007. In addition, CBB unanimously elected Paradise, KS, cattleman Ken Stielow to serve as 2007 chairman of the board, with outgoing chairman Jay O’Brien of Texas handing over the gavel as he ended his term. Illinois cattleman Dave Bateman was elected vice chairman, and Neil Kayser of Washington was elected to serve as secretary/treasurer of CBB for the year. After being appointed by
by WLJ
2007 December 20
A mind of its own The market gets what it wants. That is demand in action. As it wants more and better, it pays more, efficiently sorting and sending premium and discount messages. But it’s not quite that simple. Sometimes an amazingly perfect item, or animal, sells for less than average price, a diamond in the rough. A delighted buyer comes back, willing to pay much more, but cannot find another at any price. Many more barely acceptable products—including cattle—enter the market every day. There are enough buyers to pay the clearing price up front, though they pay another price in
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Under proposed USDA import rule, animal would have been eligible for U.S. shipment. The USDA’s efforts to open the Canadian border to live cattle imports born after March 1, 1999, hit a snag last week when the country’s ninth domestic case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was confirmed in what Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) officials called a mature bull from Alberta, Canada. Senior veterinarian for CFIA, George Luterbach, said last week that the owner of the animal reported that it was likely born after the feed ban was implemented. “Based on some very preliminary information provided by the owner, the
by WLJ
2007 December 20
R-CALF digresses Last week, R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America sent out a news release saying the board had named a new president of the organization. On the surface, it all seemed pretty mundane. Then the phone calls started and the rumor mill was in full swing. As usual, there is a lot of information people consider fact that is nothing more than fabrication. And most of the information is pretty worthless, but not all. R-CALF recently had their annual convention in Denver, CO. Roughly 300 people attended the meeting. This year I stopped by, for the first time ever, and
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The livestock industry may need to alter feeding methods and other animal health practices if Congress gets its way. Last week, bills were introduced in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate which, if passed, would significantly restrict the use of non-therapeutic antibiotics and other products which have human health applications. The bill, which supporters say will prevent the increase of antibiotic resistant disease, was introduced in the Senate by Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Chairman Edward M. Kennedy, D-MA, and Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-ME, and in the U.S. House of Representatives by Rules Committee Chairwoman Louise
by WLJ
2007 December 20
USDA economists dusted off their crystal ball last week and released their annual Long-Term Agricultural Projections report last week. The agency projected that through 2016, strong markets at home and abroad will continue to fuel overall U.S. farm income increase. The projections show that farm incomes will rise from $60.6 billion in 2006 to an average of $66.7 billion over the next 10 years. That is good news for U.S. producers but gains for some segments of the industry will come at the expense of others, according to the report. Much of the farm industry income will come in the
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Cattle markets found their feet last week and prices started moving higher, strengthened by a $14 rise in the Choice boxed beef cutout in seven days. Although trade was limited in the fed cattle market last week, there was some light trade last Thursday in Nebraska at $147 dressed. Bids in other major feeding areas were still well apart. However, most expected a trading range of $92-$93 live basis and $148-$149 dressed. The last fully established fed cattle trade came late in the day on Feb. 2 at $91 in the southern Plains. In Nebraska, live sales were at $90
by WLJ
2007 December 20
This year’s hay market has climbed higher than average annual prices and at present, it shows no signs of stopping its rise. Hay stocks across the Plains and much of the West are at or near all-time lows and many markets are reporting high demand and low supply. Hay auctions in Wyoming last week reported prices for feeder quality hay in a range of $135-165 per ton. “The big bales of cow hay were getting pretty good bidding at the Torrington hay auction last week,” said Ken Betschart of Frontier Feeding and Farming located in Torrington, WY. “There was a lot
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Tax tips for livestock owners Many people who own livestock farms are full-time professionals in non-farming fields—doctors, for instance. The IRS often enough will assess deficiencies against these individuals based on the idea that the activity is simply a means of generating tax write-offs. The IRS might argue that, given your full-time day job, you don’t have much time to manage the operations. According to numerous Tax Court cases, working on the farm only on weekends and holidays is not enough time to devote to a cattle or other livestock venture unless you have a qualified farm manager whom you supervise during
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The Defenders of Wildlife, a national wildlife organization responsible for compensating ranchers for livestock losses due to wolf attacks, paid out a record $181,700 last year. More than $154,000 was paid to ranchers in the northern Rockies’ states of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Suzanne Stone, Northern Rockies representative of Defenders for the wolf compensation division, said those numbers will continue to climb as more claims from 2006 continue to be filed. Defenders is currently the only group that provides compensation to ranchers who lose livestock to wolves. “It’s been a great tool for them and they’ve marketed it well,” said Jay
by WLJ
2007 December 20
A recent study cosponsored by the Livestock Marketing Association and Global Animal Management (GAM) has shown that three in every four auction market operators feel that age and source verified cattle is imperative to being competitive in future beef markets. “As a leader in animal identification and tracking technology, we conducted this research to better understand the market needs and opportunities for age and source verified cattle, as well as those with certified health processes,” said Jim Heinle, president of GAM. A total of 86 auction market owners were surveyed from Florida to California. “We wanted to get information from across the U.S.
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Despite two consecutive weeks of blizzard conditions which left 15 foot drifts covering large parts of the state, USDA officials last week denied Colorado’s request for blizzard aid for farmers and ranchers. Early estimates have shown that more than 10,000 cattle have died due to the blizzards. In addition, 100 percent of the winter pastures historically available for breeding stock for forage has been lost. Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter requested USDA to declare a disaster in 10 Colorado counties. In their rejection of the request, USDA stated there was not enough evidence of agricultural loss from the two devastating blizzards
by WLJ
2007 December 20
“All indications point to more problems with calf scours due to the excessively wet conditions and over-crowding,” said Dr. Jack Whittier, beef extension specialist at Colorado State University. “This is particularly true in southeastern Colorado as cattle on winter ranges have been closely confined for feeding purposes due to the extensive amounts of snow.” Calf scours is a relatively complex disease that is caused by a variety of infectious agents. When a calf is born, the animal’s gut is still very immature and remains the weakest point of the calf’s system. The introduction of almost any infectious agent will cause the