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by WLJ
2007 December 20
Producers from both nation’s gave an in-depth look at how outfits in the two different regions operate and highlighted the reasons they have been successful in the international markets. Perhaps the two countries’ greatest competitive advantage lies in their low cost of production and mandatory national animal tracing systems. In Uruguay, the country’s newly implemented system operates in real-time, allowing administrators to track cattle as they are moved throughout the country. Because of the country’s level terrain and small size, its tracking system is not feasible elsewhere. However, it has allowed producers there the ability to complete even the most
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The 97 head of bulls on performance test at the Oklahoma Panhandle State Central Testing Station have completed 84 days of the 112 day testing period. They will finish testing Jan. 29 and the top 70 head will sell in the 53rd Annual Performance Tested Bull Sale Feb. 23. Phil Light’s Angus bull 17-4 sired by Bon View New Design 878 leads the junior age bulls with an ADG (Average Daily Gain) of 5.46 pounds. Tim Meier’s Angus bull 21-1 sired by GAR New Design 9391 is second with a gain of 5.38 pounds per day. Two other Phil Light bulls
2007 December 20
The annual bull buying season starts—time to bone up on EPDs While the development of expected progeny differences (EPDs) is complicated, the application of EPD numbers to bull-buying techniques is reasonably straightforward and simple. At this time of year, most producers are preparing for the future as they gear up to purchase bulls for their cow herd. These purchases, which start with solid relationships between the seed stock supplier and the commercial beef producer, have a huge impact on the future of the beef business. The livestock periodicals are filled with bull advertisements. The business of selling bulls is very competitive and
by WLJ
2007 December 20
What’s the risk worth? Over the last couple of weeks, the beef industry has been concerned with the corn dilemma and was focused on livestock production costs and efficiencies. It appears there is no way to avoid increased production costs on feed rations that utilize a lot of corn. The Jan. 12 corn report compounded those production concerns when it showed 2006 production at 10.5 billion bushels. This might be a billion bushels lower than mid summer estimates, but this is still a respectable corn crop. Now that we have ethanol production in full swing, we’re going to have to adjust
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Twin bills introduced last week in House, Senate. Spurred on by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and much ill will over not passing the troublesome bill last year, members of Congress renewed their efforts to stop the slaughter of horses last week. Legislators in both the House and Senate simultaneously introduced identical legislation to the bill passed in the House with a 263 to 146 vote. In the Senate, Mary Landrieu, D-LA, introduced the “Virgie S. Arden American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act,” S. 311, the Senate version of the bill, along with John Ensign, R-NV, and 11 original
by WLJ
2007 December 20
When USDA cut the 2006 crop estimate last week, corn prices soared to more than $4.10 per bushel on the Chicago Board of Trade (CBT). Because of global demand and rapid growth in the ethanol industry, the third largest corn crop on record has done little to lower prices or help cattle feeding margins. It also added pressure to an already lackluster calf market and sidelined buyers of feeder cattle. USDA’s National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS) estimated total corn production in the U.S. at 10.5 billion bushels, 2 percent lower than the November forecast and 5 percent less than the
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Some producers and industry professionals have reason to celebrate as Rep. Denny Rehberg, R-MT, introduced legislation Jan. 9 that would move the implementation date of mandatory Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) from September 2008 to September 2007. Sen. Max Baucus, Democrat, also from Montana, later expressed his support of the change in date as well. The law to implement mandatory COOL was included in the 2002 Farm Bill. It requires a label on meat products stating where the animal was born, raised, and processed. Labeling was set to take effect in September 2004, but opponents of mandatory COOL have stalled funding
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Winter weather hit the southern Plains hard last week and hindered the cattle markets in Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri, where ice storms brought shipments to a grinding halt. With the likelihood of more snow in the forecast for late last week and the weekend, some light fed cattle got underway early last Thursday at $140 dressed basis in Nebraska. Prior to the light trade development last week, which wasn’t enough to call a trend, the prior week’s live sales in the South came at $88. In the North, live sales traded at $87-89 and dressed sales were in a range
by WLJ
2007 December 20
How many pastures should you have? How many pastures should you have? The short answer to this question is, more is better. The more pastures you have, the more flexibility you have. Just think, if you have 36 pastures and each one will hold your entire herd for 10 days, that would equal year-round grazing with only 10 days of use on each pasture. Once when we were pasture walking in Hawaii, I asked a young fellow how many pastures he had. He said, with a smile on his face, “How many do you want?” He was strip grazing a common Hawaiian
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Earlier this month, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) proposed a rule that has some producers scratching their heads. The proposed rule would declare the Patagonia South sub-region of Argentina free of rinderpest and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). It also marks the first time that a country’s regions have been treated differently in terms of disease status. As a part of the safeguards proposed by APHIS, the area will be added to the list of regions subject to restrictions on meat and meat products because of its trading relationships and close proximity to areas still infected with the two diseases.
by WLJ
2007 December 20
These are words of warning. I have appeared in front of a jury about a lease agreement gone bad and it was not a pleasant experience for either party. I have also witnessed a multi-million dollar property sale go sour due to a vague, incomplete, simple one-page long-term lease agreement within a family. The warning here is to place some real thought behind these rental or lease agreements. Please cover all the “what-if” scenarios that you can think of, like fire, drought, subleasing, fence conditions, salting, over grazing, diseases or whatever your concerns are. Make it a win, win agreement for
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Angus producers in Texas and surrounding states have a new marketing opportunity. Now more than ever, it pays to aim for the Certified Angus Beef (CAB) brand target and feed your load-lot groups at Hartley Feeders. Located in the northern Panhandle near Hartley, TX, and owned by Five Rivers Ranch Cattle Feeding LLC, the feedlot has negotiated a CAB alliance grid with Swift & Co. for delivery at its Dumas, TX, plant from Hartley Feeders. Swift & Co. is a leading packer in high quality branded beef programs. CAB, a non-profit subsidiary of the American Angus Association, operates the world’s largest
by WLJ
2007 December 20
He addressed the Red Meat Club Thursday, Jan. 12, at the National Western Stock Show in Denver, CO. “I was supposed to come last year, but it did not work out accordingly,” said Yeutter. “I was not going to miss it for anything this time. I see this as a privilege to address industry leaders at this commemorative event.” Yeutter is currently counsel to Hogan & Hartson, LLP, one of the nation’s largest law firms. During his presentation to cattlemen and industry leaders last week, he brought a direct, unique perspective to the table. He discussed many issues confronting cattlemen, but
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Regarding restrictions, U.S. industry and trade leaders are working to increase the age limitation from 21 months to 30 months of age to further expand the amount of cattle that meet the required criteria. Phillip Seng, president and chief executive officer of the U.S. Meat Export Federation located in Denver, CO, said the restrictions are not rooted in fact, but instead are based on fears. More specifically, Japan has reported 21 cases of BSE as of Jan. 12. Seng said Japanese consumers are fearful of beef in their country and are under the impression that U.S. beef is just as
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Tyson Foods, Inc. and Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) are teaming up to provide CAB brand Natural beef, the two organizations announced today. Tyson will also soon begin offering Star Ranch Natural Angus Beef. “The CAB brand and Star Ranch Angus Beef have been very successful programs for Tyson and we’re excited to add ‘natural’ product lines to both,” said Noel White, group vice president of Tyson Fresh Meats. “Consumer demand for natural beef is increasing and we believe there’s an opportunity for us to grow with it. While we have every confidence in our traditional beef products, we also believe
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Jan. 13, Denver, CO Beef Palace Auction Arena, National Western Stock Show 46 Bulls $5,886 Sale Management: American Angus Association One of the highlights of the Denver Angus activities is this annual bull sale and the sale of the Angus Foundation heifer package benefitting the Angus Foundation work supports education, youth and research. The bulls offered were from some the countries foremost breeding firms, featuring the freshest genetics and solid performance numbers many definite herd sire prospects. The standing room only crowd filled this auction arena here on the “Hill.” it was a very active strong sale with cattle scattering across the country. As
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Female division 1, May 4-23, 2004 1st, EXLR Sheza 518P, EXLR Dakota 353G, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 2nd, MAGS Puppet Master, EXLR Dakota 353G, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, MAGS Pink Rose, EXLR Dakota 353G, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 4th, Auto Miss America 836P, Auto American Idol, Pinegar Limousin, Springfield, MO; 5th, MAGS Perils of Pauline, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Female division 1, April 3-25, 2004 1st, Carrousels Presley, GPFF Blaque Rulon, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 2nd, MAGS Puff, Mags Kaptain America, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, Deatsman's Precious 418P, Wulfs Keynote 5474K, Renee
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The debate over horse slaughter was raging last week in Congress and the courts. The largely emotional debate about whether or not horse slaughter should be allowed to continue reached a fever pitch. Advocates on both sides reacted swiftly to the decision and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), which can clearly smell blood in the water, is attempting to ban the shipment of horses to Canada and Mexico. Those two nations represent the only alternative to slaughtering them here. If HSUS has its way, there will be no slaughtering of horses in or from the U.S. All the
by WLJ
2007 December 20
The two Texas plants have vowed to continue to fight for their legal right to slaughter horses, according to former Texas Congressional Rep. Charlie Stenholm who now serves as spokesman for the plants. The remaining U.S. horse slaughter plant is located in Illinois and is not subject to the federal court ruling. “Those who want these plants to shut down should be careful what they wish for,” said Stenholm. “If these plants shut down tomorrow, the nation’s patchwork of horse rescue facilities would be overwhelmed. They can barely manage to care for the approximately 6,000 horses already in the system.
by WLJ
2007 December 20
Jan. 13, Denver, CO Beef Palace Auction Arena, National Western Stock Show 46 Bulls $5,886 Sale Management: American Angus Association One of the highlights of the Denver Angus activities is this annual bull sale and the sale of the Angus Foundation heifer package benefitting the Angus Foundation work supports education, youth and research. The bulls offered were from some the countries foremost breeding firms, featuring the freshest genetics and solid performance numbers many definite herd sire prospects. The standing room only crowd filled this auction arena here on the “Hill.” it was a very active strong sale with cattle scattering across the country. As