Search: in Authors List
 

All Articles

by WLJ
2008 September 12
Fall is the best time to treat perennial weeds in crops and pasture, said a University of Nebraska–Lincoln (UNL) specialist. Herbicides sprayed in fall weaken the weeds and then the winter kills them, said Bob Klein, cropping systems specialist at UNL’s West Central Research and Extension Center in North Platte. Spring spraying weakens weeds, but then they have ideal conditions to recover. Klein advised producers to spray when the weeds are actively growing. As they prepare for winter, they’re taking nutrients down to the roots to store them for winter, he said, and the herbicide also moves down into the roots, which
by WLJ
2008 September 12
Economies of scale are an important consideration for any business and can lead to greater profitability. However, if that greater scale principle is applied to individual cow weights on the ranch we quickly find out that bigger is not better. Variation in individual cow weights in the U.S. is up to 1,000 pounds. It is not uncommon to see variation of this magnitude in any given herd, even relatively small herds. Kris Ringwall of North Dakota State University (NDSU) recently reported in Beef Talk that the mature weight of 102 cows in two herds at the Dickinson Research Extension Center in
by WLJ
2008 September 12
There’s a new attempt to legislate what horse owners can do with their animals circulating through Congress. If passed, the bill introduced by Rep. John Conyers, D-MI, would make it a federal criminal offense to knowingly move, sell, purchase or transport a horse for human consumption. House of Representatives bill 6598 (H.R. 6598) would be the last act in the slaughter of horses and perhaps even the sale of horses in the U.S. It would perhaps be the final nail in the coffin of marketing unwanted horses through the local auction market. It would further devalue the horse market and
by WLJ
2008 September 5
The District of Columbia Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals ruled on Aug. 29 that USDA does not have to allow Creekstone Farms Premium Beef, LLC to conduct 100 percent testing for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) on all the cattle it slaughters. In the 2-1 split decision ruling, chief judge David Sentelle offered the dissenting opinion in the case which has seen USDA refuse to offer BSE testing kits to Creekstone under authority granted to the agency in the 1913 Virus-Serum-Toxin-Act (VSTA). Sentelle said USDA "exceeds the bounds of reasonableness" by invoking a law enacted to prevent the sale of
by WLJ
2008 September 5
As much-needed moisture moved into the Mississippi Valley and southern Corn Belt last week, analysts were saying the rains from Hurricane Gustav could help boost crop conditions and that the above normal temperatures predicted for the remainder of the month could help the corn and soybean yields reach levels predicted by USDA last month. "August was very dry, so the area could use some rain," explains AccuWeather.com agriculture expert senior meteorologist Dale Mohler. "A couple of inches from Gustav will help to round out the crops before harvest." He noted that temperatures near- to above-normal will add to the overall favorable conditions
by WLJ
2008 September 5
Fed cattle trade was at a standstill at mid-day last Thursday with several dollars still separating packers and feedlots during a week that most analysts were expecting at least steady money. The full week’s trade was expected to occur in the neighborhood of $99 live in the south and $154-156 dressed in the north. The holiday-shortened slaughter week was helping to support beef cutout values as packers gear up for the tight supplies and increased demand anticipated during the final quarter of the year. The reduced kill, just 387,000 head through last Thursday, did little to maintain cutout prices at levels
by WLJ
2008 September 5
For cow/calf operators, backgrounders, feeders, packers and retailers, Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) has become a source of some concern as the industry prepares for its transition into verifying the origin of all the beef that hits retail shelves. From ranchers to retailers and everyone in between, coming up with a way to streamline the record-keeping process necessary for COOL has become a big question, one which may have been recently answered. In a meeting bringing together over 30 livestock, retail and food industry organizations and companies, a plan was formed on Aug. 26 in Kansas City, MO, on how to
by WLJ
2008 September 5
By extending the grazing season into the fall and winter, many producers can reduce their harvested feed costs, said a University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) specialist. Although winter or dormant season grazing of pasture and feeding of a protein supplement is a common practice, several other strategies can work well for producers in other parts of the state, said Jerry Volesky, range and forage specialist at UNL’s West Central Research and Extension Center in North Platte. Producers can start now to prepare for extending the season by planting annual forages such as oats and turnips to use later, he said. They can also
2008 September 5
Wintering cattle requires feed. The current tight inventories of feed suggest that cow culling should be deep. Yet, once the culling is done but the bales still don’t add up, the time is right to contact a good beef cattle nutritionist. The nutritionist can help develop a "least cost" ration. When developing the least-cost ration, feedstuffs may need to be purchased. One needs to be careful and review all options. Through the years, most of us have witnessed the detrimental effects of underfeeding or the results of overfeeding. The important point is that the nutrient value of feed is what
by WLJ
2008 September 5
Range monitoring requires a working knowledge of plant identification. But acquiring the knowledge can be a daunting challenge that often prevents producers from implementing important aspects of range monitoring. "However, one does not have to be a plant identification expert," says Chuck Lura, Extension rangeland specialist at the North Dakota State University (NDSU) Central Grasslands Research Extension Center near Streeter. "Simply knowing a few key species and monitoring their abundance can provide producers with valuable information." Accurate monitoring helps rangeland managers determine whether their grazing management strategy is working. Key species are species in a pasture that can serve as indicators of management effectiveness.
by WLJ
2008 September 5
Beef growing globally Emphasizing the need to invest in foreign marketing aimed at the 95 percent of people who live outside the borders of the U.S., the Cattlemen’s Beef Board has chosen to increase the total dollars invested in marketing U.S. beef abroad. Export volumes of U.S. beef and beef variety meats worldwide advanced 30 percent year-on-year to 445,036 metric tons during the first half of 2008, while value jumped 39 percent to nearly $1.6 billion—compared to $1.8 billion during the same period in 2003. And while Mexico and Canada continued to be the top-performing export markets for the U.S. during
by WLJ
2008 September 5
The road to Livestock Marketing Association’s (LMA’s) 2009 World Livestock Auctioneer Championship (WLAC) begins in Miles City, MT, Sept. 9 for 32 contestants. Miles City Livestock Commission LLP is hosting the first 2009 WLAC quarterfinal competition. Three titlists will be named at each contest, and the top eight scorers will qualify for next June’s WLAC, set to be at Fergus Falls Livestock Auction Market Inc., Fergus Falls, MN. The other WLAC quarterfinals will be Oct. 29 at Texhoma Livestock Auction LLC, Texhoma, OK; Nov. 18 at Muskingum Livestock Auction Co., Zanesville, OH, and Dec. 2 at Kingsville Livestock Auction, Kingsville, MO. LMA, the
by WLJ
2008 September 5
Even though the cattle industry continues to round up good prices for cattle, Steve and Morita Schoeneberg of Louise, TX, wrestle with higher input costs in their operation. The Schoenebergs operate a 600-head cattle ranch on about 1,800 acres along the Texas Gulf Coast, southwest of Houston. While they grow most of their own forage, they feel the effects of high fuel and fertilizer prices. "More and more with the cost of everything, I feel we are just spinning our wheels," said Morita, who attended the 54th annual Texas A&M University Beef Short Course while her husband stayed home to work the
by WLJ
2008 September 5
A research team headed by Kansas State University (KSU) E. coli O157:H7 expert T.G. Nagaraja has been tapped by USDA to study both the connection between feeding distillers grains and E. coli 0157:H7 in cattle and several strategies to reduce the presence of the naturally occurring pathogen in the animals. The group has received a $939,220 National Research Initiative in Food Safety grant. Nagaraja, a university distinguished professor of microbiology, said the issue of meat safety is receiving full attention from both researchers and the meat industry and is being addressed. "This research project will greatly enhance our understanding of the exact
2008 September 5
Lauren Keith Liddicoat Lauren Keith Liddicoat, known to family and friends as Keith, passed away in Las Vegas, NV, at the Nathan Adelson Hospice following a tough battle with Alzheimer’s Disease and cancer. Keith was born in Butte, MT, Sept. 2, 1941, and passed on Aug. 24, 2008. Keith worked a full 30-plus years at Coors Brewery in Golden, CO, as an Instrument Technician and moved to Pahrump, NV, several years ago following his retirement. Keith was a true westerner with a strong love for rodeo and golf as well as hunting and bowling. In his earlier years, he sacrificed much
by WLJ
2008 September 5
Sand County Foundation and Nebraska Cattlemen (NC) are proud to announce the finalists for the 2008 Leopold Conservation Award in Nebraska. The Leopold Conservation Award, named in honor of world-renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold, is comprised of $10,000 and a Leopold crystal. The award is presented annually in seven states to private landowners who practice responsible land stewardship and management. "These finalists were chosen from a number of exceptional, well-deserving candidates," said Dr. Brent Haglund, Sand County Foundation president. "This is proof that Nebraska ranchers’ long-standing ethic of conservation continues to flourish." The 2008 finalists (in alphabetical order): A.B. Cox—Valentine; Gosnell Ranch, Gordon and
by WLJ
2008 September 5
As a service to hay producers and buyers, the Colorado Department of Agriculture publishes the Colorado Hay Directory annually. The 2008 edition of the directory is available to the public at no cost. "Hay continues to be one of Colorado’s top crops," said Wendy White, marketing specialist for the Colorado Department of Agriculture. "The directory helps Colorado’s hay producers market their hay, and is a valuable resource for buyers across Colorado and the nation." The 22nd edition of the Colorado Hay Directory features more than 100 producers and brokers of hay as well as companies that provide hay-related products and services. Categorized
by WLJ
2008 September 5
"This year, we’ve had some record high cow prices and we expect them to go even higher next year, said Jim Robb, director of the Livestock Marketing Information Center. During a recent Open House at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory, Robb said the demand for hamburger has increased dramatically as the U.S. economy has slowed. This is an area where cow/calf producers need to focus some of their management attention. Even though cow slaughter in the U.S. has been very high, mostly in the southeastern states and California, beef imports from Australia, New Zealand and South America have declined dramatically.
by WLJ
2008 September 5
—Europeans move to block imports of U.S. products which may have been derived from clones. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) admitted last week that it is possible that milk and meat from cloned animals or their offspring may have already entered the U.S. food supply, although the agency said it was impossible to know for certain. FDA spokeswoman Siobhan DeLancey told the Associated Press last week that with an estimated 600 cloned animals in the U.S. herd, "it is theoretically possible" that food products from cloned animals have already become a part of the nation’s food supply. "I don’t know whether
by WLJ
2008 September 5
Net farm income is forecast to be $95.7 billion, 10.3 percent above the $86.8 billion farmers are estimated to have earned in 2007 and 57 percent above the 10-year average of $61.1 billion. Net cash income, at $101.3 billion, is forecast to be $13.9 billion above 2007. This would be the first time that net cash income has exceeded $100 billion. Net cash income is projected to rise more than net farm income because of the carryover of 2007 crops, which are being sold in 2008. The story for 2008 is the value of crop production which, at $188.8 billion, is forecast


Sales Calendar