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by WLJ
2016 May 13
Your recent story (“More troubled waters on the Klamath,” May 2) on challenges facing the Klamath Irrigation District (KID), while certainly well-intended, is unfortunately flawed. That is because it relies on information provided by the individual who makes himself the centerpiece of the article; Larry Kogan, a New York City attorney.


by WLJ
2016 May 13
I am writing in response to your recent article (“More Troubled Waters on the Klamath,” May 2), which appears to rely heavily on the perspective of Larry Kogan, an East Coast attorney recently hired on by the Klamath Irrigation District (KID).


2016 May 13
The recent moisture and heat has the grass growing; these are happy notes but with a dark side. Fast-growing, lush grass may not have enough magnesium (Mg) within its rapidly growing stems and leaves to meet the daily requirement for Mg in the lactating cow.


2016 May 13
“I’ll just DVR it,” someone might say if they can’t make plans to be in front of the television when their favorite show or special report is scheduled to air. It’s become something of a verb, like suggesting you do an internet web search by “Googling it.


2016 May 6
There’s always a silver lining. When it comes to markets, the hopeful element comes from the fact that down markets have the ability to go up. Market analysts last week were cautiously optimistic that the cattle and beef markets either have or were in the process of setting a market low for the season.


by WLJ
2016 May 6
“Cattle slaughter [year-to-date] is up 1.3 percent or 125,000 head above the prior year, while beef production is up 3.0 percent,” Andrew Gottschalk of Hedgers Edge last week. “Beef production [during the week of April 25-30] was 6.3 percent above year-ago levels.


2016 May 6
USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) released a three-year conservation strategy for the lesser prairie-chicken at the end of April. Noting that the bird’s habitat is located almost exclusively on privately-held lands, the emphasis on partnering with landowners in ways that are mutually beneficial was strong.


2016 May 6
“Cattle might possess the greatest genetics for growth and carcass merit and be fed the most finely tuned ration nutritionists can formulate, but if the feeding environment is too stressful, those animals will simply not perform as well as expected,” said Warren Rusche, South Dakota State University (SDSU) Extension Cow/Calf Field Specialist.


2016 May 6
“A slimelike mucilage is secreted by microbes when they break down organic matter. This substance cements tiny soil particles into larger ones,” said David Trinklein, Horticulture Specialist for University of Missouri Extension. “The result is porous soil, which is important for good root growth.


2016 May 6
If you wait too long, perhaps until this fall, time will have mellowed most of the events and one soon has difficulty matching a calving season with particular problems. Plus it may be too late to make the necessary changes to reduce calving losses. Now is perhaps the best time to make a few notes on what to change for next year.


2016 May 6
With headquarters in Billings, MT, R-CALF filed its case with the District Court in Montana, claiming its members are having their First Amendment rights denied because USDA forces the ranchers to pay into the state’s chapter of the checkoff program without having a say in the marketing strategy.


2016 May 6
Let’s start with managing self-feeders. Just dump the feed in and the calves take care of the rest. Right? Wrong. First, we have to consider whether we want the calves on limited feed intake or “full feed.” If limit feeding is the plan, we usually use roughage or perhaps salt to limit intake to the desired level.


2016 May 6
Yet Glanz has already been told his corn crop will face a quality control audit this growing season by Des Moines-based Rain and Hail LLC after Glanz informed his insurance agent that he plans to interseed a cover-crop mix into his standing corn crop this year.


2016 May 6
A new online course from Nebraska Extension has been developed for feedlots to teach workers, pen riders and processors safe horse handling and care. This one of a kind online certificate course is available 24/7 to allow cattle operations the flexibility of providing training to their workers as needed.




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